Garibaldi Cocktail (Campari & Orange!)

The Garibaldi cocktail is an Italian drink with only 2 ingredients: Campari and orange juice! It’s a surprisingly balanced combination. Here’s a unique drink to whip up at home: the Garibaldi cocktail! This Italian cocktail has so much going for it, it’s hard to know where to start. It’s got only two ingredients, which makes it supremely easy to mix up. There’s a little textural little flair with a foamy topping. And the flavor? It comes out balanced and refreshing, with bitter, sweet and tangy notes all intermingling in the perfect sip. From the first drink, I was both surprised, delighted, and ready to make another one. Here’s what to know about this seriously simple drink! What’s a Garibaldi cocktail? The Garibaldi is a two-ingredient Italian cocktail made with Campari and orange juice. The drink is named after Giuseppe Garibaldi, a general who contributed to the unification of Italy back in 1871. The idea is that Campari comes from the North of Italy and oranges come from the South…hence the unification of the North and South occur right in your glass! The drink is an aperativo or aperatif, meant to be drunk before dinner. You’ll find the Garibaldi on cocktail […]

A Couple Cooks – Healthy, Whole Food, & Vegetarian Recipes

The Garibaldi cocktail is an Italian drink with only 2 ingredients: Campari and orange juice! It’s a surprisingly balanced combination.

Garibaldi Cocktail

Here’s a unique drink to whip up at home: the Garibaldi cocktail! This Italian cocktail has so much going for it, it’s hard to know where to start. It’s got only two ingredients, which makes it supremely easy to mix up. There’s a little textural little flair with a foamy topping. And the flavor? It comes out balanced and refreshing, with bitter, sweet and tangy notes all intermingling in the perfect sip. From the first drink, I was both surprised, delighted, and ready to make another one. Here’s what to know about this seriously simple drink!

What’s a Garibaldi cocktail?

The Garibaldi is a two-ingredient Italian cocktail made with Campari and orange juice. The drink is named after Giuseppe Garibaldi, a general who contributed to the unification of Italy back in 1871. The idea is that Campari comes from the North of Italy and oranges come from the South…hence the unification of the North and South occur right in your glass! The drink is an aperativo or aperatif, meant to be drunk before dinner.

You’ll find the Garibaldi on cocktail menus in Italy, and it’s also a famous drink served at the Dante cocktail bar in NYC. The only ingredients you’ll need for a Garibaldi cocktail are:

  • Campari
  • Fresh squeezed orange juice (see more below)
Garibaldi cocktail

The orange juice to use

The important part about the orange juice in a Garibaldi: do not even think about using a bottle of purchased OJ here. The magic is in the fresh squeezed orange juice. You can use any type of orange; here are our favorite options:

  • Valencia oranges are most classic for the drink.
  • Blood oranges are another great choice. This is what we used here: blood oranges have a beautiful red color which goes well with the bright red Campari. The dark red of the blood orange slice also looks dramatic as a garnish.

How to make the Garibaldi: blend the juice to make a frothy top!

Here’s the cool thing about the orange juice in a Garibaldi cocktail: it’s blended so that the top forms a frothy foam. It’s almost like a natural version of the classic egg white foam that tops a whiskey sour. The froth was traditionally from the juicer, but you can also use a blender or a few other tools to achieve the same effect. Here are a few tools you can use:

  • Blender: Throw your orange juice in the blender and blend until foamy.
  • Hand frother: We have a hand frother to froth milk for lattes, and it works like a charm here!
  • Whisk: You can also just use a handheld whisk. Whisk it vigorously until you see some froth.

From there, all you have to do is combine the two ingredients in a highball glass and fill it with ice. It’s that easy: no cocktail shaker needed!

Campari

More about Campari

If it’s not already in your liquor cabinet, you should grab a bottle of Campari! It’s a well known spirit that can make all sorts of drinks. Here’s what to know:

  • Campari is an Italian bitter with a bright red color. It’s easy to find, most famously used in the Negroni and other classic cocktails like the Americano and Boulevardier.
  • What does Campari taste like? It’s tastes bitter, fruity, and spicy all at once. It’s infused with different herbs and fruits, part of a secret recipe.
  • Fun fact: Campari was originally colored so brightly red due to a dye made of crushed insects! That’s no longer in the modern recipe, so it shouldn’t deter you from grabbing a bottle.

Step it up: try clear ice!

Want to take your Garibaldi cocktail to the next level? Make with clear ice. It’s an artisan style of ice that’s crystal clear and looks like the type you’d get at a fancy bar. You can cut large chunks and they take this drink to superstar level. All you need is 24 hours and a small cooler! Go to How to Make Clear Ice.

Garibaldi cocktail

More Campari cocktails

What else to make with a bottle of Campari? This Italian liqueur stars in lots of famous and unique cocktails. Here are a few more to try:

  • Classic Negroni The Negroni is the most famous Campari cocktail: equal parts gin, Campari and dry vermouth. It’s ultra dry and bitter, so we prefer some of the spin-offs on this famous drink.
  • Negroni Sbagliato is a Negroni made with Prosecco, or the Boulevardier Cocktail is a Negroni made with bourbon. Both are even better than the original!
  • Campari Spritz Bitter and bubbly, this refreshing mixed drink is perfect for sipping! Make this easy cocktail with 3 ingredients in 3 minutes.
  • Jungle Bird Truly special! A tropical rum cocktail with a twist: bitter Campari offsets sweet pineapple juice.

When to serve a Garibaldi cocktail

The Garibaldi cocktail is a festive and fun drink that’s very easy to whip up. The brilliant red-orange color makes it great for parties, or it’s perfect for a laid back evening! (With the blood orange juice, it’s also a fun Halloween cocktail idea.) It’s great as a:

  • Italian cocktail for a dinner party
  • Signature drink
  • Cocktail hour drink
  • Party drink
  • Happy hour drink
  • Dinner party drink
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Garibaldi Cocktail

Garibaldi Cocktail (Campari & Orange!)


1 Star2 Stars3 Stars4 Stars5 Stars (6 votes, average: 5.00 out of 5)

  • Author: Sonja Overhiser
  • Prep Time: 5 minutes
  • Cook Time: 0 minutes
  • Total Time: 5 minutes
  • Yield: 1 drink
  • Diet: Vegan

Description

The Garibaldi cocktail is an Italian drink with only 2 ingredients: Campari and orange juice! It’s a surprisingly balanced combination.


Ingredients

  • 1 1/2 ounces (3 tablespoons) Campari
  • 4 ounces (1/2 cup) fresh squeezed orange juice (or blood orange juice)
  • Garnish: orange wedge (optional)

Instructions

  1. Squeeze the orange juice. Use an immersion blender, hand frother or whisk to blend the orange juice until it is foamy.
  2. Add Campari to a highball filled with ice. Top with foamed orange juice and stir gently. Top with an orange wedge. 

  • Category: Drink
  • Method: Stirred
  • Cuisine: Cocktails

Keywords: Garibaldi cocktail, Garibaldi

A Couple Cooks - Healthy, Whole Food, & Vegetarian Recipes

Jungle Bird

The Jungle Bird is a tropical rum cocktail with a twist! Bitter Campari offsets sweet pineapple juice to make a balanced, refreshing mixed drink. Love fruity drinks but want something more complex? Here’s the drink for you: the Jungle Bird! It’s one of the few rum cocktails to pair tropical flavors with an Italian bitter: Campari. You might know Campari from the ubiquitous Negroni: an ultra dry and bitter drink. But add it to a tropical drink and the effect is surprising. Campari perfectly balances the drink and gives the finish an intriguing complexity. In fact, it’s become a favorite around here…and that’s saying something, given our extensive library of cocktails. It hits all the right notes: sweet, tart, fruity, and bitter. What’s a Jungle Bird cocktail? The Jungle Bird is a tropical cocktail made with rum, pineapple juice, and Campari. The story goes that it was invented in 1978 at the Aviary bar of the Kuala Lumpur Hilton. The telltale sign it’s that it’s modern: it fuses the Italian bitter Campari with the tropical flavors. This drink recently surged in popularity, fueled by the Negroni craze. The drink is often garnished with pineapple leaves to mimic the feathers of […]

A Couple Cooks – Healthy, Whole Food, & Vegetarian Recipes

The Jungle Bird is a tropical rum cocktail with a twist! Bitter Campari offsets sweet pineapple juice to make a balanced, refreshing mixed drink.

Jungle bird

Love fruity drinks but want something more complex? Here’s the drink for you: the Jungle Bird! It’s one of the few rum cocktails to pair tropical flavors with an Italian bitter: Campari. You might know Campari from the ubiquitous Negroni: an ultra dry and bitter drink. But add it to a tropical drink and the effect is surprising. Campari perfectly balances the drink and gives the finish an intriguing complexity. In fact, it’s become a favorite around here…and that’s saying something, given our extensive library of cocktails. It hits all the right notes: sweet, tart, fruity, and bitter.

What’s a Jungle Bird cocktail?

The Jungle Bird is a tropical cocktail made with rum, pineapple juice, and Campari. The story goes that it was invented in 1978 at the Aviary bar of the Kuala Lumpur Hilton. The telltale sign it’s that it’s modern: it fuses the Italian bitter Campari with the tropical flavors. This drink recently surged in popularity, fueled by the Negroni craze. The drink is often garnished with pineapple leaves to mimic the feathers of a bird. The ingredients in a Jungle Bird cocktail are:

  • Dark rum
  • Pineapple juice
  • Campari
  • Lime juice
  • Simple syrup
Jungle bird cocktail

Dark rum vs light rum: what’s the difference?

The Jungle Bird uses dark rum: something altogether different than the light rum you’ve got for daiquiris and piña coladas. Here’s a breakdown of the differences:

  • Dark rum is aged longer than white rum. It has a dark color and a developed flavor with caramel notes.
  • Light rum or white rum is clear and has a smoother, sweeter flavor than dark rum.

Can you use light rum in a Jungle Bird? Sure. It won’t taste quite the same, but it’s similar. Of course if you’re a purist: go grab a bottle of dark rum!

All about Campari

Campari is an Italian bitter with a bright red color! It’s easy to find, most famously used in the Negroni and other classic cocktails like the Americano and Boulevardier.

What does Campari taste like? It’s tastes bitter, fruity, and spicy all at once. It’s infused with different herbs and fruits, part of a secret recipe. Fun fact: Campari was originally colored so brightly red due to a dye made of crushed insects! That’s no longer in the modern recipe, so it shouldn’t deter you from grabbing a bottle.

Campari

How to make a Jungle Bird

It’s quick and easy to make a Jungle Bird once you’ve got all the ingredients on hand! It’s a typical shaken cocktail that you’ll shake in a

  • Shake in a cocktail shaker. Place all ingredients in a cocktail shaker, add ice, and shake (Don’t have one? Use a mason jar!)
  • Strain into a glass and garnish. Strain the drink into a lowball glass. Garnish with a pineapple wedge. If you happen to have the pineapple leaves on hand, they make a great garnish evocative of bird feathers.

More Campari cocktails

Love Campari? There are so many interesting drinks with this Italian liqueur to try outside of the Negroni. Here are some great Campari cocktails to test out:

  • Negroni Sbagliato A spin on the classic cocktail using sparkling wine instead of gin. It’s bitter, sweet, and bubbly all at once.
  • Old Pal Cocktail A three ingredient cocktail that’s sleek and sippable, balancing bitter and sweet with fiery whiskey.
  • Mezcal Negroni The way the smoke of mezcal balances the bitter Campari makes an even better drink.
  • Campari Spritz Bitter and bubbly, this cocktail mixes the popular aperativo with sparkling wine and soda water.
Jungle bird

When to serve a Jungle Bird

The Jungle Bird is a festive and fun cocktail, great for parties or a laid back evening! It’s great as a:

  • Summer drink
  • Signature drink
  • Cocktail hour drink
  • Party drink
  • Happy hour drink
  • Dinner party drink
Print
Jungle bird

Jungle Bird Cocktail (with Campari!)


1 Star2 Stars3 Stars4 Stars5 Stars (No Ratings Yet)

  • Author: Sonja Overhiser
  • Prep Time: 5 minutes
  • Cook Time: 0 minutes
  • Total Time: 5 minutes
  • Yield: 1 drink
  • Diet: Vegan

Description

The Jungle Bird is a tropical rum cocktail with a twist! Bitter Campari offsets sweet pineapple juice to make a balanced, refreshing mixed drink.


Ingredients

  • 1 1/2 ounces (3 tablespoons) dark rum
  • 1 1/2 ounces (3 tablespoons) pineapple juice
  • 3/4 to 1 ounce (2 tablespoons) Campari (to taste)
  • 1/2 ounce (1 tablespoon) lime juice
  • 1/2 ounce (1 tablespoon) simple syrup or maple syrup
  • For the garnish: Pineapple wedge, pineapple leaves (optional)

Instructions

  1. Add the dark rum, pineapple juice, Campari, lime juice, and simple syrup to a cocktail shaker and fill it with ice. Shake vigorously until cold.
  2. Strain into cocktail glass. Garnish with a pineapple wedge, pineapple leaves, or fresh mint.

  • Category: Drink
  • Method: Cocktails
  • Cuisine: American

Keywords: Jungle Bird, Rum cocktail

More rum drinks

Love mixed drinks with rum? Here are a few more to add to your repertoire:

A Couple Cooks - Healthy, Whole Food, & Vegetarian Recipes

Negroni Sbagliato Spritz

[NOTE: Learn more about making this apéritif with Brad Thomas Parsons, award-winning author of Bitters, Amaro, and Last Call, on my IG Live Apéro Hour today at 6pm CET (Noon ET, 9am PT) Tune in and join us!] I don’t know about you, but I can’t think of a better way to relax in the warm weather, than with a refreshing Spritz. I was introduced…

Negroni Sbagliato spritz cocktail

[NOTE: Learn more about making this apéritif with Brad Thomas Parsons, award-winning author of Bitters, Amaro, and Last Call, on my IG Live Apéro Hour today at 6pm CET (Noon ET, 9am PT) Tune in and join us!]

I don’t know about you, but I can’t think of a better way to relax in the warm weather, than with a refreshing Spritz. I was introduced to the Spritz when I went to coffee school in 2007, in Trieste, Italy. I drank at least six cups of espresso every day – how could I not? – surprising even the Italian teachers. And by the end of the day, I needed to wind down.

Negroni Sbagliato spritz cocktail

So after class, I’d go to a local caffè in the early evening where I noticed everyone drinking colorful drinks in large, wide goblets filled with handfuls of ice. Since icy beverages are often hard to come by in some countries in Europe, it was surprising to see people drinking cold drinks loaded up with ice. And I wanted one.

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Lucien Gaudin Cocktail

Note: I’ll be making this cocktail today at 6pm CET (Noon ET, 9am PT) on my IG Live Apéro Hour on Instagram. To watch, head to my profile on my IG profile page at that time, and when the circle around my profile pic says “Live” – click on it to tune in. More info, as well as how to watch it in replay in…

Note: I’ll be making this cocktail today at 6pm CET (Noon ET, 9am PT) on my IG Live Apéro Hour on Instagram. To watch, head to my profile on my IG profile page at that time, and when the circle around my profile pic says “Live” – click on it to tune in. More info, as well as how to watch it in replay in my IGTV channel archives, is here.

The clever cocktail, seemingly another riff on the Negroni (like The Tunnel), is named after French fencing champion Lucien Gaudin, who won gold and silver medals in the Olympics during the 1920s. Other than that, I’ve never found any other information about it; who came up with it or why the cocktail is associated with a French fencer.

Continue Reading Lucien Gaudin Cocktail...

The Tunnel Cocktail (from Cravan, Paris)

Note: Join me and Franck as he mixes up this Tunnel cocktail today on my IG Apéro Hour, live from…Cravan! Join us at 6pm CET, Noon ET, and 9am PT. Go to my Instagram profile at that time and click on my profile picture when there is a red circle around it, which means we are live. You can also watch us in replay on…

Note: Join me and Franck as he mixes up this Tunnel cocktail today on my IG Apéro Hour, live from…Cravan! Join us at 6pm CET, Noon ET, and 9am PT. Go to my Instagram profile at that time and click on my profile picture when there is a red circle around it, which means we are live. You can also watch us in replay on my IGTV channel. More information about how to tune in, and watch live, as well as in replay, here.

One of my favorite spots in Paris is Cravan. It’s not right in the middle of town, nor is it in the popular St. Germain area, or the trendy 10th or 11th arrondissements. But a few métro stops is all it takes to find yourself at one of the loveliest little outposts in the city.

Continue Reading The Tunnel Cocktail (from Cravan, Paris)...

Drinking French Bar Box

I was delighted that so many people were interested in setting up a French bar in advance of the publication of Drinking French and have been asked what liquors and spirits to get. So I’ve teamed up with Slope Cellars wine and spirits shop in New York City to release a Drinking French Bar Box. The Drinking French Bar Box includes a bottle of Old…

I was delighted that so many people were interested in setting up a French bar in advance of the publication of Drinking French and have been asked what liquors and spirits to get. So I’ve teamed up with Slope Cellars wine and spirits shop in New York City to release a Drinking French Bar Box.

The Drinking French Bar Box includes a bottle of Old Forester Bottled in Bond Rye, Forthave Red Apéritif Bitters (Aperitivo), Citadelle gin, and a demi-bottle of Dolin sweet vermouth, as well as a copy of Drinking French. With those bottles, you’ll be able to make several drinks in the book, including my favorite cocktail, the Boulevardier and the Americano, a low ABV apéritif that’s perfect for easy-going spring and summer sipping. You may want to augment your Bar Box with any of the spirits listed here to increase the number of drinks you can make. (Some specific suggestions would be Salers, Dolin dry vermouth, Byrrh Grand Quinquina, calvados, Lillet, and/or Chartreuse. The shop also carries a very good selection of French wines.)

The Old Forester bottled in bond rye is a revival of a historic recipe and is higher proof than standard rye whiskey, so it shines more brightly when mixed in a cocktail. Citadelle gin was the first gin produced in France and is family-owned, flavored with juniper collected from gardens around the family home. Forthave Spirits is a micro-distillery in New York City that produces an especially excellent apertivo (red bitter apéritif, similar to Campari) with a strong botanical profile. It’s great in a cocktail, or on its own with a splash of sparkling water and a twist. Dolin French vermouth is another family-owned distillery, operating since the 1820s in the French alps, and made with local herbs, flowers, and roots.

Continue Reading Drinking French Bar Box...

What to Buy When Starting a French Bar at Home

Weeks before Drinking French came out, people were asking me what liquors and spirits to buy in anticipation of the book’s release. Skimming through the 160 recipes in the book, many of which are for cocktails and apéritifs, I offered up tips here and there, suggesting a few essential bottles that could be used for a number of recipes in the book. I also added…

Weeks before Drinking French came out, people were asking me what liquors and spirits to buy in anticipation of the book’s release. Skimming through the 160 recipes in the book, many of which are for cocktails and apéritifs, I offered up tips here and there, suggesting a few essential bottles that could be used for a number of recipes in the book. I also added a few extras (at the end of this post) to those suggestions, that aren’t vital to have, but are some of my favorites in case they wanted to branch out a little into some other French drinks, and spirits.

Continue Reading What to Buy When Starting a French Bar at Home...

Treat Yourself Today With Melissa Clark’s Instagram-Famous Campari Cake

If you’ve been a home cook, even a dabbling one, in the last 15 or so years, you know Melissa Clark. Maybe you’ve come across her regular writing and recipes in The New York Times, or cooked from one of her more than 40 (!) cookbooks, which range in su…

If you’ve been a home cook, even a dabbling one, in the last 15 or so years, you know Melissa Clark. Maybe you've come across her regular writing and recipes in The New York Times, or cooked from one of her more than 40 (!) cookbooks, which range in subject from braising and weeknight cooking to the Instant Pot and bread machines.

Her latest, recently released on Mar. 10, is Dinner in French. It's a book that seems to hit, bullseye-style, Clark’s expertise: balancing the ease of weeknight recipes with somewhat more ambitious techniques and ingredients. It's the perfect home-cook's book.

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