Jerk Seasoned Collard Greens

When lockdown started a few months ago I focused on buying vegetables that would last a long time in my fridge or pantry so I could continue to eat a well rounded plate without having to go to the grocery store often. Collard greens are one of the first things I bought. They hold up […]

The post Jerk Seasoned Collard Greens appeared first on Budget Bytes.

When lockdown started a few months ago I focused on buying vegetables that would last a long time in my fridge or pantry so I could continue to eat a well rounded plate without having to go to the grocery store often. Collard greens are one of the first things I bought. They hold up well in the fridge, they’re inexpensive, and I just loooooove them! When I made that first pot of collard greens I looked in my pantry for something to season them with and pulled out a bottle of jerk seasoning on a whim. I couldn’t believe how incredible the flavors were together, and I knew that these Jerk Seasoned Collard Greens were something I was going to need to share on the blog.

Interesting in knowing what other fruits and vegetables last a long time? Check out my round up of Long Lasting Produce to Stock Up on During Isolation (including recipes ideas for each)!

Collard Greens on a plate with Mac and Cheese and BBQ Chicken

What is Jerk Seasoning?

If you’ve never heard of Jerk seasoning, it’s an amazing spicy, sweet, and savory blend of herbs and spices used for jerk style cooking in Jamaica. Jerk marinades usually consist of a mix fresh ingredients like Scotch Bonnet peppers, onions, ginger, scallions, allspice, garlic, thyme, among other ingredients. The flavorful marinade is slathered all over chicken, beef, pork, fish, or vegetables, then they’re cooked over an open flame to perfection. For this recipe, I simmered my collard greens in a broth seasoned with a dry jerk seasoning and a touch of orange juice for sweetness. This seasoning is pretty much good on everything.

Where to Find Jerk Seasoning

You should be able to find either the wet marinade (in a jar) or a bottle of dry spices in most major grocery stores, although a dry spice mix is what I used for this recipe. Walkerswood is an authentic brand from Jamaica that makes both the wet marinade and dry spice mix and it’s available for purchase on their website, on Amazon, and in many large grocery chains like Kroger. Or, if you want to try to make your own spice mix, check out this jerk seasoning recipe from Immaculate Bites.

What to Serve with Jerk Seasoned Collard Greens?

The unique sweet-savory-spicy flavor of these collard greens makes them a match for a variety of dishes. For some reason, I really love them with mac and cheese and ate them throughout the first few weeks of lock down just piled on top of a bowl of mac. In the photo above, I have them paired with Quick BBQ Chicken and Mac and Cheese. They’d also go great with other southern comfort foods, like potato salad, cornbread, or even something like red beans and rice.

How to Store Leftover Collard Greens

These simmered collard greens are one of those things that tastes even better the next day. Make sure to store your collard greens with the leftover broth from the pot, so they can continue to marinate in all that flavor in the refrigerator. You can reheat the leftovers (with the broth) either in a sauce pot on the stove over medium, stirring often, or microwaved until hot. Just strain the greens out of the broth for serving (use a slotted spoon to lift them out of the broth).

Jerk seasoned collard greens in a red pot, onion and garlic on the side

 
jerk seasoned collard greens on a plate with mac and cheese and bbq chicken

Jerk Seasoned Collard Greens

Sweet, spicy, and savory, these Jerk Seasoned Collard Greens are a hearty and flavorful side dish that also makes great leftovers!
Total Cost $4.10 recipe / $0.51 serving
Prep Time 5 minutes
Cook Time 35 minutes
Total Time 40 minutes
Servings 8 ¾ cup each
Calories 51.94kcal
Author Beth - Budget Bytes

Ingredients

  • 1 yellow onion $0.32
  • 1 clove garlic $0.16
  • 1 Tbsp cooking oil $0.04
  • 2 tsp jerk seasoning $0.20
  • 1/2 cup orange juice $0.52
  • 3 cups chicken broth $0.36
  • 1 lb. chopped collard greens $2.50

Instructions

  • Slice the onion and mince the garlic. Add the onion, garlic, and cooking oil to a large pot. Sauté the onion and garlic over medium heat until the onions are soft and translucent (about 5 minutes).
  • Add the jerk seasoning, orange juice, chicken broth, and collard greens to the pot. Stir to combine. Place a lid on the pot, turn the heat up to medium-high, and allow the broth to come up to a boil.
  • Once boiling, turn the heat down to medium-low and let the collard greens simmer, stirring occasionally, until they are tender (about 30 minutes, or to your liking). Keep the lid in place when not stirring. Serve hot.

Nutrition

Serving: 0.75cup | Calories: 51.94kcal | Carbohydrates: 7.43g | Protein: 2.46g | Fat: 2.15g | Sodium: 385.44mg | Fiber: 2.65g

Scroll down for the step by step photos!

A ladle full of Jerk Seasoned Collard Greens hovering over the pot

How to Make Jerk Seasoned Collard Greens – Step by Step Photos

Onions and garlic in a pot with oil

Slice one yellow onion and mince one clove of garlic (if you prefer not to have large pieces of onion, you can finely mince the onion instead). Add the onion and garlic to a large pot with 1 Tbsp cooking oil and sauté over medium heat until the onions are soft and translucent (about 5 minutes).

Jerk seasoning in the pot with onions, orange juice being poured in

Add 2 tsp jerk seasoning, ½ cup orange juice, and 3 cups chicken broth to the pot with the onions and garlic.

Collard greens added to the pot

Add one pound chopped collard greens to the pot. I used collard greens that come in a bag, pre-washed and chopped. If you’re chopping your own, make sure to wash them well, cut the stems out, then chop into strips.

Simmered collard greens in the pot

Stir everything to combine, place a lid on the pot, turn the heat up to medium-high, and allow the broth to come up to a boil. Once it reaches a boil, turn the heat down to low and let the collard greens simmer until tender, stirring occasionally. I let my collard greens simmer for 30 minutes, but you can simmer for more or less time depending on how tender you like your greens.

A spoon lifting some jerk seasoned collard greens out of the pot

Serve the jerk seasoned collard greens hot, with a slotted spoon to let the broth drain away. 

The post Jerk Seasoned Collard Greens appeared first on Budget Bytes.

Bronx Cocktail

Not as famous as its “other borough” cousin, the Manhattan, the Bronx is a fruitier, lighter alternative to the rough-and-tumbler whiskey-based cocktail. However one sip and you may find yourself visiting the Bronx a little more often!
Con…

Not as famous as its “other borough” cousin, the Manhattan, the Bronx is a fruitier, lighter alternative to the rough-and-tumbler whiskey-based cocktail. However one sip and you may find yourself visiting the Bronx a little more often!

Continue Reading Bronx Cocktail...

Orange Cookies with Sweet Orange Glaze

These soft, buttery orange cookies are flavored with orange zest and orange juice, and iced with a sweet orange glaze. Their old-fashioned flavor will remind you of your grandma’s kitchen!

The post Orange Cookies with Sweet Orange Glaze appeared first on Brown Eyed Baker.

These soft, buttery orange cookies are made from scratch, flavored with orange zest and orange juice and iced with a sweet orange glaze. Their old-fashioned flavor will remind you of your grandma’s kitchen!

A stack of orange cookies with a glass of milk in the background.

Many years ago, after making a batch of Italian Easter bread, my husband asked if I had a recipe for orange cookies. Specifically, the soft, chewy kind with a glaze on top. I couldn’t remember my grandma making anything like that (even though it sounded incredibly Italian!) so I did some searching around and found tons of amazing-looking recipes to try. This was definitely the best of the bunch.

These cookies are so light and refreshing compared to some other heavier favorites like chocolate chip or oatmeal raisin. They’re a soft, buttery cookie, much like a puffy sugar cookie. The difference? They are thoroughly infused with fresh orange zest and juice to amp up their flavor. In addition, a sweet orange glaze using more zest and juice is slathered on top.

Rubbing orange zest into sugar.

Get Maximum Orange Flavor!

Back when I started doing a lot of baking on my own, one of the first books that I really dug into was Dorie Greenspan’s Bake: From My Home to Yours. In one of the orange or lemon-flavored recipes in the book, she shared a technique for ensuring that the citrus flavor was really infused throughout the recipe, and I have used that same technique every single time I make a recipe using orange zest, lemon zest, or lime zest.

The secret?

Using your fingers, rub the zest into the sugar that’s called for in the recipe. It takes a few minutes, but eventually, all of the zest (including its oils!) will be absorbed by the sugar and it will have the consistency of wet sand. Now, when the butter and sugar get creamed together, all of that wonderful orange essence will be infused throughout the entire batter. It makes for a flavor that is far more potent and cookies that are more aromatic than compared to just mixing the zest in with the other ingredients.

Make-Ahead Notes

If you’d like to prepare these cookies in advance or get a head start on holiday baking (these would be perfect for Easter or Christmas!), here are some tips:

  • Refrigerate Dough: You can refrigerate the dough, covered, for up to 2 days before scooping and baking. Allow it to sit at room temperature for approximately 20 minutes to make scooping easier.
  • Freeze Dough: Scoop the cookies and place on the baking sheets, then place in the freezer until the balls of dough are completely frozen. Transfer to a freezer-safe zip-top bag and keep in the freezer for up to 3 months. Bake from frozen, adding a couple of minutes to the bake time.
  • Freeze Baked Cookies: Fully baked, cooled, and iced cookies (be sure the icing has had a chance to fully set) can be frozen by placing the cookies on a baking sheet, placing the sheet in the freezer until the cookies are completely frozen. Transfer the cookies to an airtight container, separating layers with parchment or wax paper, and freeze for up to 3 months.

A cookie sheet with balls of orange cookie dough.

I absolutely love the burst of flavor that these cookies have; they’ll definitely brighten up your day!

Whether you’re searching for something a little bit different for your Easter or Christmas baking, maybe you want something a little unique for a wedding cookie table, or just LOVE citrus, these orange cookies will wow you time and again.

An overhead photo of orange cookies on a plate with a cut of milk.

More Orange-Infused Recipes:

Orange Cookies with Sweet Orange Glaze

These soft, buttery orange cookies are flavored with orange zest and orange juice, and iced with a sweet orange glaze. Their old-fashioned flavor will remind you of your grandma's kitchen!

For the Cookies:

  • 2½ cups all purpose flour
  • 1 teaspoon baking powder
  • ¼ teaspoon salt
  • 1 cup granulated sugar
  • 2 tablespoons orange zest
  • 1 cup unsalted butter
  • 2 tablespoons fresh orange juice
  • 1 egg

For the Sweet Orange Glaze:

  • 1½ cups powdered sugar
  • 1 tablespoon orange zest
  • Fresh orange juice
  1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees F. Line two baking pans with parchment paper or silicone baking mats; set aside.

  2. Make the Cookies: In a medium bowl, whisk together the flour, baking powder, and salt; set aside.

  3. In a small bowl, combine the the sugar and orange zest, rubbing them together with your fingers until the zest is completely incorporated into the sugar.
  4. Using an electric mixer on medium speed, cream together the butter and the orange zest-infused sugar until light and fluffy, about 3 minutes. Add the egg and orange and mix until combined, scraping the sides of the bowl as needed. Reduce the mixer speed to low and gradually add the dry ingredients, mixing until just combined. If the dough seems a little on the soft side, refrigerate it for up to 30 minutes.

  5. Using a medium cookie scoop (or 2 tablespoonfuls), scoop out the dough and roll them into balls, placing them 2 inches apart on the prepared cookie sheets. Bake for 10 to 12 minutes, or until very lightly browned around the edges, but still pale in the middle. Let cool for 5 to 10 minutes on the cookie sheet, and then remove to a cooling rack to cool completely.

  6. Make the Sweet Orange Glaze: Whisk together the powdered sugar, orange zest, and enough orange juice to achieve the desired consistency (less juice for a thicker glaze, more for a thinner one). Spread glaze over top of the cooled cookies, and allow to set at room temperature for at least 30 minutes. Store at room temperature in an airtight container (divide layers with wax paper so the cookies don't stick together).

  • You can substitute the orange zest and juice with lemon, lime, or even grapefruit for different flavored cookies.
  • If you’re like me and love the orange and chocolate flavor combination, feel free to add some chocolate chips to the cookie dough. I would recommend 1 cup of mini chocolate chips.
  • Make-Ahead (Refrigerate Dough): You can refrigerate the dough, covered, for up to 2 days before scooping and baking. Allow it to sit at room temperature for approximately 20 minutes to make scooping easier.
  • Make-Ahead (Freeze Dough): Scoop the cookies and place on the baking sheets, then place in the freezer until the balls of dough are completely frozen. Transfer to a freezer-safe zip-top bag and keep in the freezer for up to 3 months. Bake from frozen, adding a couple of minutes to the bake time.
  • Make-Ahead (Freeze Baked Cookies): Fully baked, cooled, and iced cookies (be sure the icing has had a chance to fully set) can be frozen by placing the cookies on a baking sheet, placing the sheet in the freezer until the cookies are completely frozen. Transfer the cookies to an airtight container, separating layers with parchment or wax paper, and freeze for up to 3 months.

 

(Recipe adapted from Stephanie’s Kitchen)

Originally published in 2012, this orange cookie recipe has been updated to include new photos and more in-depth recipe tips.

[photos by Dee of One Sarcastic Baker]

The post Orange Cookies with Sweet Orange Glaze appeared first on Brown Eyed Baker.

Cranberry Pumpkin Steel Cut Oats

When fall sets in, there’s nothing quite as comforting as warming up with a bowl of oats.
This recipe brings autumnal flavors of cranberry and pumpkin into an incredibly delicious and wholesome breakfast! It will make you wish it was fall every d…

Cranberry Pumpkin Steel Cut Oats

When fall sets in, there’s nothing quite as comforting as warming up with a bowl of oats.

This recipe brings autumnal flavors of cranberry and pumpkin into an incredibly delicious and wholesome breakfast! It will make you wish it was fall every day of the year. But who are we kidding- it doesn’t have to be fall to enjoy a bowl of creamy Cranberry Pumpkin Steel Cut Oats, does it?

Cranberry Pumpkin Steel Cut Oats from Minimalist Baker →

Multigrain and Seed Biscotti

I was browsing some older cookbooks recently. There are so many really great new cookbooks that come out every season that it’s easy to forget some of the beloved ones waiting patiently on our shelves, for us to return to them. Before electronics came on the scene, I used to curl up every night under the cover with an actual book or two, before dozing…

I was browsing some older cookbooks recently. There are so many really great new cookbooks that come out every season that it’s easy to forget some of the beloved ones waiting patiently on our shelves, for us to return to them. Before electronics came on the scene, I used to curl up every night under the cover with an actual book or two, before dozing off to bed.

The downside was that I always ended up bookmarking recipes that I wanted to make, and I’d get excited, and start running up and down (in back and forth) in my mind, about how I’m going to gather the ingredients when I wake up the next morning. Recently one that I came across was a recipe for Multigrain Biscotti in a cookbook from the ’90s that had nearly two dozen ingredients in it. But they sounded so good, I made a little (okay…not-so-little) shopping list, for the next day, using that list as a bookmark, planning to make them the next day.

Continue Reading Multigrain and Seed Biscotti...

Homemade Fruit Popsicles – Strawberry, Orange, & Mango

These homemade fruit popsicles are the ultimate summer treat. The layers of mango, orange, and strawberry taste as amazing as they look, and they couldn’t be easier to make. Who’s ready for a frozen treat?  At my house, summer time mea…

These homemade fruit popsicles are the ultimate summer treat. The layers of mango, orange, and strawberry taste as amazing as they look, and they couldn’t be easier to make. Who’s ready for a frozen treat?  At my house, summer time means pool time. And we’re in Florida, so it sure gets hot out there. My...

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