How Long Does That Open Bottle of Wine Last, Really?

Internet memes may tell you “there’s no such thing as leftover wine.”—a joke about drinking that misses the point that very often in daily life we might not finish an open bottle. If we do have leftovers, the conventional wisdom is that the clock is …

Internet memes may tell you “there’s no such thing as leftover wine.”—a joke about drinking that misses the point that very often in daily life we might not finish an open bottle. If we do have leftovers, the conventional wisdom is that the clock is ticking, since wine is best the same day it’s opened, or should be consumed by the next day at most. This is frustrating, though, if you don’t want to drink that opened wine the very next day or if you don’t have the chance, especially when the leftovers are of a great quality. And pouring “old” wine out feels like a waste. Many of us will ask under these circumstances, But how bad can it be?

The process that starts when you open a bottle of wine is called aeration, which leads to oxidation, which “increases color change and the loss of fruity characteristics,” according to professor Gavin Sacks, Professor of Enology and Viticulture in the Department of Food Science at Cornell University. It also “leads to the loss of sulphur dioxide, which preserves the wine,” he says, and dissipates aromas. Even if you put the cork back in, the process continues, since no closure is airtight and oxygen has already been introduced.

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Portobello Vegan Pot Roast

Vegan Pot Roast is a hearty, filling and comforting dinner for any day of the week. It is a one-pot meal that it is easy to make especially meatless. The variety of veggies as well as the large portobello mushroom caps will make it as a full course mea…

Vegan Pot Roast is a hearty, filling and comforting dinner for any day of the week. It is a one-pot meal that it is easy to make especially meatless. The variety of veggies as well as the large portobello mushroom caps will make it as a full course meal for the whole family.  So let’s...

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The post Portobello Vegan Pot Roast appeared first on My Pure Plants.

Oven-Roasted Plums

I made a statement recently on social media that plums were my favorite fruit. I guess I said the same thing about cherries, at some point, which I was reminded of. But I’ll confess that I may have also said the same thing about nectarines, figs, mangoes, and litchis at some point in my life. However plums really are my favorite fruit, and I’m happy…

I made a statement recently on social media that plums were my favorite fruit. I guess I said the same thing about cherries, at some point, which I was reminded of. But I’ll confess that I may have also said the same thing about nectarines, figs, mangoes, and litchis at some point in my life. However plums really are my favorite fruit, and I’m happy that they stick around from summer all the way through the beginning of fall.

There are a lot of plums out there. In Northern California we had big purple Santa Rosa plums, as well as an array of others with names like Elephant Heart and Angelino, as well as pluots, a hybrid of apricots and plums. While they don’t show up in Paris, there are green Reine Claudes (which are close to being at the top of my list for favorite varieties of plums), tiny golden Mirabelles, and sturdy Quetsches, which hold their shape relatively well during baking. And while they’re not as tart as U.S. varieties (most of the tartness of plums is in their skins), they are reliably good, and flavorful, when baked or oven-roasted, as I often prepare them.

Continue Reading Oven-Roasted Plums...

How to Pick a Wine You’ll Actually Like

Many people enjoy drinking wine without knowing what they like about the taste. These may be wine drinkers but not self-proclaimed “wine people,” who may not have immersed themselves in the details of grape varietals and growing regions. They may—or ma…

Many people enjoy drinking wine without knowing what they like about the taste. These may be wine drinkers but not self-proclaimed “wine people,” who may not have immersed themselves in the details of grape varietals and growing regions. They may—or may not!—know what they like, but they don’t understand why one particular wine hits their sweet spot or know how to put what they liked into words.

The good news is that in the course of ordinary-life wine drinking, with just a few easy steps, you can gain insight into your palate. If you don’t know wine well, or are just embarking on a journey of discovery, understanding what you like will make the shelves in the liquor store less of a blank wall, help maximize your money, and for people who drink a glass with dinner, can really enhance the food. The following are eight easy steps to winey self-knowledge.

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Creamy Shrimp Pasta

This shrimp pasta is easy to make with the best big flavors: garlic, lemon, and Parmesan. It’s a home run dinner idea that’s always a hit! With one bite, you’ll add this to your weekly dinner rotation. You’ll want to bookmark this recipe: Creamy Shrimp Pasta! It’s ultra classic: juicy, savory shrimp and al dente pasta swimming in a creamy sauce. Because we love options, we’ve provide two sauce ideas: a white wine sauce, bursting with tangy flavor. Or try our easy cream sauce, a creamy Parmesan sauce that’s actually made with no cream at all. Mix the components together and wow! The flavor is restaurant style good, but you can make it in about 30 minutes. Dinner time win. How to make shrimp pasta (basic method) This shrimp pasta is one of those basic recipes like avocado toast or Caesar salad that are popular because they are just that good. The flavors are like perfect dance partners: savory shrimp, creamy Parmesan, tangy lemon (or white wine), and of course…garlic. This recipe is easy to make, but you’ll have to balance making three components at once: shrimp, noodles, and sauce. Here’s what you need to do at the same time: […]

A Couple Cooks – Healthy, Whole Food, & Vegetarian Recipes

This shrimp pasta is easy to make with the best big flavors: garlic, lemon, and Parmesan. It’s a home run dinner idea that’s always a hit!

Shrimp pasta

With one bite, you’ll add this to your weekly dinner rotation. You’ll want to bookmark this recipe: Creamy Shrimp Pasta! It’s ultra classic: juicy, savory shrimp and al dente pasta swimming in a creamy sauce. Because we love options, we’ve provide two sauce ideas: a white wine sauce, bursting with tangy flavor. Or try our easy cream sauce, a creamy Parmesan sauce that’s actually made with no cream at all. Mix the components together and wow! The flavor is restaurant style good, but you can make it in about 30 minutes. Dinner time win.

How to make shrimp pasta (basic method)

This shrimp pasta is one of those basic recipes like avocado toast or Caesar salad that are popular because they are just that good. The flavors are like perfect dance partners: savory shrimp, creamy Parmesan, tangy lemon (or white wine), and of course…garlic. This recipe is easy to make, but you’ll have to balance making three components at once: shrimp, noodles, and sauce. Here’s what you need to do at the same time:

  • Make perfectly al dente pasta: Start the pasta pot to boil before making the other two components. Bucatini is our favorite noodle here; it’s like a hollow spaghetti. See below for more!
  • Saute the shrimp: This takes just 3 to 4 minutes in a hot skillet. You’ll just need to make sure your shrimp is thawed, if you’re using frozen (see below).
  • Make the sauce: Once the shrimp is done, make that sauce and you’re good to go! Pick from one of the two sauces below. While you’re making it, finish and drain those noodles. Then mix it all together! Done and done.
Shrimp pasta

Option 1: White wine sauce

This shrimp pasta is excellent with our simple white wine sauce! It’s one of our favorite ways to serve it. Here’s what to know about this option:

  • This sauce is lightly creamy with a tangy, wine-forward flavor. The flavor is bright and fairly wine forward. But our 3 year old Larson loves it so it’s kid friendly too.
  • It uses heavy cream, but you can sub milk if desired. If you prefer not using heavy cream (it’s not a standard in our pantry!), you can use milk.
  • It does have trace amounts of alcohol (0.8 ounces per serving). We felt comfortable serving this pasta to our 3 year old. But you should do only what you’re comfortable with! If you prefer, keep reading and make the Cream Sauce…
Parmesan cream sauce

Option 2: Parmesan cream sauce

The other option is our easy Parmesan cream sauce! Here’s what to know about this sauce option:

  • This sauce is very creamy, with a thicker texture than the wine sauce. It’s a little closer to an alfredo sauce.
  • It requires a little more attention when making it. For this sauce, you’ll make a roux where you’ll cook flour and butter as a thickener. It’s a little touchier than the white wine sauce. Make sure to read the directions carefully before you start.
  • You’ll need to add a splash of milk when you add it to the noodles. It’s stickier and creamier than the wine sauce. Add a splash or two of milk when you add it to the noodles and stir until you get the right creamy consistency.

Which do we like better? We love them both! When we’re feeling fancy we like the white wine sauce. When we’re feeling like a creamy, cozy pasta we go for the cream sauce. Let us know which you prefer!

The type of shrimp for shrimp pasta

What’s the best type of shrimp to buy for shrimp pasta? There are so many options when you get to the store. (In fact, we often accidentally grab the wrong variety!) Here’s what we recommend for this recipe:

  • Large or medium shrimp. We like the look with large, but you can get away with medium, too!
  • Tail on or off. Tail on shrimp looks beautiful, but it does make for messy fingers when you’re eating it. Tail off can be more practical.
  • Fresh or frozen. Either works! Frozen can taste just as fresh if it’s flash frozen right after cooking. Make sure to thaw it the night before, or use this defrosting method for thawing day of.
  • Wild caught preferred. Wild caught is the most sustainable option! If you live in the US, try to find US-raised: it’s also typically more sustainable. (Read more here.)
Shrimp pasta

Tips for how to cook pasta to al dente

The shrimp and sauce are important in this recipe…but the noodles are extremely important too! You absolutely must cook the noodles to al dente for this shrimp pasta to be the best it can be. Al dente means “to the bite” in Italian. The ideal al dente texture is a tender exterior balanced by a firm bite with a fleck of white at its core. Here are our tips onn how to cook pasta to al dente:

  • Taste often. Do not trust the package instructions! While cooking, check pasta continually for doneness.
  • Look for a small white fleck. As soon as the pasta has a tender exterior but a fleck of white at its core, drain it! Even a few seconds can be the difference between al dente and limp noodles.
Shrimp pasta

What to serve with shrimp pasta

There’s not much you need to add to this shrimp pasta to make it a healthy dinner! Toss together a simple salad and you’re good to go. But if you’re entertaining, you can get a little fancier too. Here are a variety of options we’d pair to make it a complete meal:

This shrimp pasta recipe is…

Pescatarian.

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Shrimp pasta

Creamy Shrimp Pasta


1 Star2 Stars3 Stars4 Stars5 Stars (5 votes, average: 5.00 out of 5)

  • Author: Sonja Overhiser
  • Prep Time: 15 minutes
  • Cook Time: 15 minutes
  • Total Time: 30 minutes
  • Yield: 4 servings

Description

This shrimp pasta is easy to make with the best big flavors: garlic, lemon, and Parmesan. It’s a home run dinner idea that’s always a hit!


Ingredients

  • 1 pound large shrimp, deveined (tail on or off, wild caught preferred)
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 1/2 teaspoon each smoked paprika, garlic powder and onion powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon kosher salt
  • 1 recipe White Wine Sauce or Parmesan Cream Sauce
  • 8 ounces spaghetti
  • Finely chopped Italian parsley, to garnish
  • Lemon wedges, to garnish

Instructions

  1. If frozen, thaw the shrimp.
  2. Cook the pasta: Start a pot of well salted water to a boil. Boil the pasta until it is just al dente. Start tasting a few minutes before the package recommends: you want it to be tender but still a little firm on the inside; usually around 7 to 8 minutes. Drain the pasta. (If it finishes before the sauce, add it back to the pot with a drizzle of olive oil so it doesn’t stick.)
  3. Cook the shrimp: Pat the shrimp dry. In a medium bowl, mix the shrimp with the spices. In a large skillet, heat the olive oil on medium high heat. Cook the shrimp for 1 to 2 minutes per side until opaque and cooked through, turning them with tongs. Set them aside.
  4. Make the sauce: Wipe out the skillet. In the same skillet make the White Wine Sauce or Parmesan Cream Sauce (takes about 10 minutes).
  5. Serve: When the sauce is done, add the noodles to the skillet with the sauce. (For the Cream Sauce only, add a splash or two of milk to loosen the sauce and come to just the right creamy consistency.) Then add the shrimp and toss until it’s warmed through. Taste and a few more pinches of salt, if necessary. Remove from the heat. Garnish with finely chopped parsley and lemon wedges. Serve immediately.

  • Category: Main Dish
  • Method: Stovetop
  • Cuisine: Italian

Keywords: Shrimp pasta, Easy shrimp pasta, How to make shrimp pasta, Cream sauce, White wine sauce

More easy shrimp recipes

Love shrimp? It’s always a hit in our house, even (and especially) with kids. Here are some other great shrimp dinner ideas and healthy shrimp recipes:

  • Shrimp Pesto Pasta An impressively fast and easy dinner recipe! Cover the noodles in glistening green basil pesto for a meal that pleases everyone.
  • Easy Pesto Shrimp Or go without the noodles! Serve with pasta or rice for an easy dinner idea.
  • Grilled Shrimp Skewers The shrimp seasoning brings in just the right touch of savory and smoky.
  • Shrimp Fried Rice Here’s how to make the best shrimp fried rice that tastes just like takeout!
  • Shrimp Curry Tastes better than a restaurant in under 30 minutes! It’s a Thai red curry flavored with coconut milk and curry paste.

A Couple Cooks - Healthy, Whole Food, & Vegetarian Recipes

Dirty Lemon

It’s been quite a year for businesses in Paris. From the gilets jaunes movement, to the longest transit strike in French history, then a pandemic, they’ve had to tough a lot of things out. One of the troopers has been Dirty Lemon. After a major remodel of a space that formerly held a LED-lit sushi restaurant, I had a night out with friends – Jennifer,…

It’s been quite a year for businesses in Paris. From the gilets jaunes movement, to the longest transit strike in French history, then a pandemic, they’ve had to tough a lot of things out. One of the troopers has been Dirty Lemon. After a major remodel of a space that formerly held a LED-lit sushi restaurant, I had a night out with friends – Jennifer, Jane, and Forest – at Dirty Lemon, tasting and testing some of the cocktails on their menu. And even better, enjoying the food of cheffe/owner Ruba Khoury.

Ruba’s goal was to create a bar and space that was for everyone, but especially women-friendly, something she said was lacking in Paris. The name comes from a bad experience she had with a funky lemon she was served, and ate (with unfortunate results), at a cocktail bar in the Marais. But Ruba knows her stuff. She worked at such esteemed restaurants in Paris at Septime, Yam’Tcha, and Frenchie before creating the menu at Ibrik, which I loved, that reflected her Palestinean heritage and growing up in multicultural Dubai.

Continue Reading Dirty Lemon...

15 Crisp White Wines We’d Buy by the Case

The warmer the weather gets, the more I want white wine. Crisp, bright, mineraly, cold-as-can-be white wine. Probably with an ice cube or two! Hopefully in the sun. And my coworkers feel the same way. This week, I asked them for their best white wine p…

The warmer the weather gets, the more I want white wine. Crisp, bright, mineraly, cold-as-can-be white wine. Probably with an ice cube or two! Hopefully in the sun. And my coworkers feel the same way. This week, I asked them for their best white wine picks and let’s just say, they had a lot of thoughts.

Here are our favorite white wines for summer (and beyond!), according to the Food52 team. Cheers.

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Rose Sangria

Here’s how to make rose sangria! Just a handful of ingredients and fruit make a light and fruity summer drink that everyone will be talking about. There’s red sangria and white sangria…so why not rose sangria? This sangria made with rosé wine is so light and refreshing, so filled with fruity, delicate flavor, that it’s jumped to the top of our favorites list. It’s perfect for summer entertaining, be it a lazy afternoon, pool party, lake house or dinner party drink. Sangria is so often made with too much sugar, or non traditional ingredients like ginger ale. This recipe shows you how to make rose sangria: the Spanish way! It makes for a delicate, nuanced flavor that’s just sweet enough and will leave you wanting more. Love rosé drinks? Try our Rosé Spritzer or Best Frose (Frozen Rosé). Ingredients for rose sangria Sangría is a traditional wine punch that originates from Spain. The classic version is red sangria, made with red wine and chopped fruit, and often orange juice or brandy. There’s also white sangria, made with white wine. So while it’s a bit less standard: why not try it with rosé wine? Like many popular recipes, there are many variations […]

A Couple Cooks – Healthy, Whole Food, & Vegetarian Recipes

Here’s how to make rose sangria! Just a handful of ingredients and fruit make a light and fruity summer drink that everyone will be talking about.

Rose sangria

There’s red sangria and white sangria…so why not rose sangria? This sangria made with rosé wine is so light and refreshing, so filled with fruity, delicate flavor, that it’s jumped to the top of our favorites list. It’s perfect for summer entertaining, be it a lazy afternoon, pool party, lake house or dinner party drink. Sangria is so often made with too much sugar, or non traditional ingredients like ginger ale. This recipe shows you how to make rose sangria: the Spanish way! It makes for a delicate, nuanced flavor that’s just sweet enough and will leave you wanting more.

Love rosé drinks? Try our Rosé Spritzer or Best Frose (Frozen Rosé).

Ingredients for rose sangria

Sangría is a traditional wine punch that originates from Spain. The classic version is red sangria, made with red wine and chopped fruit, and often orange juice or brandy. There’s also white sangria, made with white wine. So while it’s a bit less standard: why not try it with rosé wine? Like many popular recipes, there are many variations on the theme when it comes to ingredients. Here are the ingredients in this rose sangria:

  • Fruit: orangelemon and strawberries
  • Sugar
  • Rosé wine
  • Brandy
  • Sparkling water, optional
  • Mint, for garnish
Rose sangria

How to make rose sangria (the Spanish way)

Rose sangria is not often served in Spain, but it’s a variation on white sangria which is traditional. This method is inspired by our favorite Spanish chef, Jose Andres. Chef Andres is from Spain and started many successful restaurants here in the US (and is a Nobel prize nominee for this humanitarian work!). The “Spanish” way to make sangria that Chef Jose recommends is this:

  • Macerate fruit for 20 minutes: Mix the sangria fruit with sugar and let it macerate or stand at room temperature and break down. This helps the fruit flavors permeate the wine even more.
  • Add liquids: Add the rose wine and brandy. Throw in some lemon slices.
  • Refrigerate for 1 to 4 hours. This allows the flavors to meld and develop.

Voila! It’s ready to serve: a refreshing, unique sangria recipe you’ll want to make on repeat all summer long.

Rose sangria

Tip: don’t make more than 4 hours in advance

Once you mix up your batch of rose sangria, you’ll let it sit refrigerated for the flavors to meld. The minimum time for this step is 1 hour. But there is a maximum refrigeration time: we wouldn’t recommend anything beyond 4 hours! The fruit starts to be come soggy and lose their color, and the flavors fade a little. So, it’s not a drink to prep in advance: make it up an hour or so before you plan to drink!

Want bubbles? Serve with soda water

In Spain, it’s also traditional to top off your glass with a little soda water. This adds a bubbly effervescence that makes it even more refreshing! Serve your sangria right away, making sure to dish up a hefty portion of fruit in each glass as a garnish. We like to add a few ice cubes and then top off the glass with soda water. (Just please don’t add Sprite or ginger ale to this wine punch: promise?)

Rose sangria

Eat the fruit when serving!

Another cue we picked up on from Chef Andres is this: don’t let the fruit go to waste! When you serve sangria, serve it with skewers. Let your guests eat the remaining wine-soaked fruit in their drink using the skewers. It’s a perfect “dessert” or palate refresher after a meal.

Brandy vs Grand Marnier

For the other alcohol in this rose sangria, you can use brandy or Grand Marnier. There are lots of types of brandy: use brandy you have on hand. Cognac is a fancy type of brandy if you have that available (we have some for making the classic Sidecar). Grand Marnier is a mix of brandy and orange liqueur: it gives it a little higher end vibe. (If you have a bottle of Grand Marnier, also try it in a Cadillac Margarita.)

Rose sangria

More types of sangria to try

There are so many spins on sangria: some traditional and some more creative! Here are the best types of sangria to try:

This rose sangria recipe is…

Vegetarian, vegan, plant-based, dairy-free and gluten-free.

Print
Rose sangria

Best Rose Sangria


1 Star2 Stars3 Stars4 Stars5 Stars (5 votes, average: 5.00 out of 5)

  • Author: Sonja Overhiser
  • Prep Time: 90 minutes
  • Cook Time: 0 minutes
  • Total Time: 1 hour 30 minutes
  • Yield: 6
  • Diet: Vegan

Description

Here’s how to make rose sangria! Just a handful of ingredients and fruit make a light and fruity summer drink that everyone will be talking about.


Ingredients

  • 1 orange
  • 2 cups strawberries
  • 2 tablespoons sugar
  • 1 bottle rosé, chilled
  • 1/3 cup brandy or Grand Marnier
  • 1 handful mint leaves
  • 1/2 lemon, sliced into rounds
  • Sparkling water, for serving

Instructions

  1. Chop the orange (leaving the skin on). Slice the strawberries. Add both to the bottom of a pitcher, sprinkle with sugar and stir. Let them stand for 20 minutes at room temperature.
  2. After 20 minutes, pour in the rosé wine and brandy. Add the fresh mint and lemon rounds. Stir and refrigerate 1 to 4 hours. (Don’t go beyond 4 hours or the fruit texture starts to degrade.)
  3. Pour the sangria into ice filled glasses and top with a splash of sparkling water (if desired). Add fruit to each glass, preferably on long skewers for easy snacking.

  • Category: Drink
  • Method: Chilled
  • Cuisine: Spanish

Keywords: Rose Sangria

A Couple Cooks - Healthy, Whole Food, & Vegetarian Recipes

Why Are Wine Stores Considered Essential? This Winemaker Tells All.

“I’m trying to employ my newly-minted-motherhood tactic,” California winemaker Martha Stoumen explained to me over the phone. “Distraction is the best medicine.”

Stoumen’s winery is based in Sonoma County, CA. Following undergraduate studies in tradit…

“I’m trying to employ my newly-minted-motherhood tactic,” California winemaker Martha Stoumen explained to me over the phone. “Distraction is the best medicine.”

Stoumen's winery is based in Sonoma County, CA. Following undergraduate studies in traditional agricultural systems and Italian, she went to Tuscany to apprentice on a farm—working in the vineyard, olive orchard, and winery.

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6 Best Alcohol, Beer & Wine Delivery Services

Now more than ever, home is where many of us are seeking refuge and solace in light of the novel coronavirus. This is a tough time, but we’re here for you—whether it’s a new pantry recipe or a useful tip for your kitchen, here are some ideas to make th…

Now more than ever, home is where many of us are seeking refuge and solace in light of the novel coronavirus. This is a tough time, but we’re here for you—whether it’s a new pantry recipe or a useful tip for your kitchen, here are some ideas to make things run a little more smoothly for you and your loved ones.


As the COVID-19-induced quarantine wears on and we schedule more at-home date nights and virtual happy hours, one thing becomes abundantly clear: Even in these times of uncertainty, our desire for a refreshing, possibly strong, drink around 5 o’clock remains extremely certain.

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