How to Organize Your Spices So You Don’t Lose Your Dang Mind

When I moved back into my house last year after a kitchen renovation, I saw it as the clean slate I needed for every single organization project I had been meaning to get done but never did. What can I say, the years months just got away from me.

I de…

When I moved back into my house last year after a kitchen renovation, I saw it as the clean slate I needed for every single organization project I had been meaning to get done but never did. What can I say, the years months just got away from me.

I decided to start micro, so the first order of business was my spice drawer. Plus, I finally now had a place for them to land. Their home was to be a long drawer, almost 4-feet long, that pulled out of a narrow gap next to the fridge. Uniformity was my end goal so I joyfully threw out all the crack-lidded IKEA jars of powdered cinnamon and red stained bags of annatto and put in a sizable order with my local spice mecca, World Spice Merchants. Order would be mine at last! I fantasized about dozens of perfectly matched jars and hunted around for my label maker, no doubt hiding from me after all these years.

Read More >>

How to Get Turmeric Stains Out of Anything

Home is the place we feel the most like ourselves—where we kick off our shoes, share our meals, and make memories. We’re taking our love for all things home and brining it to Instagram. Follow along at Home52 and make yourselves—well, you know.

So y…

Home is the place we feel the most like ourselves—where we kick off our shoes, share our meals, and make memories. We're taking our love for all things home and brining it to Instagram. Follow along at Home52 and make yourselves—well, you know.


So you made a batch of turmeric tea to chase away a cold and poured the golden mixture into a favorite, pale-colored mug. Or you served turmeric soup in a white bowl, or wiped up a slick of curry with a light dish towel, or peeled fresh turmeric for a smoothie. And now your linens, your dishes, your countertop, and your hands all match your recipe: gold. Fresh or dried and ground, turmeric will stain just about anything, and quickly and stubbornly, but take a deep breath—it's going to be okay.

Read More >>

17 Flavor-Packed Ways to Use Turmeric—Fresh or Ground

If you have a jar of ground turmeric in your spice rack, it’s probably for one of two reasons. One: You cook a lot of cuisines that call for it in their dishes (like Indian, Thai, or Persian, perhaps) and your jar of ground turmeric gets almost a…

If you have a jar of ground turmeric in your spice rack, it’s probably for one of two reasons. One: You cook a lot of cuisines that call for it in their dishes (like Indian, Thai, or Persian, perhaps) and your jar of ground turmeric gets almost as much use as salt. Or, two: You picked up a jar of it ages ago for a recipe that called for a small amount—probably more for color than flavor—and your ground turmeric sees less action than juniper berries

Don’t get me wrong, I like its color-boosting powers, especially in scrambled tofu. It has a lot of value as an all-natural coloring agent: It’s used to color everything from mustard to chicken soup. (You can also use ground turmeric to dye Easter eggs.) 

Read More >>

Homemade Orange Bitters

Bitters are used in a number of cocktails. Even if you can’t strongly perceive them while you’re sipping your drink, like salt, lemon zest, and vanilla, bitters are used to balance the flavors in the glass, providing a gentle undernote to bolster or as a contrast to flavors, rather than domineering or taking center stage. When writing Drinking French* I kept in mind that most…

Bitters are used in a number of cocktails. Even if you can’t strongly perceive them while you’re sipping your drink, like salt, lemon zest, and vanilla, bitters are used to balance the flavors in the glass, providing a gentle undernote to bolster or as a contrast to flavors, rather than domineering or taking center stage.

When writing Drinking French* I kept in mind that most people either didn’t have access to a wide variety of bitters, or didn’t want to amass a line-up of little bottles of bitters at home just to make one cocktail. Although sometimes, a certain bitter does make a difference. So a few times, I nudged readers who might want to expand their flavor horizons towards a particular bitter, such as eucalyptus or salted chocolate. But in the overall picture, I like to give choices when writing a recipe in a book, so as many people ca make it as possible.

My fallback bitters are orange and aromatic (Angostura) because I wanted to make sure to use ones that people could easily find. Heck, I’ve even seen Angostura being sold in French supermarkets, as well as at Target stores in the U.S. So there’s really not that much of a barrier to getting your hands on a bottle.

Continue Reading Homemade Orange Bitters...

Claudia Fleming’s Stout Gingerbread

I could probably name about a dozen people who could be called baking legends. One of them is Claudia Fleming, who was the pastry chef at Gramercy Tavern, and whose book, The Last Course, became a cookbook classic. Claudia was known for desserts that managed to balance seasonal fruits, as well as chocolate, spices, herbs, grains, and even vegetables, not by using fancy techniques, but…

I could probably name about a dozen people who could be called baking legends. One of them is Claudia Fleming, who was the pastry chef at Gramercy Tavern, and whose book, The Last Course, became a cookbook classic.

Claudia was known for desserts that managed to balance seasonal fruits, as well as chocolate, spices, herbs, grains, and even vegetables, not by using fancy techniques, but by presenting them with contrasting or complementary ingredients. The Last Course is a compilation of some of her best desserts, which came out in 2001. (My copy, above, is a first edition and I’m proud to say I was one of the first people to buy it.) As books do, this one eventually sailed out of print and used copies went for steep prices. I held on to mine, resisting offers to sell it. But I’m happy to report that The Last Course is back in print, and available to all.

Continue Reading Claudia Fleming’s Stout Gingerbread...

The $3 Trader Joe’s Product I Can’t Stop Sprinkling on Everything

In the last few months, I’ve formed a somewhat obsessive relationship with a condiment.

I discovered my first jar of dukkah two years ago, on the spice shelves of my local Trader Joe’s—and decided to take it home. The next morning, chancing upon it as…

In the last few months, I’ve formed a somewhat obsessive relationship with a condiment.

I discovered my first jar of dukkah two years ago, on the spice shelves of my local Trader Joe’s—and decided to take it home. The next morning, chancing upon it as I grabbed some salt from the pantry, I sprinkled it onto my assembled avocado toast. The result was revelatory.

Read More >>

Vegan Pumpkin Bread

It’s moist, fluffy, pumpkin-spiced, and seriously cozy. Yes, this easy vegan pumpkin bread will change your life (we think). Fuzzy blankets, wool sweaters and hot cider can’t hold a candle to this one. Yes, this vegan pumpkin bread is the ultimate in cozy. It’s perfectly moist and intensely pumpkin spiced. Even better, it’s light and fluffy: so you get your pumpkin spice fix without it being overly heavy or rich. Yes, it’s a seriously good pumpkin bread that happens to be plant-based too! What makes the best pumpkin bread? My sister has been staying with us for the past few weeks; she’s been living in Southeast Asia and is now relocating back to the US. So in the in-between, she’s been living with Alex, Larson and me here in Indianapolis. It’s seriously fun to have aunt Lisa around at this stage in Larson’s life. And it’s given us all the excuses to try out cozy recipes on her! There’s nothing like a loaf of pumpkin bread in the oven to make a house guest feel at home, right? And when she tasted this one, she said, “This is the best pumpkin bread I’ve ever had!” We hope you’ll think the […]

A Couple Cooks – Healthy, Whole Food, Vegetarian Recipes

It’s moist, fluffy, pumpkin-spiced, and seriously cozy. Yes, this easy vegan pumpkin bread will change your life (we think).

Vegan Pumpkin Bread

Fuzzy blankets, wool sweaters and hot cider can’t hold a candle to this one. Yes, this vegan pumpkin bread is the ultimate in cozy. It’s perfectly moist and intensely pumpkin spiced. Even better, it’s light and fluffy: so you get your pumpkin spice fix without it being overly heavy or rich. Yes, it’s a seriously good pumpkin bread that happens to be plant-based too!

What makes the best pumpkin bread?

My sister has been staying with us for the past few weeks; she’s been living in Southeast Asia and is now relocating back to the US. So in the in-between, she’s been living with Alex, Larson and me here in Indianapolis. It’s seriously fun to have aunt Lisa around at this stage in Larson’s life. And it’s given us all the excuses to try out cozy recipes on her! There’s nothing like a loaf of pumpkin bread in the oven to make a house guest feel at home, right?

And when she tasted this one, she said, “This is the best pumpkin bread I’ve ever had!” We hope you’ll think the same. And after making it, reader Rachel said, “Everyone loved it! It was so moist and delicious with a subtle bit of pumpkin and sweetness. It wasn’t overpowering like some recipes/box mixes!”

Here’s what makes this the best vegan pumpkin bread we’ve made:

  • It’s light and fluffy. Lots of pumpkin breads are dense and oily. This one won’t leave you with a stomach ache.
  • It’s just sweet enough. We’ve used a combination of sugar and maple syrup so that it’s sweet, but not too sweet.
  • It’s perfectly spiced. The pumpkin spice level here brings just the right amount of warmth, without overpowering.
Vegan pumpkin bread

Tips for making this vegan pumpkin bread

This pumpkin bread is vegan, so it’s fully plant-based. Vegan baking is not so different from traditional baking: it uses just a few tricks to stand in for dairy and eggs. Here are a few tips for making this bread:

  • Use flax eggs. Here we use flax eggs to stand in for traditional eggs. If you’ve never made a flax egg, it’s quick and easy: all you need is ground flax seed and water! You’ll wait 15 minutes for the egg to “gel”: and while you’re doing this, finish prepping the wets and dries.
  • Baking pan: This recipe uses a 9-inch loaf pan. You can also make it in an 8-inch pan, you may just have to bake a little longer.
  • *Loaf size: Note that we’ve made this pumpkin bread to be a small sized loaf to keep the serving size to a healthy level. Some pumpkin bread recipes use almost double the ingredients for the same pan. Here we’ve kept it deliberately smaller, so there are less calories per serving.
What is in pumpkin pie spice

Make your own pumpkin spice

The best part of this vegan pumpkin bread is that it’s perfectly spiced! Here we’ve used our homemade pumpkin pie spice mixture. You can mix up a batch of your own, or feel free to use a store-bought blend. It’s actually perfect for gifts! A loaf of this pumpkin bread with a little container of pumpkin spice would be the most magical gift ever, in our minds! Here’s what’s in pumpkin spice:

  • Cinnamon
  • Ginger
  • Allspice
  • Cloves
  • Nutmeg
Vegan pumpkin bread

How to store it

What’s the best way to store this vegan pumpkin bread? One nice thing about quick breads is that they keep well at room temperature. (This is also true for our zucchini bread and vegan cornbread.) Typically when it’s around we can’t stay away from it, so it disappears quickly! Here’s what we’d recommend for storage:

  • Room temperature (2 to 3 days): Store at room temperature and cover it with a towel. The benefit of this method is that it stays well and tastes basically like it did the day of baking.
  • Refrigerated (1 week): Refrigerating your pumpkin bread helps it to stay fresher longer. We prefer letting it come to room temperature before serving.
  • Frozen (up to 3 months): To extend the life even further, pop your sliced bread into the freezer in a sealed container. It can last at least 3 months, or maybe more.
Vegan pumpkin bread

This vegan pumpkin bread recipe is…

Vegetarian, vegan, plant-based, and dairy-free.

Print
Vegan Pumpkin Bread

Easy Vegan Pumpkin Bread


1 Star2 Stars3 Stars4 Stars5 Stars (No Ratings Yet)

  • Author: Sonja Overhiser
  • Prep Time: 20 minutes
  • Cook Time: 50 minutes
  • Total Time: 1 hour 10 minutes
  • Yield: 12 slices

Description

It’s moist, fluffy, pumpkin-spiced, and seriously cozy. Yes, this easy vegan pumpkin bread will change your life (we think).


Ingredients

  • 2 flax eggs (2 tablespoons ground flax seed + 5 tablespoons water)
  • 1 cup pumpkin puree
  • 1/4 cup maple syrup
  • 1/2 cup neutral oil
  • 1 tablespoon vanilla extract
  • 1 1/2 cups all-purpose flour
  • 1/2 cup sugar
  • 2 teaspoons baking powder
  • 1 teaspoon baking soda
  • 3/4 teaspoon kosher salt
  • 1 1/2 tablespoons Pumpkin Pie Spice (purchased or homemade)
  • 1/4 cup roasted salted pepitas, for garnish

Instructions

  1. Preheat the oven to 375 degrees.  Grease a 9-inch bread pan with coconut oil or oil.
  2. Start the flax eggs (let them soak for 15 minutes while you prepare the next ingredients).
  3. In a bowl, whisk together the pumpkin puree, maple syrup, oil, and vanilla.
  4. In separate bowl, whisk together the flour, sugar, baking powder, baking soda, kosher salt, and pumpkin pie spice.
  5. When the flax egg is done, whisk it into the bowl with the liquids. Then slowly mix in the dry ingredients until just combined and smooth (don’t over stir). Pour the batter into the bread pan. Sprinkle with pepitas and pat them down gently.
  6. Bake 50 minutes, until a toothpick comes out clean. Allow to cool in the pan until room temperature. Run a knife around the edges and invert. Slice into pieces and serve. Stores for about 3 days at room temperature (keep on a cutting board and cover with a towel) or freeze in slices for a few months.

  • Category: Bread
  • Method: Baked
  • Cuisine: American

Keywords: Vegan Pumpkin Bread, Best Pumpkin Bread, Easy Pumpkin Bread, Pumpkin Bread Recipe

More pumpkin recipes? 

Gotta make all the pumpkin! Here are a few of our favorite pumpkin recipes we’d recommend:

A Couple Cooks - Healthy, Whole Food, Vegetarian Recipes

How to Make Pumpkin Pie Spice at Home

Picture this: It’s the weekend and you’re baking a pie, not because you have company coming over, just for fun. You’re wearing a thick sweater, thicker socks, and you turn on the oven. While that heats up, you gather ingredients: flour, sugar, eggs, pu…

Picture this: It’s the weekend and you’re baking a pie, not because you have company coming over, just for fun. You’re wearing a thick sweater, thicker socks, and you turn on the oven. While that heats up, you gather ingredients: flour, sugar, eggs, pumpkin puree and—oh no. You’re out of pumpkin pie spice. But don’t worry: We can fix this!


What Is Pumpkin Pie Spice?

Pumpkin pie spice is a cozy, earthy, mildly kicky American spice blend (that, just to be clear, contains absolutely no pumpkin). Odds are, several of the components are already in your pantry. The ingredient list leans heavily on baking spices, such as cinnamon, nutmeg, cloves, and ginger, but the specifics depend on the brand. Let’s review a few for inspiration:

Read More >>