Homemade Sweet Potato Pie

Homemade Sweet Potato Pie
This Sweet Potato Pie recipe is subtly spiced, has a layer of brown sugar baked onto the crust, and gets a little kick from bourbon.
READ: Homemade Sweet Potato Pie

Homemade Sweet Potato Pie

This Sweet Potato Pie recipe is subtly spiced, has a layer of brown sugar baked onto the crust, and gets a little kick from bourbon.

READ: Homemade Sweet Potato Pie

Making Homemade Pomegranate Molasses Is Easy As 1, 2, 3

My grocery store, smack-dab in the middle of Nowheresville, N.Y., is sparse, to say the least. It’s the kind of place where discovering a head of radicchio is akin to winning the vegetable lottery.
The condiment aisle can be equally maddening: A jar o…

My grocery store, smack-dab in the middle of Nowheresville, N.Y., is sparse, to say the least. It’s the kind of place where discovering a head of radicchio is akin to winning the vegetable lottery.

The condiment aisle can be equally maddening: A jar of harissa is there one week and gone the next. There are either three kinds of tahini or none at all. And finding pomegranate molasses? Forget it.

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Homemade BBQ Sauce

This Kansas City-style homemade BBQ sauce recipe is super quick and easy to make, and full of the best tangy, smoky and slightly-sweet flavors that everyone is sure to love! Friends, have you ever tried making homemade BBQ sauce? If not, it’s time. ♡ And as a KC girl, I’m going to vote that you […]

This Kansas City-style homemade BBQ sauce recipe is super quick and easy to make, and full of the best tangy, smoky and slightly-sweet flavors that everyone is sure to love!

Homemade BBQ Sauce Recipe

Friends, have you ever tried making homemade BBQ sauce?

If not, it’s time. ♡

And as a KC girl, I’m going to vote that you make this Kansas City-style bbq sauce recipe!  It’s super-easy to make — just stir everything together and simmer for about 15 minutes — and it’s full of that famous tangy, smoky and slightly-sweet blend of flavors that we all love in Kansas City.

We use this sauce regularly in our house to make traditional bbq chicken, pulled pork, ribs and baked beans.  But it also works great as a pizza sauce (hello, bbq chicken pizza ♡) and as a glaze (on meatballs, meatloaf, etc).  And of course, you’re welcome to get creative and add it into everything from soups to salads, tacos, burgers, casseroles and more.

So many ways to use homemade bbq sauce.  So let’s make a batch! (more…)

Irish Brown Bread

A couple of years ago I made my first loaf of Irish Soda Bread for St. Patrick’s Day, and instantly fell in love. I loved the thick, hearty texture and simple, yet complex, flavor. It’s perfect for toasting and slathering with butter and jam, to soak up extra broth from your favorite Irish stew or […]

The post Irish Brown Bread appeared first on Brown Eyed Baker.

A couple of years ago I made my first loaf of Irish Soda Bread for St. Patrick’s Day, and instantly fell in love. I loved the thick, hearty texture and simple, yet complex, flavor. It’s perfect for toasting and slathering with butter and jam, to soak up extra broth from your favorite Irish stew or to eat alongside corned beef hash. Any way you cut it, it’s a fabulous bread that I have enjoyed over and over since first trying it. This year, I started seeing mention of Irish brown bread and went about trying to find some authentic recipes. Well, I found tons. And they all seemed to contradict each other in terms of what makes Irish brown bread truly “authentic” – some had to contain oats, some said absolutely no eggs, some said only four ingredients, and the list goes on and on. In the end it seemed that there was no one set of rules for Irish brown bread and I decided on this version from David Lebovitz’ blog, which comes from the chef/owner of Longueville House in Ireland.

I loved this version because it included such a wide variety of flours and grains – all-purpose flour, whole wheat flour, and a combination of wheat bran and wheat germ. I used a stone-ground whole wheat flour and oat bran since I didn’t have any wheat bran or wheat germ on hand. It takes the hearty texture of the bread to a whole new level and is absolutely, utterly delicious. I cut the original recipe in half since the original calls for such a large amount of flour. David suggested dividing the recipe into two loaves, but I just halved it and made one. For the full recipe, be sure to check out David’s blog.

I think I am now officially converted to the brown bread version of Irish soda bread – it’s delish!

One year ago: Asiago Bagels
Two years ago: Baked Oatmeal
Three years ago: Royal Crown’s Tortano
Four years ago: Mexican Rice

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Irish Brown Bread

A classic bread recipe from Ireland
Course Bread
Cuisine Irish
Prep Time 10 minutes
Cook Time 35 minutes
Total Time 45 minutes
Servings 8 servings (1 loaf)
Calories 223kcal
Author Michelle

Ingredients

  • 1 cup + 1½ teaspoons whole wheat flour
  • ½ cup + 1½ teaspoons wheat bran oat bran or wheat germ, or a combination
  • 2 cups all-purpose flour
  • ¾ teaspoon baking soda
  • ½ teaspoon salt
  • 2 tablespoons unsalted butter cold and cut into small pieces
  • cups buttermilk
  • 1 teaspoon molasses

Instructions

  • 1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees F. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper or a silicone baking mat and put it on the center oven rack.
  • 2. Whisk together the whole wheat flour and wheat/oat bran or wheat germ in a large bowl.
  • 3. In a medium bowl, whisk together the all-purpose flour, baking soda and salt. Add to the wheat flour mixture and whisk to combine.
  • 4. Add the butter pieces and rub them into small pieces with the flour mixture using your fingers, until as small as possible.
  • 5. Stir in the buttermilk and molasses until the dough is uniformly damp. Turn out onto a lightly floured countertop and knead gently, until the dough forms a smooth ball.
  • 6. Use a sharp serrated knife (or a lame) to slice a cross deeply into the top of the bread, about 1-inch deep. Place the loaf on the hot baking sheet.
  • 7. Bake for about 30 to 35 minutes, or until the loaf is firm on top and when you tap the bottom, feels hollow.
  • 8. Remove from the oven and cool on a wire rack for about one hour before serving.

Nutrition

Calories: 223kcal | Carbohydrates: 39g | Protein: 7g | Fat: 4g | Saturated Fat: 2g | Cholesterol: 11mg | Sodium: 289mg | Potassium: 194mg | Fiber: 4g | Sugar: 2g | Vitamin A: 150IU | Calcium: 57mg | Iron: 2.4mg

The post Irish Brown Bread appeared first on Brown Eyed Baker.

Oatmeal Chocolate Chip Cookies

Here’s the very best chocolate chip oatmeal cookies recipe you’ll find! Chewy and packed with chocolate, a hint of molasses makes them utterly irresistible. You’re in for a treat with this one! This is our very favorite oatmeal chocolate chip cookies recipe. And let me start with a disclaimer: I have a very high bar for cookies! Most cookies to me just taste like sugar. But this isn’t a normal cookie. These are full of texture and flavor. They’re gooey and chewy, loaded with dark chocolate and topped with sea salt. They’re just sweet enough, and filled with just the right amount of oats. The best part? They’re flavored with a hint of molasses, which makes them utterly irresistible. Ready to bake? The secrets to the best oatmeal chocolate chip cookies Alex and I made quite a few batches of these oatmeal chocolate chip cookies to make them just perfect. (One of the pitfalls of our job, I guess!) We served the final “perfect” batch we served to some friends as a birthday treat, and let me tell you: they disappeared very quickly! The birthday boy gave them a hearty “WOW,” which made our day. These cookies work for any […]

A Couple Cooks – Healthy, Whole Food, & Vegetarian Recipes

Here’s the very best chocolate chip oatmeal cookies recipe you’ll find! Chewy and packed with chocolate, a hint of molasses makes them utterly irresistible.

Oatmeal chocolate chip cookies

You’re in for a treat with this one! This is our very favorite oatmeal chocolate chip cookies recipe. And let me start with a disclaimer: I have a very high bar for cookies! Most cookies to me just taste like sugar. But this isn’t a normal cookie. These are full of texture and flavor. They’re gooey and chewy, loaded with dark chocolate and topped with sea salt. They’re just sweet enough, and filled with just the right amount of oats. The best part? They’re flavored with a hint of molasses, which makes them utterly irresistible. Ready to bake?

Oatmeal chocolate chip cookies

The secrets to the best oatmeal chocolate chip cookies

Alex and I made quite a few batches of these oatmeal chocolate chip cookies to make them just perfect. (One of the pitfalls of our job, I guess!) We served the final “perfect” batch we served to some friends as a birthday treat, and let me tell you: they disappeared very quickly! The birthday boy gave them a hearty “WOW,” which made our day. These cookies work for any occasion: the holidays, birthdays, or just a sweet treat to celebrate any occasion. What’s the secret to wow’ing your friends and family with these easy cookies?

  • Use a hint of molasses. In our research, we found that adding molasses to your oatmeal chocolate chip cookies can bring out an extra nuance. Do not omit! It makes a rich and satisfying flavor.
  • Lots of oatmeal, stirred in at the end. To get that perfect cookie texture, stir in the rolled oats after you’ve mixed up the dough (with the chocolate chips). This way the oats make for a fluffy texture, instead of getting deflated in the mixer.
  • Dark chocolate chips + flaky sea salt. Dark chocolate gives a depth that just doesn’t work with semi-sweet. And the sweet and salty combo is truly irresistible.
Best oatmeal cookies

Try to scoop them as evenly as possible (2 tablespoons dough per cookie.

Here’s another secret to pro-level oatmeal chocolate chip cookies! Make sure that when you scoop out the dough, it’s as even as possible. Here you’ll want to scoop it into 2-tablespoon balls. To do this, Alex and I used our 1/8 cup measure. If you know your kitchen math, you’ll know that 2 tablespoons equals 1/8 cup!

An aside: I’m nerd-ily obsessed with our 1/8 cup measure. Anytime something calls for 2 tablespoons, I use the 1/8 cup and then secretly am proud of my conversion skills (ha!). Alex and I would recommend getting one for your kitchen: we’re surprised at how much we use ours! If you’d like one for yourself, you can grab an 1/8 cup measure on Amazon.

Of course, if you don’t have an 1/8 cup you can approximate 2 tablespoons. But you’ll want to get them as even as possible. Otherwise you’ll end up with some small cookies and some large, and the bake time is a little different if the size is off. So work for the more uniform dough balls you can!

Oatmeal chocolate chip cookies

Press in extra chocolate to the tops.

For the best-looking oatmeal chocolate chip cookies, it’s nice to press a few additional chocolate chips into the tops of the cookies. Of course this is not required, but if you don’t do this, some cookies come out looking “bare” whereas others have some chocolate towards the top. Pressing in additional chocolate helps for a more uniform look.

When you do press in the chocolate chips, here’s a tip: add them in irregular patterns! If you top each cookie with 3 chocolate chips in the same design, they’re all going to look weirdly symmetrical. Alex and I tried to add them quickly without thinking too hard, but do a different amount per cookie. And if a cookie has some chocolate chips already towards the top, feel free to skip it! You want it to look organic and natural.

How to make chewy oatmeal chocolate chip cookies

One last tip before we get to this recipe! For the very best chewy texture on these oatmeal chocolate chip cookies, here’s what we do: slightly underbake them. But only in the slightest bit! Pull them out of the oven when they’re just set. Getting them out just before they’re fully set makes for a cookie that stays chewy for days afterward. If you prefer your cookies a little more done, by all means: bake them longer! But we love them chewy, so we highly recommend this method.

Chocolate chip cookies with oatmeal

What’s the best way to store oatmeal cookies?

Of course, these oatmeal chocolate chip cookies taste best right out of the oven! (What cookie doesn’t?) They’re just as fantastic the day of baking. But don’t worry: they save well too! Just keep them in a sealed container at room temperature for up to 5 days. You can also freeze them for up to 3 months.

If you do slightly underbake to keep them on the chewy side: do not add a piece of bread to the container when you store them! Adding a piece of bread helps to retain moisture for certain types of cookies. But we tested and for these cookies, the bread adds too much moisture and makes them a little gooey. They stay good and chewy on their own: so no need to store with bread!

Oatmeal chocolate chip cookies

Are these healthy cookies?

Not really. Is any cookie a healthy cookie? All cookies have sugar, which is inherently not healthy. Cookies are meant as a treat! But there are a few things that make these cookies healthier than others:

  • They’re 160 calories per serving, lower than most recipes.
  • They’re small-ish, helping with that calorie count.
  • They have less sugar than most recipes.

Is there a vegan or dairy free variation?

Yes! You can make these cookies dairy free by using coconut oil (or vegan butter) instead of the butter. If you do this, you can use an extra 1/4 teaspoon kosher salt to make up for the salt that’s in salted butter.

To make these cookies vegan, try substituting flax eggs for the eggs. We haven’t tried it yet, but we’ve tried it in other cookies and it should work well here!

This oatmeal chocolate chip cookies recipe is…

Vegetarian. For vegan, plant based and dairy free, see the substitutes in the recipe below.

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Oatmeal chocolate chip cookies

Oatmeal Chocolate Chip Cookies (The Very BEST!)


1 Star2 Stars3 Stars4 Stars5 Stars (6 votes, average: 5.00 out of 5)

  • Author: Sonja Overhiser
  • Prep Time: 30 minutes
  • Cook Time: 10 minutes
  • Total Time: 40 minutes
  • Yield: 24 cookies

Description

Here’s the very best chocolate chip oatmeal cookies recipe you’ll find! Chewy and packed with chocolate, a hint of molasses makes them irresistible.


Ingredients

  • 1 1/4 cup all-purpose flour
  • 1/2 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1/2 teaspoon baking powder
  • 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • 1/2 teaspoon kosher salt
  • 10 tablespoons salted butter, at room temperature*
  • 1/3 cup brown sugar, packed
  • 1/3 cup granulated sugar
  • 2 eggs
  • 1 tablespoon vanilla extract
  • 2 tablespoons molasses
  • 2 cups rolled oats
  • 1 cup dark chocolate chips
  • Flaked sea salt, for topping

Instructions

  1. In a medium bowl, whisk all-purpose flour, baking soda, baking powder, cinnamon, and kosher salt.
  2. In the bowl of a stand mixer, mix the butter, brown sugar, and granulated sugar on medium high for 1 to 2 minutes, scraping the bowl as necessary, until well combined.
  3. Add in eggs, vanilla, and molasses and combine on medium for about 30 seconds until fully combined. Add flour mixture and mix on low until combined. Add oats and 3/4 cup chocolate chips and mix on low for a few seconds until combined. Take the bowl off of the mixer and use a spatula to stir just until the oats and chocolate chips are evenly distributed.
  4. Transfer to a covered container. Chill 12 minutes.
  5. Preheat the oven to 350 degrees with two racks spaced out.
  6. Line two baking sheets with parchment paper. Remove the bowl with the dough from the refrigerator. Scoop cookies into 2-tablespoon drops and roll quickly into balls (try to make the scoops as even as possible to ensure uniform cookies). Place balls on baking sheets with several inches between each cookie. Flatten the tops of each ball lightly with your hand and lightly press in the additional 1/4 cup chocolate chips to the tops where needed. Sprinkle with sea salt.
  7. Bake for 5 minutes, then remove and rotate sheets and put them back in on the opposite racks. Bake about 5 more minutes until they just set (we like pulling them out just slightly underbaked, which makes them chewy when cooled). Cool several minutes and then transfer to wire rack to fully cool. Store at room temperature in a cookie tin or freeze for up to 3 months.

Notes

*For vegan, substitute coconut oil for the butter and add an addition 1/4 teaspoon more salt. Substitute flax eggs for the eggs, and use vegan chocolate.

  • Category: Dessert
  • Method: Baked
  • Cuisine: Cookies

Keywords: Oatmeal Chocolate Chip Cookies, oatmeal cookies, chewy, soft, molasses, healthy

A Couple Cooks - Healthy, Whole Food, & Vegetarian Recipes

Gingerbread Cookies

Gingerbread Cookies are the essence of the holidays and are deeply flavored with spices and molasses. Decorate with royal icing and enjoy them for dessert or on your Christmas tree! Continue reading “Gingerbread Cookies” »

Gingerbread Cookies are the essence of the holidays and are deeply flavored with spices and molasses. Decorate with royal icing and enjoy them for dessert or on your Christmas tree!

Continue reading "Gingerbread Cookies" »

7 Molasses Substitutes for When, Oops, You Ran Out

You’re a few steps into these community-favorite bran muffins when you realize: Bleep-bleep, you don’t have molasses. The recipe only calls for 3 tablespoons—so is it okay to substitute? I’ll cut to the chase: Yes. (And phew!) Today, we’ll cover molass…

You’re a few steps into these community-favorite bran muffins when you realize: Bleep-bleep, you don’t have molasses. The recipe only calls for 3 tablespoons—so is it okay to substitute? I’ll cut to the chase: Yes. (And phew!) Today, we’ll cover molasses basics, our go-to molasses substitutes, and share swapping advice for a few of our favorite recipes.


Molasses 101

What is molasses, anyway?

Simply put, molasses is a byproduct of sugar processing, whether that’s sugar cane or sugar beets. When sugar is refined, “the juice squeezed from these plants is boiled to a syrupy mixture from which sugar crystals are extracted,” according to The New Food Lover’s Companion. “The remaining brownish-black liquid is molasses.” Got it!

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Claudia Fleming’s Stout Gingerbread

I could probably name about a dozen people who could be called baking legends. One of them is Claudia Fleming, who was the pastry chef at Gramercy Tavern, and whose book, The Last Course, became a cookbook classic. Claudia was known for desserts that managed to balance seasonal fruits, as well as chocolate, spices, herbs, grains, and even vegetables, not by using fancy techniques, but…

I could probably name about a dozen people who could be called baking legends. One of them is Claudia Fleming, who was the pastry chef at Gramercy Tavern, and whose book, The Last Course, became a cookbook classic.

Claudia was known for desserts that managed to balance seasonal fruits, as well as chocolate, spices, herbs, grains, and even vegetables, not by using fancy techniques, but by presenting them with contrasting or complementary ingredients. The Last Course is a compilation of some of her best desserts, which came out in 2001. (My copy, above, is a first edition and I’m proud to say I was one of the first people to buy it.) As books do, this one eventually sailed out of print and used copies went for steep prices. I held on to mine, resisting offers to sell it. But I’m happy to report that The Last Course is back in print, and available to all.

Continue Reading Claudia Fleming’s Stout Gingerbread...

pan-banging molasses espresso cookies with chocolate

This recipe originally appeared in Bake From Scratch Vol 3, along with several other cookies recipes I contributed, and now is in the new Bake From Scratch Cookie Collection. Since I just finished the pan-banging chapter for my next book (coming out Fa…

pan banging molasses espresso cookies

This recipe originally appeared in Bake From Scratch Vol 3, along with several other cookies recipes I contributed, and now is in the new Bake From Scratch Cookie Collection. Since I just finished the pan-banging chapter for my next book (coming out Fall 2020!), I thought I would include it here to celebrate. These cookies have the crisp, ripply edges and gooey, chocolate center my original recipe is known for, along with a tiny hit of molasses and some ground espresso. If you make them, please let me know! You can tag me on Instagram, or tag #panbanging or #bangonapan (or, of course, leave a comment here if you aren’t on social media!).  Pan-Banging Molasses Espresso Cookies with Chocolate From Bake From Scratch Vol. 3. Makes 10 cookies PRINT THIS RECIPE 1 3/4 cup [249g] all-purpose flour 1 tablespoon [6g] ground espresso 3/4 teaspoon salt 1/2 teaspoon baking soda 12 tablespoons [170g] unsalted butter, room temperature 1 1/2 cups [300g] granulated sugar 2 tablespoons [42g] mild molasses 1 large egg 1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract 4 ounces [113g] bittersweet or semisweet chocolate, chopped into bite-sized pieces Adjust an oven rack to the middle position and preheat the oven to 350F […]

The post pan-banging molasses espresso cookies with chocolate appeared first on The Vanilla Bean Blog.