For a Low-Key Night, Snacks & Wine Are All I Need

We teamed up with A to Z Wineworks—a certified B-Corp known for their food-friendly wines made in Oregon—to share the laid-back snacks we’re cozying up with this winter, plus our fave sip to go with: their 2017 A to Z Pinot Noir.

Here’s something yo…

We teamed up with A to Z Wineworks—a certified B-Corp known for their food-friendly wines made in Oregon—to share the laid-back snacks we’re cozying up with this winter, plus our fave sip to go with: their 2017 A to Z Pinot Noir.


Here’s something you should know about me: My ideal holiday evening consists of drinking wine and snacking…while sitting on the couch in my pajamas. Don’t get me wrong, I love to cook a big holiday meal, get dressed up, and hit a cookie-swap party—or three. But this year, I’m staying home and keeping things low-key.

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Rosé Coq Au Vin.

Rosé coq au vin is the star of the show today!! Oh this meal! It is too good to be true. So! My mission for December is to share a bunch of special dinner-worthy meals with you. With the holidays looking the way they are, I know that lots of you will be spending more […]

The post Rosé Coq Au Vin. appeared first on How Sweet Eats.

Rosé coq au vin is the star of the show today!!

rosé coq au vin recipe

Oh this meal! It is too good to be true.

chicken marinating in rosé

So! My mission for December is to share a bunch of special dinner-worthy meals with you. With the holidays looking the way they are, I know that lots of you will be spending more time on your own, in your house, without the fun gatherings that we’re all used to and especially without all the delish holiday food.

While my go-to for Christmas is always a beef tenderloin, I’ve made a few fancy meals for this season that taste so incredible and make dinnertime feel extra special.

These meals take a bit of time and preparation, but I promise it is worth it. 100%. It can be a holiday project that you get to sit down and eat!

chicken browning in pancetta fat

First up?

Coq au vin.

But not just any coq au vin. We’re making with with rosé instead of red wine. 

I KNOW I KNOW! That may sound blasphemous to some of you, but I promise it adds a wonderful light twist. And the sauce is still incredibly rich and decadent and perfect.

Seriously. I want to dip an entire loaf of toasted sourdough in this sauce every time I make it.

rosé coq au vin recipe

While beef bourguignon is a meal I’ve made a million times, coq au vin was more off the radar. I don’t know why! It just wasn’t something I was ever drawn to for us, and I would often make the more decadent beef stew or something like that.

That is… until now.

This chicken dish is unreal. The flavor is superb! I have no other word for it.

rosé coq au vin recipe

Traditional coq au vin has you marinate chicken in wine, and then you cook that marinade down into the most delicious gravy-like sauce. The whole dish also starts with bacon, which adds another layer of flavor.

Like most stews, there are also onions and mushrooms and carrots. Of course, you can edit these vegetables based on what you love. 

One of the parts I love the most? We caramelize pearl onions until golden and sweet and fragrant and add them to the pot. Oh my gosh – it’s like eating a savory candy right in your meal. Absolutely wonderful. 

rosé coq au vin recipe

Even after marinating the chicken, the dish will still take a little over an hour or so to come together. I promise this time is worth it. It’s a meal that I enjoy making – one that brings me back to why I love cooking so much. Usually my days, weeks and months are always so go-go-go, but 2020 changed that. Of course, I still find myself rushing through cooking mostly for the reason that I’m cooking SO much (like every meal, for everyone!) but not this one. 

This is one of those meals that you want to savor making. Every step builds upon each layer of flavor. Each step is important and not one want you want overlook. And those steps make the chicken fall-apart tender, the sauce rich and silky and the vegetables melt in your mouth.

rosé coq au vin recipe

I beg of you: don’t forget the bread! Slices of toasted sourdough are essential here for dipping. Of course, you can make some potatoes or rice or something else if you feel the meal needs more substance. But it’s an indulgent meal, and one that I find is complemented perfectly by golden, buttery sourdough. The toast adds a crunch to each bite and of course – is more than perfectly for dipping and soaking up the remaining sauce. 

rosé coq au vin recipe

Heaven on earth!

rosé coq au vin recipe

Rosé Coq Au Vin

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Rosé Coq Au Vin

This rosé coq au vin is a modern twist on the classic dish made with red wine. Instead, we use light rosé for a rich, delicious base.
Course Main Course
Cuisine American
Prep Time 2 hours
Cook Time 1 hour 30 minutes
Total Time 3 hours 30 minutes
Servings 4 people
Author How Sweet Eats

Ingredients

  • 2 pounds bone-in chicken thighs and legs
  • kosher salt and pepper
  • 3 cups rosé wine
  • 1 cup chicken stock
  • 4 sprigs fresh thyme
  • 4 ounces diced pancetta
  • 2 tablespoons butter
  • 1 large sweet onion, diced
  • 4 garlic cloves, minced
  • 2 large carrots, cut into 1-inch rounds
  • 12 ounces cremini mushrooms
  • 1 teaspoon tomato paste
  • 1 tablespoon all-purpose flour
  • 2 tablespoons brandy
  • 12 ounces pearl onions, peeled
  • 2 tablespoons unsalted butter
  • 1 teaspoon sugar
  • ¼ teaspoon salt
  • 1 loaf of sourdough bread, sliced (or 6 to 8 slices)
  • 3 tablespoons chopped fresh parsley

Instructions

  • Season the chicken all over generously with salt and pepper. Place the chicken in a large bowl. Cover it with the wine and chicken stock. Add the fresh thyme into the bowl. Cover and refrigerate. Marinate for at least 2 hours, or overnight.
  • When you’re ready to make the dish, heat the pancetta in a large pot or dutch oven over medium heat. Cook until crispy and the fat is rendered, about 10 minutes. Remove the pancetta with a slotted spoon and place it on a paper towel to drain excess grease.
  • Remove the chicken from the wine (keep the wine marinade!) and pat the chicken completely dry. Add the chicken to the same pot with the fat from the pancetta and sear on all sides. You may need to do this in batches! Sear for about 3 to 4 minutes total, just until all sides are deeply golden. Remove the chicken and place it on a plate.
  • With the heat over medium-low, add the 2 tablespoons of butter. Stir in the onions, carrots and garlic with a pinch of salt and pepper. Cook until softened, about 5 minutes. Stir in the mushrooms. Cook until those soften, another 5 to 6 minutes. Stir in the tomato paste and cook for 2 minutes. Stir in the flour and cook for 2 minutes more.
  • Deglaze the pan with the brandy, adding it and stirring, cooking for 1 to 2 minutes. Stir in the remaining wine marinade from the chicken. Bring the mixture to a boil. Cook, stirring often, until the mixture reduces by half, about 10 to 12 minutes.
  • Add the chicken and the pancetta back to the pot. Reduce the heat to low, just so it’s barely simmering. Cover the pot and cook for 45 to 60 minutes, turning the chicken halfway through. Taste and season with more salt and pepper if necessary.
  • When the dish is almost finished, heat the 1 tablespoon of butter in a skillet. Once melted, stir in the pearl onions with the sugar and salt. Cook, stirring often, until the onions are caramelly, about 10 minutes. Remove the onions from the skillet and add them to the pot with the chicken.
  • In the same skillet where you cooked the onions, add the sourdough slices and toast them. If needed, you can add in another tablespoon or so of butter - or just butter the bread and toast it until golden.
  • Sprinkle the chicken dish with the chopped parsley. Serve the chicken with the sauce and vegetables, along with the bread for dipping.

Notes

adapted from ny times

This is last meal worthy.

The post Rosé Coq Au Vin. appeared first on How Sweet Eats.

Holiday Gift Guide: Bringing France to You and Others

Hello, Emily here, from day 29 of the 2nd confinement (lockdown) in France. I never thought you could miss the city you live in, but I miss Paris. Physically she remains present and although stores are allowed to reopen tomorrow, restaurants will remain closed, the streets are quiet and the soul of the city is sleeping. The old Latin motto of Paris is ‘Fluctuat nec mergitur’…

Hello, Emily here, from day 29 of the 2nd confinement (lockdown) in France.

I never thought you could miss the city you live in, but I miss Paris. Physically she remains present and although stores are allowed to reopen tomorrow, restaurants will remain closed, the streets are quiet and the soul of the city is sleeping. The old Latin motto of Paris is ‘Fluctuat nec mergitur’ which roughly translates to ‘tossed by the waves but never sunk’ and wow, has 2020 done some tossing. 

During the second lockdown we have been restricted to a 1km (about half a mile) radius from our homes with a permission slip needed (that you fill out yourself) to go out for essentials (food, medical appointments, etc.) or to exercise. While my little radius included some of my favorite places, most of the city has been decidedly off-limits. 

Over the past 4 weeks we made the most of our allocated hour of ‘exercise’ each day in the nearby Jardin Du Luxembourg, letting the dog do her daily investigating, and letting our kids play in the fresh air. When possible, I also enjoyed a solo walk along the banks of the Seine, whose calm current reminded me that the history of France is filled with challenges that have been overcome. 

I never realized how much of the city I took for granted – perhaps a fitting metaphor for 2020? A quick stop at my local terrace for a coffee or chilled glass of wine, and a quiet exchange with the impeccably dressed waiter. The cultural institutions, who remain shuttered, their beauty and history waiting patiently to be frequented once again (although you can visit many online like the Louvre, Versailles, Centre Pompidou or the Musée d’Orsay). And the small boutiques and independent bookstores that I visit as much for the conversation with the owners as the books. But most of all, I am excited to return to the specialty food shops spread all over town, which were beyond my 1km ‘border.’  Continue Reading Holiday Gift Guide: Bringing France to You and Others...

3 Cozy Dinners on Our Holiday Radar—Plus, Wines to Go With

We’ve partnered with Imagery Wine Collection—a portfolio of unique, artistically inspired wines—to share holiday-ready wine and food pairings, plus plating tips and tricks for creating a stunning spread.

There’s something about the holidays that mak…

We've partnered with Imagery Wine Collection—a portfolio of unique, artistically inspired wines—to share holiday-ready wine and food pairings, plus plating tips and tricks for creating a stunning spread.


There’s something about the holidays that makes me want to cook meals more lavish than the average dinner: glistening roasts, free-poured cream and cheese over grains, fish so tender it practically falls apart.

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Why Box Wine Is Your Best Bet This Thanksgiving (& Beyond)

Box wine is sometimes jokingly referred to as “Cardbordeaux,” thought of as a college party drink we wouldn’t serve on a sophisticated table. But we’re here to tell you that times, they are a-changin. The newer, upscale boxes from smaller domestic prod…

Box wine is sometimes jokingly referred to as “Cardbordeaux,” thought of as a college party drink we wouldn’t serve on a sophisticated table. But we’re here to tell you that times, they are a-changin. The newer, upscale boxes from smaller domestic producers or cult European importers are a maybe-overlooked, actually optimal choice for this year’s meal—once opened, they store up to a month in the refrigerator).

In Europe, “bag in a box” wines are a growth segment, popular because they’re sustainable—less packaging, less fuel burned in transportation, smaller carbon footprint—and low-cost, usually coming in at $20 to $40 for four-bottles-worth of volume. Here, they can be an insider trick; one of the biggest markets in the U.S. for this wine are chefs in higher-end kitchens who “want wine that is of a higher quality to use in cooking, and stays fresh longer,” says Camilo Ceballos, wine director of New York–based wine importer Omni Wines.

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How Long Does That Open Bottle of Wine Last, Really?

Internet memes may tell you “there’s no such thing as leftover wine.”—a joke about drinking that misses the point that very often in daily life we might not finish an open bottle. If we do have leftovers, the conventional wisdom is that the clock is …

Internet memes may tell you “there’s no such thing as leftover wine.”—a joke about drinking that misses the point that very often in daily life we might not finish an open bottle. If we do have leftovers, the conventional wisdom is that the clock is ticking, since wine is best the same day it’s opened, or should be consumed by the next day at most. This is frustrating, though, if you don’t want to drink that opened wine the very next day or if you don’t have the chance, especially when the leftovers are of a great quality. And pouring “old” wine out feels like a waste. Many of us will ask under these circumstances, But how bad can it be?

The process that starts when you open a bottle of wine is called aeration, which leads to oxidation, which “increases color change and the loss of fruity characteristics,” according to professor Gavin Sacks, Professor of Enology and Viticulture in the Department of Food Science at Cornell University. It also “leads to the loss of sulphur dioxide, which preserves the wine,” he says, and dissipates aromas. Even if you put the cork back in, the process continues, since no closure is airtight and oxygen has already been introduced.

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Portobello Vegan Pot Roast

Vegan Pot Roast is a hearty, filling and comforting dinner for any day of the week. It is a one-pot meal that it is easy to make especially meatless. The variety of veggies as well as the large portobello mushroom caps will make it as a full course mea…

Vegan Pot Roast is a hearty, filling and comforting dinner for any day of the week. It is a one-pot meal that it is easy to make especially meatless. The variety of veggies as well as the large portobello mushroom caps will make it as a full course meal for the whole family.  So let’s...

Read More

The post Portobello Vegan Pot Roast appeared first on My Pure Plants.

Oven-Roasted Plums

I made a statement recently on social media that plums were my favorite fruit. I guess I said the same thing about cherries, at some point, which I was reminded of. But I’ll confess that I may have also said the same thing about nectarines, figs, mangoes, and litchis at some point in my life. However plums really are my favorite fruit, and I’m happy…

I made a statement recently on social media that plums were my favorite fruit. I guess I said the same thing about cherries, at some point, which I was reminded of. But I’ll confess that I may have also said the same thing about nectarines, figs, mangoes, and litchis at some point in my life. However plums really are my favorite fruit, and I’m happy that they stick around from summer all the way through the beginning of fall.

There are a lot of plums out there. In Northern California we had big purple Santa Rosa plums, as well as an array of others with names like Elephant Heart and Angelino, as well as pluots, a hybrid of apricots and plums. While they don’t show up in Paris, there are green Reine Claudes (which are close to being at the top of my list for favorite varieties of plums), tiny golden Mirabelles, and sturdy Quetsches, which hold their shape relatively well during baking. And while they’re not as tart as U.S. varieties (most of the tartness of plums is in their skins), they are reliably good, and flavorful, when baked or oven-roasted, as I often prepare them.

Continue Reading Oven-Roasted Plums...

How to Pick a Wine You’ll Actually Like

Many people enjoy drinking wine without knowing what they like about the taste. These may be wine drinkers but not self-proclaimed “wine people,” who may not have immersed themselves in the details of grape varietals and growing regions. They may—or ma…

Many people enjoy drinking wine without knowing what they like about the taste. These may be wine drinkers but not self-proclaimed “wine people,” who may not have immersed themselves in the details of grape varietals and growing regions. They may—or may not!—know what they like, but they don’t understand why one particular wine hits their sweet spot or know how to put what they liked into words.

The good news is that in the course of ordinary-life wine drinking, with just a few easy steps, you can gain insight into your palate. If you don’t know wine well, or are just embarking on a journey of discovery, understanding what you like will make the shelves in the liquor store less of a blank wall, help maximize your money, and for people who drink a glass with dinner, can really enhance the food. The following are eight easy steps to winey self-knowledge.

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Creamy Shrimp Pasta

This shrimp pasta is easy to make with the best big flavors: garlic, lemon, and Parmesan. It’s a home run dinner idea that’s always a hit! With one bite, you’ll add this to your weekly dinner rotation. You’ll want to bookmark this recipe: Creamy Shrimp Pasta! It’s ultra classic: juicy, savory shrimp and al dente pasta swimming in a creamy sauce. Because we love options, we’ve provide two sauce ideas: a white wine sauce, bursting with tangy flavor. Or try our easy cream sauce, a creamy Parmesan sauce that’s actually made with no cream at all. Mix the components together and wow! The flavor is restaurant style good, but you can make it in about 30 minutes. Dinner time win. How to make shrimp pasta (basic method) This shrimp pasta is one of those basic recipes like avocado toast or Caesar salad that are popular because they are just that good. The flavors are like perfect dance partners: savory shrimp, creamy Parmesan, tangy lemon (or white wine), and of course…garlic. This recipe is easy to make, but you’ll have to balance making three components at once: shrimp, noodles, and sauce. Here’s what you need to do at the same time: […]

A Couple Cooks – Healthy, Whole Food, & Vegetarian Recipes

This shrimp pasta is easy to make with the best big flavors: garlic, lemon, and Parmesan. It’s a home run dinner idea that’s always a hit!

Shrimp pasta

With one bite, you’ll add this to your weekly dinner rotation. You’ll want to bookmark this recipe: Creamy Shrimp Pasta! It’s ultra classic: juicy, savory shrimp and al dente pasta swimming in a creamy sauce. Because we love options, we’ve provide two sauce ideas: a white wine sauce, bursting with tangy flavor. Or try our easy cream sauce, a creamy Parmesan sauce that’s actually made with no cream at all. Mix the components together and wow! The flavor is restaurant style good, but you can make it in about 30 minutes. Dinner time win.

How to make shrimp pasta (basic method)

This shrimp pasta is one of those basic recipes like avocado toast or Caesar salad that are popular because they are just that good. The flavors are like perfect dance partners: savory shrimp, creamy Parmesan, tangy lemon (or white wine), and of course…garlic. This recipe is easy to make, but you’ll have to balance making three components at once: shrimp, noodles, and sauce. Here’s what you need to do at the same time:

  • Make perfectly al dente pasta: Start the pasta pot to boil before making the other two components. Bucatini is our favorite noodle here; it’s like a hollow spaghetti. See below for more!
  • Saute the shrimp: This takes just 3 to 4 minutes in a hot skillet. You’ll just need to make sure your shrimp is thawed, if you’re using frozen (see below).
  • Make the sauce: Once the shrimp is done, make that sauce and you’re good to go! Pick from one of the two sauces below. While you’re making it, finish and drain those noodles. Then mix it all together! Done and done.
Shrimp pasta

Option 1: White wine sauce

This shrimp pasta is excellent with our simple white wine sauce! It’s one of our favorite ways to serve it. Here’s what to know about this option:

  • This sauce is lightly creamy with a tangy, wine-forward flavor. The flavor is bright and fairly wine forward. But our 3 year old Larson loves it so it’s kid friendly too.
  • It uses heavy cream, but you can sub milk if desired. If you prefer not using heavy cream (it’s not a standard in our pantry!), you can use milk.
  • It does have trace amounts of alcohol (0.8 ounces per serving). We felt comfortable serving this pasta to our 3 year old. But you should do only what you’re comfortable with! If you prefer, keep reading and make the Cream Sauce…
Parmesan cream sauce

Option 2: Parmesan cream sauce

The other option is our easy Parmesan cream sauce! Here’s what to know about this sauce option:

  • This sauce is very creamy, with a thicker texture than the wine sauce. It’s a little closer to an alfredo sauce.
  • It requires a little more attention when making it. For this sauce, you’ll make a roux where you’ll cook flour and butter as a thickener. It’s a little touchier than the white wine sauce. Make sure to read the directions carefully before you start.
  • You’ll need to add a splash of milk when you add it to the noodles. It’s stickier and creamier than the wine sauce. Add a splash or two of milk when you add it to the noodles and stir until you get the right creamy consistency.

Which do we like better? We love them both! When we’re feeling fancy we like the white wine sauce. When we’re feeling like a creamy, cozy pasta we go for the cream sauce. Let us know which you prefer!

The type of shrimp for shrimp pasta

What’s the best type of shrimp to buy for shrimp pasta? There are so many options when you get to the store. (In fact, we often accidentally grab the wrong variety!) Here’s what we recommend for this recipe:

  • Large or medium shrimp. We like the look with large, but you can get away with medium, too!
  • Tail on or off. Tail on shrimp looks beautiful, but it does make for messy fingers when you’re eating it. Tail off can be more practical.
  • Fresh or frozen. Either works! Frozen can taste just as fresh if it’s flash frozen right after cooking. Make sure to thaw it the night before, or use this defrosting method for thawing day of.
  • Wild caught preferred. Wild caught is the most sustainable option! If you live in the US, try to find US-raised: it’s also typically more sustainable. (Read more here.)
Shrimp pasta

Tips for how to cook pasta to al dente

The shrimp and sauce are important in this recipe…but the noodles are extremely important too! You absolutely must cook the noodles to al dente for this shrimp pasta to be the best it can be. Al dente means “to the bite” in Italian. The ideal al dente texture is a tender exterior balanced by a firm bite with a fleck of white at its core. Here are our tips onn how to cook pasta to al dente:

  • Taste often. Do not trust the package instructions! While cooking, check pasta continually for doneness.
  • Look for a small white fleck. As soon as the pasta has a tender exterior but a fleck of white at its core, drain it! Even a few seconds can be the difference between al dente and limp noodles.
Shrimp pasta

What to serve with shrimp pasta

There’s not much you need to add to this shrimp pasta to make it a healthy dinner! Toss together a simple salad and you’re good to go. But if you’re entertaining, you can get a little fancier too. Here are a variety of options we’d pair to make it a complete meal:

This shrimp pasta recipe is…

Pescatarian.

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Shrimp pasta

Creamy Shrimp Pasta


1 Star2 Stars3 Stars4 Stars5 Stars (5 votes, average: 5.00 out of 5)

  • Author: Sonja Overhiser
  • Prep Time: 15 minutes
  • Cook Time: 15 minutes
  • Total Time: 30 minutes
  • Yield: 4 servings

Description

This shrimp pasta is easy to make with the best big flavors: garlic, lemon, and Parmesan. It’s a home run dinner idea that’s always a hit!


Ingredients

  • 1 pound large shrimp, deveined (tail on or off, wild caught preferred)
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 1/2 teaspoon each smoked paprika, garlic powder and onion powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon kosher salt
  • 1 recipe White Wine Sauce or Parmesan Cream Sauce
  • 8 ounces spaghetti
  • Finely chopped Italian parsley, to garnish
  • Lemon wedges, to garnish

Instructions

  1. If frozen, thaw the shrimp.
  2. Cook the pasta: Start a pot of well salted water to a boil. Boil the pasta until it is just al dente. Start tasting a few minutes before the package recommends: you want it to be tender but still a little firm on the inside; usually around 7 to 8 minutes. Drain the pasta. (If it finishes before the sauce, add it back to the pot with a drizzle of olive oil so it doesn’t stick.)
  3. Cook the shrimp: Pat the shrimp dry. In a medium bowl, mix the shrimp with the spices. In a large skillet, heat the olive oil on medium high heat. Cook the shrimp for 1 to 2 minutes per side until opaque and cooked through, turning them with tongs. Set them aside.
  4. Make the sauce: Wipe out the skillet. In the same skillet make the White Wine Sauce or Parmesan Cream Sauce (takes about 10 minutes).
  5. Serve: When the sauce is done, add the noodles to the skillet with the sauce. (For the Cream Sauce only, add a splash or two of milk to loosen the sauce and come to just the right creamy consistency.) Then add the shrimp and toss until it’s warmed through. Taste and a few more pinches of salt, if necessary. Remove from the heat. Garnish with finely chopped parsley and lemon wedges. Serve immediately.

  • Category: Main Dish
  • Method: Stovetop
  • Cuisine: Italian

Keywords: Shrimp pasta, Easy shrimp pasta, How to make shrimp pasta, Cream sauce, White wine sauce

More easy shrimp recipes

Love shrimp? It’s always a hit in our house, even (and especially) with kids. Here are some other great shrimp dinner ideas and healthy shrimp recipes:

  • Shrimp Pesto Pasta An impressively fast and easy dinner recipe! Cover the noodles in glistening green basil pesto for a meal that pleases everyone.
  • Easy Pesto Shrimp Or go without the noodles! Serve with pasta or rice for an easy dinner idea.
  • Grilled Shrimp Skewers The shrimp seasoning brings in just the right touch of savory and smoky.
  • Shrimp Fried Rice Here’s how to make the best shrimp fried rice that tastes just like takeout!
  • Shrimp Curry Tastes better than a restaurant in under 30 minutes! It’s a Thai red curry flavored with coconut milk and curry paste.

A Couple Cooks - Healthy, Whole Food, & Vegetarian Recipes