Lemon Yoghurt Pot Cake (Eggless)

Using an empty yoghurt pot as a measuring tool is a genius hack to do when you don’t have any kitchen scales! It’s all about the proportions of ingredients here so I’ve given the recipe in ‘pots’ (1 pot being a 100ml yoghurt pot) but also in weights for those who do have kitchen scales. Lemon cake is always a strong favourite of mine and here it’s made extra moist with the addition of yoghurt, ground almonds and a good soaking of lemon syrup. That little extra step of pouring zippy lemon syrup over a hot cake is really what lights this cake up. You get an excellent flavour from it with that sweet-sour tang, plus a syrupy moistness throughout the loaf.

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eggless lemon yoghurt pot cake with a slice cut on a plate

Using an empty yoghurt pot as a measuring tool is a genius hack to do when you don’t have any kitchen scales! It’s all about the proportions of ingredients here so I’ve given the recipe in ‘pots’ (1 pot being a 100ml yoghurt pot) but also in weights for those who do have kitchen scales.

eggless lemon cake sliced on a plate

Lemon cake is always a strong favourite of mine and here it’s made extra moist with the addition of yoghurt, ground almonds and a good soaking of lemon syrup. That little extra step of pouring zippy lemon syrup over a hot cake is really what lights this cake up. You get an excellent flavour from it with that sweet-sour tang, plus a syrupy moistness throughout the loaf.

Lemon Yoghurt Pot Cake (Eggless)

Lemon Yoghurt Pot Cake (Eggless)

Yield: 1 loaf cake
Prep Time: 15 minutes
Cook Time: 50 minutes
Total Time: 1 hour 5 minutes

Ingredients

  • a (100g) pot of honey yoghurt
  • 1 pot (100ml) water
  • 1 pot (100ml) light olive oil
  • 2 pots (200g) granulated sugar
  • zest of 2 lemons, finely grated
  • 3 pots (175g) plain white flour
  • 2 pots (90g) ground almonds
  • 1 tsp baking powder
  • 1/4 tsp bicarbonate of soda
  • 1/4 tsp fine table salt
  • Syrup:
  • 1 pot (100g) granulated sugar
  • 3/4 pot (70ml) lemon juice

Instructions

  1. Line a 2lb loaf tin with baking paper. Preheat the oven to 180C (350F) fan or 200C (400F) non-fan.
  2. Empty the contents of the 100g yoghurt pot into a medium bowl. Rinse the yoghurt pot out and dry it - you can now use it as a measuring tool for the rest of the recipe (or stick to the weights given if you prefer).
  3. To the bowl of yoghurt add the water, oil, sugar and lemon zest.
  4. Add in the flour, ground almonds, baking powder, bicarbonate of soda and salt. Stir until you get a mostly smooth batter.
  5. Pour into the loaf tin and bake for 50-60 minutes until a toothpick inserted into the centre of the cake comes out clean. It will probably sink a bit as it cools, this is okay!
  6. As the cake is cooking, combine the syrup ingredients (lemon juice and sugar) in a small pot. Bring to the boil on the stove over a medium-low heat. Simmer for 2-3 minutes until slightly reduced and syrupy.
  7. Poke holes in the baked cake while it is still hot and in the loaf tin. Pour the syrup all over the warm cake and leave to cool before removing from the tin, slicing and serving.

Notes

Vegan option: use a dairy-free, soy-based yoghurt here.

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Eton Mess Tart

As soon as strawberries come into season in the UK, I’m ALL OVER THEM. It’s usually starting to get warm outside (although as I’m writing this my view is of a very grey sky), so a strawberry-heavy dessert like Eton mess is my idea of heaven. I have such strong memories of having it at primary school, served unglamorously in plastic cups, when we would have our annual ‘sports day’. It was effectively the last day of school so even though there was sports involved (gross), the fact that it was almost summer holidays made the day filled with so much excitement. Now, Eton mess isn’t the most beautiful dessert ever – strawberries, raspberries and crushed meringues folded into whipped cream will never look stunning. It was apparently borne out of someone dropping a meringue on the floor, it shattering, and them deciding to serve it anyway so you get the idea. But if you take those flavours and add them to a different dessert you can get a beautiful result. There are so many variations on Eton mess you could make by taking those basic flavours to make something else delicious. Here I made an Eton mess tart, using […]

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Eton mess tart with strawberries, raspberries and torched meringue

As soon as strawberries come into season in the UK, I’m ALL OVER THEM. It’s usually starting to get warm outside (although as I’m writing this my view is of a very grey sky), so a strawberry-heavy dessert like Eton mess is my idea of heaven.

A slice of Eton mess tart on a pink scalloped plate

I have such strong memories of having it at primary school, served unglamorously in plastic cups, when we would have our annual ‘sports day’. It was effectively the last day of school so even though there was sports involved (gross), the fact that it was almost summer holidays made the day filled with so much excitement.

Now, Eton mess isn’t the most beautiful dessert ever – strawberries, raspberries and crushed meringues folded into whipped cream will never look stunning. It was apparently borne out of someone dropping a meringue on the floor, it shattering, and them deciding to serve it anyway so you get the idea. But if you take those flavours and add them to a different dessert you can get a beautiful result. There are so many variations on Eton mess you could make by taking those basic flavours to make something else delicious.

Multiple slices of eton mess tart on pink plates

Here I made an Eton mess tart, using an enriched pastry which I rolled out ‘galette style’ so you don’t need a fluted tart tin to make it. The pastry is baked alone so it gets crisp and flaky. It’s then topped with whipped cream, berries and blobs of meringue ‘frosting’ which are torched.

The enriched pastry uses up the egg yolks that would be leftover from making the meringue so you don’t have random yolks sitting around in the fridge. But why even add eggs to pastry? The yolks help bind it together and, because of the fat content, keep it tender by preventing some gluten formation in the dough. You also get that slight yellow tinge to the pastry which can make it look even more appealing.

If you’re more up for a standard Eton mess recipe, I also did one for Food52 a while ago which you can check out here. Otherwise, I hope you enjoy this tart recipe!

Eton Mess Tart

Eton Mess Tart

Yield: serves 8-10
Prep Time: 30 minutes
Cook Time: 25 minutes
Additional Time: 1 hour
Total Time: 1 hour 55 minutes

Ingredients

Pastry:

  • 240g (2 cups) plain white flour (all-purpose flour)
  • 90g (3/4 cup) wholemeal (whole wheat) pastry flour
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 200g (7 ounces) unsalted butter, cold, cubed
  • 2 egg yolks (save the whites)
  • 100-125ml (6-8 tablespoons) cold water

Meringue:

  • 2 egg whites
  • 100g (1/2 cup) granulated sugar

Toppings:

  • 150ml (2/3 cup) double cream (heavy cream)
  • 125ml (1/2 cup) plain yogurt
  • 2 tbsp icing sugar (powdered sugar)
  • 200g (7 ounces) strawberries
  • 100g (3.5 ounces) raspberries

Instructions

Make the pastry:

  1. Place both the flours and salt into a large bowl. Add the cold butter and toss to coat the cubes in flour. Use your fingertips to rub the butter into the flour until you have a mostly sandy/breadcrumb texture with some pea-sized lumps of butter remaining. (You can also do this by pulsing the same ingredients in a food processor)
  2. Add the egg yolks and about half of the water. Start to bring it together with your fingertips, gently kneading. Drizzle in more water as needed, a tablespoon at a time, until the dough starts to stick together and feels slightly moist but not sticky.
  3. Smush the dough together into one big ball with your hands then flatten it into a disk shape. Place in a resealable sandwich bag and chill for 1 hour so it can rest.

Shape and bake:

  1. Let the chilled dough warm at room temp. for a few minutes so it softens slightly. Line a large baking tray with baking paper.
  2. Dust the pastry lightly with flour and roll it out into a circle about 35cm (14 inches) in diameter. It doesn't matter if it is slightly larger than the baking tray at this point. Roll up the pastry around the rolling pin, then unroll over the lined baking sheet.
  3. Roll and tuck the outer 5cm (2 inch) border of the circle under itself to neaten the edge and create a thicker crust, a bit like a pizza! NOTE: You may need to trim the edges of the pastry before rolling up to get it to fit onto the baking tray properly.
  4. Now crimp the edge of the pastry all the way around with your fingertips (see video above for how to do it) OR use the tines of a fork to make impressions all the way around the edge.
  5. Prick the centre of the pastry all over with a fork to prevent it bubbling up when it bakes.
  6. Chill the pastry for 10-15 minutes as your oven preheats to 190 C (170 C fan / 375 F).
  7. Bake for 25-30 minutes until golden brown. Keep an eye on it and use a metal spatula to press down any big air bubbles that may form as it bakes.
  8. Let the crust cool before filling.

Meringue:

  1. Combine the egg whites and sugar in a medium, heatproof bowl. Set over a pot of simmering water making sure the bottom of the bowl isn't touching the water.
  2. Stir constantly until the sugar has dissolved (the mixture shouldn’t feel gritty when you rub some between your fingertips) and registers 71 C (160 F ) on a thermometer.
  3. Remove the bowl from the pan and use electric beaters to whisk until cool, very fluffy and thickened - you should be able to lift up the beaters and form stiff peaks in the mixture which do not sink back into the meringue. Transfer to a piping bag fitted with a wide plain tip (or you can dollop it with a spoon if you don't have piping bags).

Assemble:

  1. When you're ready to serve: Whip the double cream in a large bowl with a whisk until thickened. Fold in the yogurt and icing sugar.
  2. Prep the berries by removing any stalks and cutting up larger berries into slices.
  3. Spread the whipped yogurt cream over the pastry. Top with the berries. Pipe on (or spoon on) blobs of meringue all over. If you have a blowtorch you can use it to toast the meringue blobs but it's not necessary.
  4. Serve!

Notes

MAKE IT EASIER:

  • you can use ready made shortcrust pastry for this recipe if you'd like. You'll need about 350g (12 ounces) of pastry. You can go with plain or 'dessert' shortcrust..
  • If you don't want to make the meringue yourself you can buy the meringues from the shops, usually in the baking aisle. Just crumble them up and scatter over the tart.
  • Alternatively, could buy marshmallow fluff and pipe dollops of that all over the tart and torch it, instead of making meringue.

MAKE AHEAD:

This Eton mess tart is best assembled just before eating as the crust can go soggy if it sits around with the toppings on it. You can pre-bake the crust, whip the cream, prep the berries & meringue. Then when you're ready to eat, just layer it up and serve!

Have you made this recipe?
I’d love to see how it went! Tag me on instagram @izyhossack and hashtag it #topwithcinnamon so I can have a look & reshare in my stories!

eton mess tart with whipped cream, strawberries, raspberries and meringue

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Yogurt Brûlée with berries & granola

Tangy yogurt layered with crisp granola and fresh fruit, plus a chance to pull out the blowtorch at breakfast time? HELL YES. Meet the yogurt brûlée – your new favourite brunch dish.

The post Yogurt Brûlée with berries & granola appeared first on Izy Hossack – Top With Cinnamon.

A glass with layers of yoghurt brulee, fruit and granola

Tangy yogurt layered with crisp granola and fresh fruit, plus a chance to pull out the blowtorch at breakfast time? HELL YES. Meet the yogurt brûlée – your new favourite brunch dish.

Three layered yoghurt brulees with berries and a jar of granola
A jar with layers of yoghurt, berries and granola

I’ve never really been a fan of custard-based desserts (I mean, except ice cream but that’s a whole different ballgame really), I think mainly due to the texture. I can’t abide by a fully smooth dessert! I need crispy, crunchy bits and texture to get my teeth into. Creme brûlée is edging on acceptable but still, the crisp layer on top is never enough for me.

This yogurt brûlée is my version of an ideal brûlée. There are layers of toasty granola, with coconut and seeds for extra crunch, which I make on the stove top in 10 minutes (very much a win). Then fresh berries which I eat in abundance exclusively when they’re in season (which makes me appreciate them even more!). Then plain yogurt – no need to have the hassle of making a custard and worrying about it splitting. No water bath needed. You just have to assemble the lot and go.

The fact these are so easy to make means they are an excellent brunch dish to serve to a crowd. They look hella fancy but, in reality, are made of bog-standard ingredients with little prep needed.

Three jars of layered yoghurt with brulee tops, fruit and granola

The sugar layer on top which is brûléed (is that a real verb?) is a light brown sugar for its golden colour – when I tried granulated sugar on these basically nothing happened!

The sugar melts and caramelises slightly but, in my experience, doesn’t get crisp. I think mainly due to the yogurt being wetter than a custard so it readily dissolves the sugar. It is purely there to sweeten the whole dish and add the caramelised flavour. Luckily all the other textures in this parfait make up for any sugar crunch which is lacking.

If you’re feeling even more *extra*, add a few edible flowers to the top of your yogurt brûlées before serving!

Yogurt Brûlée with Berries & Granola

Yogurt Brûlée with Berries & Granola

Yield: serves 4
Prep Time: 5 minutes
Cook Time: 10 minutes
Total Time: 15 minutes

Ingredients

  • 200g (8 ounces) mixed berries (I used strawberries and raspberries)
  • 400g (scant 2 cups) natural yoghurt (plain yogurt)
  • 2 tablespoons light brown sugar
  • 3/4 cup (80g) Stovetop granola (recipe below) or your favourite granola

Instructions

  1. Prep your berries: remove any stems and cut larger fruit up into bite-sized pieces.
  2. Take 4 clean jars or drinking glasses (roughly 200ml / 8 ounce capacity). Place a layer of granola at the bottom of the jar (about 1 tablespoon), top with a few pieces of fruit and then a layer of yoghurt (about 2 tablespoons). Repeat this layering of granola, fruit, yoghurt twice more so you have 3 layers of each component in each jar.
  3. Sprinkle 1/2 tablespoon of light brown sugar over the yoghurt in an even layer. Use a blowtorch to melt and caramelise the sugar layer on top (see notes for if you don't have a blowtorch)

Notes

  • If you don't have a blow torch: assemble the layered brûlée in ovenproof ramekins instead of jars. Place on a tray, sprinkle with the sugar, then place under the grill (broiler) in your oven on the highest rack and leave until the sugar has melted and is bubbling - this will happen quickly so keep an eye on it.

Stovetop Granola

Stovetop Granola

Yield: 2 cups
Prep Time: 5 minutes
Cook Time: 10 minutes
Total Time: 15 minutes

Ingredients

  • 120g (1 1/2 cups) old fashioned oats
  • 20g (1/2 cup) coconut flakes (a.k.a chips)
  • 4 tablespoons mixed seeds
  • 2 tablespoons unsalted butter or refined olive oil
  • 4 tablespoons maple syrup

Instructions

  1. Tip the oats, coconut flakes and mixed seeds into a large frying pan/skillet. Place this over a medium heat on the stove and dry toast, stirring often, until it starts to smell toasty and nutty.
  2. Turn the heat down to low, make a hole in the centre of the oats and place the butter (or olive oil) and maple syrup in the hole. Let the butter melt (if using) then stir everything together so all of the oats are coated with the fat and syrup.
  3. Toast over a low heat, stirring constantly for another 2 minutes to help it crisp up - the texture will still be quite soft but as it cools it will harden.
  4. Tip the granola out onto a large plate or tray and set aside to cool and get crispy.

NOTE: this makes excess granola so once cooled, store in an airtight jar.

A glass with layers of yoghurt brulee, fruit and granola

Have you made this recipe?
I’d love to see how it went! Tag me on instagram @izyhossack and hashtag it #topwithcinnamon so I can have a look & reshare in my stories!

The post Yogurt Brûlée with berries & granola appeared first on Izy Hossack - Top With Cinnamon.