Everything You Need to Know About Taro

Every week we get Down & Dirty, in which we break down our favorite unique seasonal fruits, vegetables, and more.
Today: Get to know a tropical tuber you might have been missing out on. Read More >>

Every week we get Down & Dirty, in which we break down our favorite unique seasonal fruits, vegetables, and more.

Today: Get to know a tropical tuber you might have been missing out on.

Read More >>

The Funky, Flavorful Side Dishes to Complete Any Korean Meal

“Banchan is very important to me,” says Sunny Lee, who leads the banchan program at the Korean restaurant Insa in Brooklyn, New York. “It has a very long history in Korea.”

Banchan means side dish in Korean, but in reality it’s a bunch of small dishes…

"Banchan is very important to me," says Sunny Lee, who leads the banchan program at the Korean restaurant Insa in Brooklyn, New York. "It has a very long history in Korea."

Banchan means side dish in Korean, but in reality it's a bunch of small dishes filled to the brim with pickles and the like that scatter the table at lunch or dinner. And if you've ever eaten at a Korean barbecue restaurant, or somewhere more traditional, you'll know them by their multitude, and that they all somehow fit together: often different kimchis and beans, or sprouts and tiny fish to snack on before and with a meal. I asked Sunny, and Michael Stokes, Insa's chef de cuisine, to give me a lowdown on banchan, and how its history details much of Korea's itself.

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Marjoram Is the Most Underrated Herb, Period

Every week we get Down & Dirty, in which we break down our favorite unique seasonal fruits, vegetables, and more.
Today: We’ve been stocking up on fresh herbs to get our spring fix. Next up, marjoram. Read More >>

Every week we get Down & Dirty, in which we break down our favorite unique seasonal fruits, vegetables, and more.

Today: We've been stocking up on fresh herbs to get our spring fix. Next up, marjoram.

Read More >>

There’s a Major Recall of Salad Mixes Right Now

I hate to be the bearer of bad news but, there’s been another recall. The good news is that all of these recalls are proof that the right systems are in place to detect recalls and alert consumers. The bad news is, this time, it affects Dole salad mixe…

I hate to be the bearer of bad news but, there’s been another recall. The good news is that all of these recalls are proof that the right systems are in place to detect recalls and alert consumers. The bad news is, this time, it affects Dole salad mixes. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reports that there is not one, but two, separate Listeria outbreaks linked to packaged salad mixes, one of which includes Dole and the other Fresh Express. So far, there have been 17 illnesses reported, 12 hospitalizations, and two deaths across 13 different states.

The packaged salad mixes were sold under multiple Dole branded and private labels including Ahold, Dole, Kroger, Lidl, Little Salad Bar, Marketside, Naturally Better, Nature’s Promise, and Simply Nature. The salads include mixed greens, garden salads, Caesar kits, and other types of salads packaged in bags and clamshells. The salads all have “best if used by” dates ranging from November 30th, 2021 through January 8th, 2022. The product lot code begins with the letter “N” or “Y,” which is listed in the upper right-hand corner of the package.

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The No-Browning Way to Store Peeled Potatoes

One of the most revelatory things I learned while working as a line cook was that restaurant food is, essentially, very good reheated leftovers. Sure, proteins are seared on the spot and crème brûlée is torched to order, but everything else—risotto, pasta, green beans, soups—are made hours and days in advance. As soon as an order is fired (meaning the server tells the kitchen staff to start preparing the salads and steak tartare for table 11), everything is reheated in skillets and sizzler platters in the oven. What does this have to do with potatoes? Right. Those are prepared way in advance too.

Most mornings on the job, I was tasked with peeling pounds and pounds of russets for creamy potatoes. I would then cut the spuds with the largest restaurant-provided chef’s knife I could find and transfer them to a 22-quart container, cover them in water, and store the incredibly heavy container in the refrigerator. At that point, they would hang out, uncovered, for a few days until we were running low on mashed potatoes or hand cut French fries and it was time to make more.

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One of the most revelatory things I learned while working as a line cook was that restaurant food is, essentially, very good reheated leftovers. Sure, proteins are seared on the spot and crème brûlée is torched to order, but everything else—risotto, pasta, green beans, soups—are made hours and days in advance. As soon as an order is fired (meaning the server tells the kitchen staff to start preparing the salads and steak tartare for table 11), everything is reheated in skillets and sizzler platters in the oven. What does this have to do with potatoes? Right. Those are prepared way in advance too.

Most mornings on the job, I was tasked with peeling pounds and pounds of russets for creamy potatoes. I would then cut the spuds with the largest restaurant-provided chef’s knife I could find and transfer them to a 22-quart container, cover them in water, and store the incredibly heavy container in the refrigerator. At that point, they would hang out, uncovered, for a few days until we were running low on mashed potatoes or hand cut French fries and it was time to make more.

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Charred tomatoes with cold yoghurt (Ottolenghi)

This post has been updated as of September 2021 For the perfect end of summer meal, we recently made this charred tomato dish from Ottolenghi’s cookbook, Simple*. We made flatbreads from my book and some hummus to have with the tomato dish & …

This post has been updated as of September 2021 For the perfect end of summer meal, we recently made this charred tomato dish from Ottolenghi’s cookbook, Simple*. We made flatbreads from my book and some hummus to have with the tomato dish & some grilled vegetables too. If you’re familiar with Ottolenghi’s recipes, you know …

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The post Charred tomatoes with cold yoghurt (Ottolenghi) appeared first on Izy Hossack - Top With Cinnamon.

24 Brilliant & Definitely Not Bitter Brussels Sprouts Recipes

We’re about to turn orange. And no, it’s not because we’re nervous or embarrassed; it’s not because we’re stressed about planning that gigantic meal for next week. It’s because we’re eating way too many sweet potatoes, squashes, pumpkins, and carrots.&…

We're about to turn orange. And no, it's not because we're nervous or embarrassed; it's not because we're stressed about planning that gigantic meal for next week. It's because we're eating way too many sweet potatoes, squashes, pumpkins, and carrots

It's time to get some green back in our lives; it's time to eat more brussels sprouts. And it's time to start thinking about the ones you'll serve on Thanksgiving. A basic Brussels sprouts recipe would likely call for arranging the greens on a sheet pan, sprouts cut side down, drizzling them with olive oil, and roasting them in the oven for 20 minutes to 30 minutes, or until they’re golden brown. Season the cooked Brussels sprouts with a little bit more salt and pepper, maybe some Parmesan cheese or red pepper flakes, and call it a day.

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38 Sweet Potato Recipes That Bring All the Fall Feels

Sweet potatoes: they’re the tubers (well, really the morning glory) that never fail you. They go to bat in recipes both savory and sweet, transitioning seamlessly from airy soufflés to stick-to-your-rib chilis to toasty waffles (seriously, give them a …

Sweet potatoes: they're the tubers (well, really the morning glory) that never fail you. They go to bat in recipes both savory and sweet, transitioning seamlessly from airy soufflés to stick-to-your-rib chilis to toasty waffles (seriously, give them a go). Hearty, versatile, and colorful, sweet potatoes never fail to bring cheer and are just what you need to get through the wintry slush.

You probably have one or two in your pantry right now, lingering, ever hopeful, and ready to be your next dinner. Or dessert. Or breakfast! If you don't, now's the time to stock up, because we've got 38 recipes to keep in your back pocket—sweet, savory, and in-between—all winter long.

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It’s Time to Plant Your Fall Vegetable Garden—Here’s How

If you have free space in your garden beds or empty containers, it’s still early enough to plant for a fall harvest. Vegetable gardening in the fall is often more successful than in the spring or summer because you are up against fewer odds: weed growt…

If you have free space in your garden beds or empty containers, it’s still early enough to plant for a fall harvest. Vegetable gardening in the fall is often more successful than in the spring or summer because you are up against fewer odds: weed growth slows down, the plants are under less heat stress, there’s more rain, and many garden pests are also (temporarily) gone. While you can certainly do a thorough end-of-seasoning gardening cleanup (and you should!) you can also make use of your fertile ground for a harvest-timed harvest.

Read on for the best ways to leverage the last of the pre-winter weather for a successful fall vegetable garden.

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How to Take a Cheese Plate on the Go

Whether you’re camping, road-tripping, picnicking, or spending time at the beach, a cheese plate by your side is always a welcome snack. I might be biased, but I love enjoying a plethora of great cheese and cured meat in any scenery, all year round. Ho…

Whether you’re camping, road-tripping, picnicking, or spending time at the beach, a cheese plate by your side is always a welcome snack. I might be biased, but I love enjoying a plethora of great cheese and cured meat in any scenery, all year round. However, my typical, carefully designed plates aren’t exactly simple to transport, especially when planning to enjoy them on the go. To keep your beautiful, cheesy creations intact outside the confines of your home, here are six tips.

1. Pick a Secure Base

When you’re out and about, forget about fancy platters or boards. I like to build my cheese plate directly in a wide reusable container or to-go box (you can even find boxes made specifically for this use). This way, everything is packed in and ready to eat once you arrive at your destination. It takes some extra work to bring all of the items separately to build on the spot, so arranging the plate beforehand saves a lot of time and eliminates the need for excess supplies, like a cutting board, sharp knife, and extra food packaging.

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