How to Cook Fiddleheads, the Vegetable That Tastes of Spring

Every week we get Down & Dirty, in which we break down our favorite unique seasonal fruits, vegetables, and more.Today: we’re talking about fiddlehead ferns—learn what to look for, how to prep them, and get ideas for safely enjoying them in m…

Every week we get Down & Dirty, in which we break down our favorite unique seasonal fruits, vegetables, and more.Today: we're talking about fiddlehead ferns—learn what to look for, how to prep them, and get ideas for safely enjoying them in meals all week long.

Did your mom ever tell you to eat your vegetables so you’d grow big and strong? Bet she never promised invisibility. In Europe’s Middle Ages, people believed that carrying “fern seed” would make you disappear from sight. Shakespeare even referenced these magical powers in Henry IV! While we can't vouch for super powers, we can affirm that ferns are to thank for a fleeting spring treat. 

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Tatsoi Is the New Spinach (Haven’t You Heard?)

Every week we get Down & Dirty, in which we break down our favorite unique seasonal fruits, vegetables, and more.
Today is all about our new favorite green. Learn what to look for at the market, and how to work it into meals from now till next week…

Every week we get Down & Dirty, in which we break down our favorite unique seasonal fruits, vegetables, and more.

Today is all about our new favorite green. Learn what to look for at the market, and how to work it into meals from now till next week. 

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17 Flavor-Packed Ways to Use Turmeric—Fresh or Ground

If you have a jar of ground turmeric in your spice rack, it’s probably for one of two reasons. One: You cook a lot of cuisines that call for it in their dishes (like Indian, Thai, or Persian, perhaps) and your jar of ground turmeric gets almost a…

If you have a jar of ground turmeric in your spice rack, it’s probably for one of two reasons. One: You cook a lot of cuisines that call for it in their dishes (like Indian, Thai, or Persian, perhaps) and your jar of ground turmeric gets almost as much use as salt. Or, two: You picked up a jar of it ages ago for a recipe that called for a small amount—probably more for color than flavor—and your ground turmeric sees less action than juniper berries

Don’t get me wrong, I like its color-boosting powers, especially in scrambled tofu. It has a lot of value as an all-natural coloring agent: It’s used to color everything from mustard to chicken soup. (You can also use ground turmeric to dye Easter eggs.) 

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