Rosemary Roasted Root Vegetable Panzanella

If you’ve never tried panzanella, you’re in for a treat!
Greens are tossed with a medley of fall vegetables, jumbo sourdough croutons (yes, we said jumbo), and tangy-sweet, grainy mustard dressing. Just 30 minutes required for this deceptively wholeso…

Rosemary Roasted Root Vegetable Panzanella

If you’ve never tried panzanella, you’re in for a treat!

Greens are tossed with a medley of fall vegetables, jumbo sourdough croutons (yes, we said jumbo), and tangy-sweet, grainy mustard dressing. Just 30 minutes required for this deceptively wholesome comfort meal.

Origins of Panzanella

Panzanella is a bread salad that’s believed to have originated in Tuscany, Italy. And it may have been invented by peasants as a way to use up stale bread.

Rosemary Roasted Root Vegetable Panzanella from Minimalist Baker →

Radicchio Salad with Cashew Ricotta Dressing

A dear friend of ours makes a radicchio salad that made quite the impression on me years ago, so I recently asked him for the recipe, and he obliged. The good news is, it was even easier than I thought it would be.
Vibrant, fresh radicchio is topped wi…

Radicchio Salad with Cashew Ricotta Dressing

A dear friend of ours makes a radicchio salad that made quite the impression on me years ago, so I recently asked him for the recipe, and he obliged. The good news is, it was even easier than I thought it would be.

Vibrant, fresh radicchio is topped with a creamy cashew ricotta dressing that adds a beautiful lemony, garlicky flavor to the salad. And then come roasted beets, crispy roasted garlic, and candied walnuts.

Radicchio Salad with Cashew Ricotta Dressing from Minimalist Baker →

Simple Roasted Beet Relish

This simple, citrusy relish is inspired by the Vegan Bowl at Teote — a Latin restaurant we love in Portland, Oregon. In fact, I already shared my take on the bowl itself here. But there was something missing: The mysteriously delicious and addictive be…

Simple Roasted Beet Relish

This simple, citrusy relish is inspired by the Vegan Bowl at Teote — a Latin restaurant we love in Portland, Oregon. In fact, I already shared my take on the bowl itself here. But there was something missing: The mysteriously delicious and addictive beet relish.

I don’t know how exactly they make it at Teote, but my taste buds tell me I did a pretty good job at deconstructing it here for you all.

Simple Roasted Beet Relish from Minimalist Baker →

Egg Salad Sandwiches with Roasted Beet

Say hello to your new favorite sandwich: creamy egg salad seasoned with paprika, thin slices of roasted beet, and a generous handful of spicy microgreens to perfectly offset the richness of the egg. Taylor’s classic egg salad is simple and satisfying, with only 4 ingredients (eggs included), plus salt and pepper. It’s not overly mayo-heavy […]

Say hello to your new favorite sandwich: creamy egg salad seasoned with paprika, thin slices of roasted beet, and a generous handful of spicy microgreens to perfectly offset the richness of the egg.

Taylor’s classic egg salad is simple and satisfying, with only 4 ingredients (eggs included), plus salt and pepper. It’s not overly mayo-heavy or mustard-forward, with a very simple flavor profile that let you actually taste the egg (not overwhelmed by dill or relish or other add-ins). A pinch of sweet paprika gives the egg salad a well-rounded flavor and ever so slightly pink hue (something that pairs perfectly with the rich ruby red of the beets).

Egg salad sandwich cut in half, showing the layers of beet and egg

Lunch is often a struggle around these parts.

We try to plan our dinners to include leftovers (let’s just say we’re masters at cooking for 4 for this reason), but sometimes we find ourselves floundering in the kitchen at noon, hangry and without a solid plan for lunch.

It’s days like these that egg salad sandwiches have become our go-to. Don’t ask me where the idea for the beet came from, I just know I came downstairs one day to find Taylor had thrown this together and I fell in love all over again. Something about the sweet, earthiness of the beet goes so well with the creamy egg salad.

Assuming we have some roasted beets in the fridge (I fully admit we’ve been buying packaged pre-roasted beets and I’m not ashamed about it), these sandwiches come together in about 20 minutes, including the time it takes to boil, cool, and peel the eggs. Hard-boil a few eggs ahead of time and it’d be even quicker.

Egg salad sandwich with roasted beets and microgreens

While this small-batch egg salad recipe could be used in a variety of ways, our favorite assemblage includes thin slices of roasted red beet, a thick layer of creamy egg salad, and a pile of spicy microgreens (arugula or watercress would also be great here too!)

The creaminess of the egg, the earthiness of the beet, and the spiciness of the greens all come together on slices of thick brioche sandwich bread to make what I consider the perfect sandwich.

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Vibrant Collard Green Wraps with Green Curry Tahini Sauce

This vibrant, colorful collard green wrap comes together in just 20 minutes and makes the perfect portable snack or meal. It’s great for making ahead for meal prep and keeps in the fridge for several days.
The star of the show is the tangy-cream…

Vibrant Collard Green Wraps with Green Curry Tahini Sauce

This vibrant, colorful collard green wrap comes together in just 20 minutes and makes the perfect portable snack or meal. It’s great for making ahead for meal prep and keeps in the fridge for several days.

The star of the show is the tangy-creamy green curry tahini sauce made with our go-to Green Curry Paste. This wrap is what plant-based dreams are made of!

It’s no secret that around here we’re big fans of cuisines and flavors from around the world (including the Middle East, Germany, and Thailand).

Vibrant Collard Green Wraps with Green Curry Tahini Sauce from Minimalist Baker →

Easy Beet Falafel

After an intense craving for beet falafel, I felt drawn to the kitchen to play around with a way to infuse this incredibly nourishing vegetable into falafel.
The result was a vibrant-colored, magenta falafel that was garlicky, zesty, crispy, and incre…

Easy Beet Falafel

After an intense craving for beet falafel, I felt drawn to the kitchen to play around with a way to infuse this incredibly nourishing vegetable into falafel.

The result was a vibrant-colored, magenta falafel that was garlicky, zesty, crispy, and incredibly delicious. Plus, just 8 ingredients and simple methods required!

Origins of Falafel

The origin of falafel is an ongoing and heated debate. Some would say it’s a quintessential Israeli food, while Palestinians claim its Arab roots, and still others claim it originated in Egypt, Lebanon, or Yemen. 

While we claim no expertise on the origins of falafel, we do know we absolutely love its crispy texture and rich flavor.

Easy Beet Falafel from Minimalist Baker →

Red Velvet Cake Smoothie

Sometimes you just need something indulgent and you need it fast: Enter, this red velvet smoothie. It captures the flavors and colors of red velvet cake but with wholesome ingredients like banana, beets, cocoa powder, and dates. Swoon!
Just 5 minutes, …

Red Velvet Cake Smoothie

Sometimes you just need something indulgent and you need it fast: Enter, this red velvet smoothie. It captures the flavors and colors of red velvet cake but with wholesome ingredients like banana, beets, cocoa powder, and dates. Swoon!

Just 5 minutes, 1 blender, and 6 ingredients required for this incredibly satisfying smoothie inspired by red velvet cake. Red velvet cake is a Southern dish that originated in the 1800s.

Red Velvet Cake Smoothie from Minimalist Baker →

No-Bake Red Velvet Cake Balls (V/GF)

Introducing a red velvet spin on our incredible no-bake chocolate cake balls!
These cake balls are infused with beetroot powder for a deeper chocolate flavor and health perks. Just 1 bowl, 7 ingredients, and 10 minutes required for these healthier tre…

No-Bake Red Velvet Cake Balls (V/GF)

Introducing a red velvet spin on our incredible no-bake chocolate cake balls!

These cake balls are infused with beetroot powder for a deeper chocolate flavor and health perks. Just 1 bowl, 7 ingredients, and 10 minutes required for these healthier treats!

How to Make Red Velvet Cake Balls

Red velvet cake is considered a Southern dish that was invented in the 1800s. Those looking for a deeper dive into the history can do so here and here.

No-Bake Red Velvet Cake Balls (V/GF) from Minimalist Baker →

Gaby’s Roasted Beets and Labneh

Would you look at those colors?! This roasted beet side dish is the prettiest recipe I’ve made in a long time, and the leftovers look like an…

The post Gaby’s Roasted Beets and Labneh appeared first on Cookie and Kate.

roasted beet salad recipe with herbs yogurt

Would you look at those colors?! This roasted beet side dish is the prettiest recipe I’ve made in a long time, and the leftovers look like an abstract Easter basket.

This recipe comes from a new cookbook called Eat What You Want by Gaby Dalkin. You may know Gaby from her blog, What’s Gaby Cooking. I love Gaby’s fresh, California-style cooking and boundless enthusiasm for all things food-related!

eat what you want cookbook with beets

The funny thing is that I’ve never met Gaby in person, but I feel like I know her after watching her on Instagram over the years. We share an affinity for fresh herbs and flaky sea salt, and I turn to her blog and cookbook for inspiration often. When she offered to send me a copy of her cookbook, I said yes, of course.

Her newest book features “125 recipes for real life” and I had a hard time choosing just one to share with you. I’ve been on a beet kick lately, so beets won the draw. This recipe also gave me an excuse to make Gaby’s go-to basil vinaigrette, which I’ve been meaning to try for ages.

This dish features roasted beets over thick yogurt (I used Siggi’s “skyr” instead of labneh), with fresh basil vinaigrette, avocado wedges, and a heavy sprinkling of fresh herbs. Even my husband, who’s not a fan of beets, went back for more.

Continue to the recipe...

Whipped Almond Dip with Pickled Beets & Sourdough

Believe it or not, this creamy whipped almond dip is entirely vegan, and made with ingredients you already have in your pantry! A perfect starter or light lunch, we served this whipped almond dip with pickled beets and slices of fresh sourdough bread (but feel free to treat it like you would hummus, paired with […]

Believe it or not, this creamy whipped almond dip is entirely vegan, and made with ingredients you already have in your pantry!

A perfect starter or light lunch, we served this whipped almond dip with pickled beets and slices of fresh sourdough bread (but feel free to treat it like you would hummus, paired with fresh vegetables, soft pita, or even crispy chickpeas).

White bowl with whipped almond dip, topped with pickled beets and two slices of fresh sourdough.

This recipe was inspired by a dish we had in Sydney, Australia this past fall. On our last night there, we randomly found ourselves in an adorable restaurant down the street from our apartment called Dead Ringer.

One dish on the menu that immediately grabbed our attention was an appetizer of creamed almonds with beets and housemade sourdough. I’m a sucker for anything with beets, and so we ordered it not really knowing what exactly ‘creamed almonds’ would be.

Spreading whipped almond dip on a slice of fresh sourdough bread

Turns out creamed almonds are downright magical. Somehow, without any cream or dairy whatsoever, the almonds whip up into a creamy, fluffy dip with a texture falling somewhere in between hummus and whipped ricotta. With little more than a splash of lemon juice, a glug of olive oil and a garlic clove, it’s surprising just how flavorful this dip is.

In an effort to recreate the original as closely as possible, we topped ours with a drizzle of olive oil, pickled beets, fresh dill and and homemade sourdough.

The pretty pink powder is actually a mix of beet powder and sumac, which gives the dip a tart lemony twist (the beet powder is mainly for looks, so feel free to leave it out, though I’d argue the sumac is not optional since it adds so much flavor).

We realized after the fact that we forgot the black sesame seeds, which would have added another level of visual interest. Next time! (because we will certainly be making this again!)

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