Pork carnitas ribs

Pork carnitas ribs are slowly cooked in a citrus and garlic glaze until the meat is savory, tangy, and rich, much like its Tex-Mex namesake.
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Pork carnitas ribs are slowly cooked in a citrus and garlic glaze until the meat is savory, tangy, and rich, much like its Tex-Mex namesake.

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Lemon Ricotta Cookies

Tangy lemon ricotta cookies are topped with a sweet and tart lemon glaze that creates the perfect summer cookie for any occasion. I was recently reminded that the first time I made these cookies, Elle was only 6 months old. Now she’s 8. 8 years old! Time is a thief.  As this school year comes …

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Tangy lemon ricotta cookies are topped with a sweet and tart lemon glaze that creates the perfect summer cookie for any occasion.

Glazed lemon ricotta cookies on a marble board. One of the cookies is broken in half.

I was recently reminded that the first time I made these cookies, Elle was only 6 months old.

Now she’s 8. 8 years old! Time is a thief. 

As this school year comes to an end, I am determined to embrace every moment I can of this summer with her. I know I’ll blink and she’ll be grown, but these slow summer days are full of memories we can make together.

But don’t mind me if you find me eating some of these soft lemon ricotta cookies and weeping over her 6-month photos in the meantime.

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What’s the Deal With Finger Limes?

Australian finger limes (aka citrus australasica) are one of the silliest types of citrus fruit—and we mean that in the best way possible. They resemble short, stubby fingers and bear the nickname “caviar limes.” Finger limes are a ty…

Australian finger limes (aka citrus australasica) are one of the silliest types of citrus fruit—and we mean that in the best way possible. They resemble short, stubby fingers and bear the nickname “caviar limes.” Finger limes are a type of tiny citrus fruit—a microcitrus actually—that are native to Australia (specifically the coastal region of Queensland and New South Wales). Their name comes from the fact that they are about the size and shape of a finger (they max out at around 3 inches in length), and both the peel and the pulp come in a rainbow of colors. The pulp (more properly called juice vesicles) of most citrus fruit looks like elongated teardrops, but finger lime’s vesicles are tiny little balls—a tart, fruit “caviar” that holds its shape until the beads burst in your mouth (in case their diminutive size and wide range of colors weren't enough fun for you).

Look for finger limes at specialty grocery stores—in some parts of California, you might be able to find finger limes at your farmers’ market. So how do you go about choosing the brightest, juiciest ones? Select finger limes with brightly-colored skin. Small brown patches won’t affect the flavor, but steer clear of specimens with dull, dry, shriveled skin (they’re past their prime). Like any other citrus fruit, store finger limes in the refrigerator, wrapped in plastic for a couple of weeks. If you don’t have any luck finding them locally, you can always order them online. Better yet, grow your own with the Via Citrus Finger Lime Tree from our shop. Each tree ships directly from Florida and includes clear care instructions so even novice gardeners can grow beautiful finger limes (assuming that you have a bright, sunny spot where the plant can thrive).

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Blood Orange Curd Brownies

Vibrant in both flavor and color, these blood orange brownies feature a layer of rich, fudgy chocolate brownie topped with a tart blood orange curd. Chocolate and orange are a classic combination, but not one often seen in brownies (or if it is, flavored with little more than a bit of zest or orange extract). […]

The post Blood Orange Curd Brownies first appeared on Love and Olive Oil.

Vibrant in both flavor and color, these blood orange brownies feature a layer of rich, fudgy chocolate brownie topped with a tart blood orange curd.

Chocolate and orange are a classic combination, but not one often seen in brownies (or if it is, flavored with little more than a bit of zest or orange extract). This lovely layered treat is as much about the citrus curd as it is about the brownie, resulting in a rush of flavor and luscious texture in each and every bite.

Cut squares of Blood Orange Curd Brownies topped wtih little wedges of blood orange, on parchment with whole and cut oranges around.

I first set out to make a lemon bar brownie, with a layer of tart lemon curd on top of a rich chocolate brownie. It was an unusual idea, for sure, but I was kind of excited about it, to be honest.

But Taylor has some sort of moral opposition to the combination of lemon and chocolate, why I cannot say, and managed to talk me into doing an orange version instead.

I actually made a half batch of each, one orange, one lemon, for research purposes, and brought both with me to ceramics class along with a paper to collect votes on which one everyone preferred. It was a close match, but ultimately the orange won by a single vote. And who am I to deny the people what they want?

Neat grid of Blood Orange Curd Brownies cut into squares, one piece propped up to showcase the perfectly defined layers of brownie and deeply-colored blood orange curd.

My main challenge when testing this recipe is that orange curd, unlike lemon curd, has a tendency to be somewhat bland tasting (especially when you are comparing it bite for bite to lemon curd, which is why it surprised me that the orange version won, since it was my first batch and the orange was rather dull in comparison).

While the flavor of orange and chocolate go together beautifully, the lemon definitely had a noticeably brighter, punchier flavor. I wanted to see if I could replicate that tartness in the orange version.

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A Stunning Citrus Cake in One Bowl & One-ish Step

Every week in Genius Recipes—often with your help!—Food52 Founding Editor and lifelong Genius-hunter Kristen Miglore is unearthing recipes that will change the way you cook.

This cake will stun you—with its sunshiny looks, the burst of citrus in eve…

Every week in Genius Recipes—often with your help!—Food52 Founding Editor and lifelong Genius-hunter Kristen Miglore is unearthing recipes that will change the way you cook.


This cake will stun you—with its sunshiny looks, the burst of citrus in every swirl and crumb, but, maybe most of all, for what it doesn’t ask of you.

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Quick One Bowl Lemon Loaf Cake

Quick One Bowl Lemon Loaf Cake
I love it when I have lots of time to devote to baking up elaborate desserts, but most of the time I appreciate a baked good that comes together quickly and easily. After all – I always have time for something easy to put together, don’t you? This Quick One Bowl Lemon Loaf …

The post Quick One Bowl Lemon Loaf Cake appeared first on Baking Bites.

Quick One Bowl Lemon Loaf Cake
I love it when I have lots of time to devote to baking up elaborate desserts, but most of the time I appreciate a baked good that comes together quickly and easily. After all – I always have time for something easy to put together, don’t you? This Quick One Bowl Lemon Loaf Cake couldn’t be easier to put together. It mixes up in one bowl and takes a bit less than an hour to bake, so you don’t have to wait long to enjoy a moist loaf cake that is bursting with lemon flavor.

The cake starts out with sugar and lemon zest. These two ingredients are whisked together to draw the lemon oils out of the zest. This gives you a more potent flavor than simply stirring zest directly into your batter. The other ingredients are added to the lemony sugar, including a generous amount of fresh lemon juice to add more citrus flavor, as well as buttermilk to tenderize and enrich the batter. I also added a splash of vanilla extract to add a hint of floral sweetness to the cake.

I often get asked how many lemons are needed for this recipe. The answer is that it depends on your lemons. At the peak of citrus season, lemons are bursting with juice and you might get away with just two large lemons. Other times, you may need four or more lemons to get as much juice as you need. When in doubt, be sure to have an extra lemon or two on hand! Fresh lemon is the key to getting the best flavor in this recipe, since you need both the juice and the zest.

After baking, the cake is topped with a lemon glaze that bumps up the citrus flavor and adds an additional bit of sweetness to each piece. You can skip the glaze if you prefer a plain cake, but it really adds a nice punch. To dress up the cake, top the glaze with a handful of yellow sprinkles or even some coarse sanding sugar for a bit of sparkle!

Quick One Bowl Lemon Loaf Cake

Quick One Bowl Lemon Loaf Cake
1 cup sugar
1 tablespoon lemon zest (1 lemon)
2 large eggs
1/3 cup vegetable oil
1 tsp vanilla extract
1/2 cup buttermilk
1/2 cup fresh lemon juice
2 1/2 cups all purpose flour
1 1/2 tsp baking powder
1/2 tsp baking soda
1/2 tsp salt

Glaze
1 cup powdered sugar
1 to 2 tbsp fresh lemon juice

Preheat oven to 350F. Line a 9×5-inch loaf pan with parchment paper and lightly grease.
In a large bowl, combine sugar and lemon zest and beat with an electric mixer for about 1 minute, releasing the lemon oils from the zest.
Blend eggs, vegetable oil and vanilla extract into sugar mixture. Blend in buttermilk and lemon juice. Add in flour, baking powder, baking soda and salt, then whisk until batter is uniform and no streaks of dry ingredients remain. Pour into prepared pan.
Bake for 45-50 minutes, until a toothpick inserted into the center of the cake comes out clean, or with only a few moist crumbs attached.
Let the cake to cool in the pan for at least 15-20 minutes. Then, use the parchment paper to lift out the cake and transfer it to a wire rack to cool completely before glazing.

To make the glaze, combine glaze ingredients in a small bowl and whisk until smooth. Start with 1 tablespoon of lemon juice and gradually add in a second until the glaze has a thick, yet pourable, consistency. Pour over cooled cake.

Makes 1 cake; serves 10.

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2 Bright, Citrusy Margaritas to Level Up Your Winter Cocktails

We’ve teamed up with 1800® Tequila to celebrate National Margarita Day the only way we know how: shaking up some cocktails with top-notch tequila, of course. Their premium tequilas range from the smooth, silky añejo 1800 Cristalino to the classic 1800 …

We’ve teamed up with 1800® Tequila to celebrate National Margarita Day the only way we know how: shaking up some cocktails with top-notch tequila, of course. Their premium tequilas range from the smooth, silky añejo 1800 Cristalino to the classic 1800 Blanco—both equally perfect for making delicious margaritas.


As a born Southerner, I have to go above and beyond to survive winters in the Northeast. In my hometown of Atlanta, winter— if you can even call it that—is suuuper mild. But in Boston, my home of five years, this season is serious business. Up here, winter means a full-time commitment to proper layering, periodical snow shoveling (admittedly, my husband does most of this, so shout out to him), and tasty pick-me-ups to remind me of warmer days.

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Too Many Lemons? 38 Recipes to Make Right Now

Bright, tangy lemons might evoke images of poolside cocktails or a kid’s neighborhood business venture, but citrus season comes with the end-of-year chill. Starting in December, lemons hang like ornaments from small, dark green trees, ready to brighten…

Bright, tangy lemons might evoke images of poolside cocktails or a kid’s neighborhood business venture, but citrus season comes with the end-of-year chill. Starting in December, lemons hang like ornaments from small, dark green trees, ready to brighten up holiday dishes and treats.

We hardly need to tell you how many ways you can use lemon juice, zest, or rinds. From baked fish to creamy pasta and fluffy meringue, little lemons pack a mighty, refreshing punch. Their sourness stars in sauces and creams, and supports hearty stews and salty dressings. Plus, they add much-needed acid to pastas and poultry. So, if you’re looking for some lemony inspiration, here are 19 recipes to get you started.

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Cranberry Bliss Bars

If you find yourself counting down the days until you can get your hands on Cranberry Bliss Bars, this copycat recipe is exactly what you need to enjoy them at home any time of the year. I used to count down the days until I could buy the Starbucks Cranberry Bliss Bar. But now I …

The post Cranberry Bliss Bars appeared first on My Baking Addiction.

If you find yourself counting down the days until you can get your hands on Cranberry Bliss Bars, this copycat recipe is exactly what you need to enjoy them at home any time of the year.

Three cranberry bliss bars arranged on a white plate, with a bite taken out of one of them

I used to count down the days until I could buy the Starbucks Cranberry Bliss Bar. But now I have my own recipe, and honestly, it’s even better!

Cranberry is such a wonderful flavor that deserves more attention all year long. I’m not complaining about it getting its due in winter, though.

The flavors in these cranberry bars are similar to another copycat recipe of mine, glazed orange scones, as well as my cranberry orange bread and cranberry orange cinnamon rolls.

What can I say, I love the combo of cranberry and orange!

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