Is This the Hardiest Indoor Plant Ever?

“I need a plant,” I said. To which Jarema Osofsky—aka, Dirt Queen NYC, aka, plant-problem-solver—nodded helpfully. “Well…it’s for this weird corner that’s wedged between a large crockery cupboard and a wall. It gets no light and no air—and oh, I’m know…

“I need a plant,” I said. To which Jarema Osofsky—aka, Dirt Queen NYC, aka, plant-problem-solver—nodded helpfully. “Well…it’s for this weird corner that’s wedged between a large crockery cupboard and a wall. It gets no light and no air—and oh, I’m known to forget to water my plants from time to time.”

I stopped, bracing myself for: “Get a plastic plant.” Instead, she said: “Get a snake plant.”

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Wait, Poinsettias Aren’t Just for Christmas?

Poinsettias are going to start popping up in stores soon, as these vibrant, leafy plants are a staple for the holiday season. Red and white poinsettias are especially popular around Christmas, but I’ve also pined after bright orange and pretty pink-hue…

Poinsettias are going to start popping up in stores soon, as these vibrant, leafy plants are a staple for the holiday season. Red and white poinsettias are especially popular around Christmas, but I’ve also pined after bright orange and pretty pink-hued ones, as well.

Speaking from personal experience, it’s so disappointing when you buy a gorgeous, lush poinsettia early in the holiday season, only for it to droop and wither before Christmas. These plants are actually native to Mexico, so they need fairly particular care to thrive—don’t fret, though. They’re really not hard to tend to once you know what to do.

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How to Bring Your Plants Indoors (& Keep Them Alive)

Autumn is our favorite time of year for many reasons: warm-from-the-oven pies, cozy evenings with drinking chocolate—and the yearly show put on by nature when her leafy green is overcome by an explosion of red, orange, and yellow. But not every plant o…

Autumn is our favorite time of year for many reasons: warm-from-the-oven pies, cozy evenings with drinking chocolate—and the yearly show put on by nature when her leafy green is overcome by an explosion of red, orange, and yellow. But not every plant out there is designed to go dormant during the colder months only to reemerge in the spring from frost-dusted lawns. Our outdoor potted plants—geraniums and other evergreen perennials, tender herbs like basil and parsley, and succulent gardens—need to be brought in from the cold if we’d like them to survive. 


Unfortunately, it’s not always that simple. Factors like indoor heating, icy drafts, and pesky pests can all play spoilsport. That’s why we spoke with two of the greenest thumbs around, the New York Botanical Garden’s director of glasshouse horticulture and senior curator of orchids, Marc Hachadourian, and director of brand marketing at The Sill, Erin Marino, so they could share their best tips with us.


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5 Indoor Plants You’ll Want to Bring Home, Stat

With all the extra time we’ve been spending at home this year, houseplants have had their fair share (well-deserved) of our attention. Plants like the oh-so lovely Fiddle Leaf Fig and our darling Monstera deliciosa have surged in popularity—local nurse…

With all the extra time we’ve been spending at home this year, houseplants have had their fair share (well-deserved) of our attention. Plants like the oh-so lovely Fiddle Leaf Fig and our darling Monstera deliciosa have surged in popularity—local nurseries can barely keep them in stock! (I know, because I’ve been looking for them myself.) But when any trend reaches its peak, people start looking for the next big thing, and we can’t help wondering, “What’s next?!”

So, we talked to a few of our favorite plant shops—Portland-based Pistils Nursery and Boston-located Niche Plant Shop—to find out what they—and their customers—are loving lately. A few plants in particular kept coming up, and you’re going to want to get your hands on these ASAP.

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7 Affordable, Doable Projects for an (Even) Better Backyard

Hunting down the perfect set of white outdoor pots was proving way more challenging than Amelia Ross expected. “We were walking around the garden section of our local hardware chain, and none of them were right,” she recalls. Some were too pricey, othe…

Hunting down the perfect set of white outdoor pots was proving way more challenging than Amelia Ross expected. “We were walking around the garden section of our local hardware chain, and none of them were right,” she recalls. Some were too pricey, others the right shape but wrong color, and so on. It was time to get creative.

Ross ended up picking out some exterior house paint, snapped up a few terracotta pots in varying sizes and voila. For half the cost of store-bought pots, Ross had created the perfect co-star for the fire pit she and her partner had built to make sheltering in place a little cozier.

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It’s Not Too Late to Start a Vegetable Garden—Blue Hill Shows Us How

You might have a scallion, shooting out of its bulb, sitting in your windowsill. Or a stalk of romaine, stretching up and away from its leafy base, waiting to be plucked. The coronavirus pandemic and widespread stay at home orders saw our ideas about k…

You might have a scallion, shooting out of its bulb, sitting in your windowsill. Or a stalk of romaine, stretching up and away from its leafy base, waiting to be plucked. The coronavirus pandemic and widespread stay at home orders saw our ideas about kitchens, and our practices of feeding ourselves take new shape, much of it couched in self-sufficiency. As we eke into the fifth month spent relatively homebound, the team at Blue Hill at Stone Barns is developing an even more comprehensive way to grow at home.

When COVID-19 hit, like many restaurants across the country, Blue Hill at Stone Barns was forced to let go of a majority of their employees. Located an hour north of New York City, the restaurant and the farmland upon which it sits were suddenly, uncharacteristically empty. Chef Dan Barber and Jack Algiere, the Stone Barns farm director, considered their now-jobless cooks, starting with a guiding inquiry: “What would it look like if out-of-work cooks around the world dug in and built a garden?” Thus, the The Kitchen Farming Project, was born: An online curriculum for first-time gardeners wanting to plant, harvest, and cook all their own food at home.

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The Indoor Plant We Have a Monster Crush On

The other day, while I was browsing the plant section of Home Depot, I came across a truly magnificent Monstera deliciosa, aka Swiss Cheese Plant. I’m not exaggerating when I tell you this beautiful specimen was almost as tall as me—so big that I wasn’…

The other day, while I was browsing the plant section of Home Depot, I came across a truly magnificent Monstera deliciosa, aka Swiss Cheese Plant. I’m not exaggerating when I tell you this beautiful specimen was almost as tall as me—so big that I wasn’t sure if it would even fit in the back of my car, and it only cost $90. How often do you find a 5-foot Monstera for under $100?!

I hemmed and hawed and walked several laps around the store, trying to decide whether I should take the plant home with me. I ultimately walked away—slowly and looking back often—because I was by myself and didn’t know how I’d get it into my apartment without help. Naturally, I regretted it, and returned to the store with my boyfriend in tow a few days later, but the beautiful babies were gone. Now there’s a hole in my heart where a hole-y Swiss Cheese Plant should have been.

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5 Expert Tips for Plant-ifying Your Kitchen

In their latest book Plant Tribe, Igor Josifovic-Kemper and Judith de Graaff whisk readers off to 17 attractive, plant-filled homes across the US, Europe and Brazil. What makes this book so valuable is not just their adept styling of the rooms, but how…

In their latest book Plant Tribe, Igor Josifovic-Kemper and Judith de Graaff whisk readers off to 17 attractive, plant-filled homes across the US, Europe and Brazil. What makes this book so valuable is not just their adept styling of the rooms, but how the capable hands of Igor and Judith transform the spaces into teaching tools. In one part of the book, for instance, the pair uses them to illustrate how plants have the power to affect our well-being. In another, the homes are accompanied by the authors’ insights into the business side of plants.

One particular section of note, the book’s “Room-by-Room Guide,” shows readers how they can keep plants thriving throughout their houses, including in the unusually-tricky kitchen. This spot presents a unique challenge because of its daily changes in temperature and moisture levels, sometimes shoddy natural light and its abundance of appliances (which can affect air flow and quality). Lucky for you, Igor and Judith have put together a quick guide to kitchen plant care that takes all of this into account. If you don’t have a green thumb (yet), do not fear. These tips are aimed at beginners, so follow along below, and you, too, can have a kitchen filled with happy plants.

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9 Tiny Patios That Feel Like An Oasis

Did you know there’s a whole green world of teeny-tiny, only-a-few-square-feet patios (and balconies and terraces) out there? And you don’t even need to have one to feel rejuvenated by their verdant charm. I can attest. I recently spent a whole afterno…

Did you know there’s a whole green world of teeny-tiny, only-a-few-square-feet patios (and balconies and terraces) out there? And you don’t even need to have one to feel rejuvenated by their verdant charm. I can attest. I recently spent a whole afternoon scrolling through little green spaces on Instagram. A quick search for the hashtags #pocketpatio, #tinybalcony, or #tinypatio, and my feed was suddenly green and grown-over with leaves and tiny budding flowers—here or there, a little wrought-iron chair or mini table barely visible behind trailing vines...with just enough space for a morning cup of coffee.

A wedge of outdoor space feels more important than ever these days. Each of these tiny outdoor spots is no bigger than a postage stamp—some are just big enough for one person to stand in—but, with some creativity, they offer plenty of space to grow a few herbs, flowers, tomatoes, and leafy plants on railings and floors and walls, in pots and from hooks.

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The Safest Plants to Have Around Kids & Babies

Decorating the nursery is one of the most exciting moments before a baby arrives. Unboxing the crib and painting the walls makes the upcoming wild reality, well, real. But as with anything baby-related, all decor choices—including houseplants—need to b…

Decorating the nursery is one of the most exciting moments before a baby arrives. Unboxing the crib and painting the walls makes the upcoming wild reality, well, real. But as with anything baby-related, all decor choices—including houseplants—need to be vetted (practically everything is a potential hazard).

Take my curious, rambunctious, and fearless toddler for example. There isn’t an item that he hasn’t pulled down from a table, or a small object on the floor that hasn’t gone into that mouth. (Why doesn’t he show the same enthusiasm during meals?!) So when it came to picking out the right greenery for his tiny room, I knew I’d have to research the safest options. But all the “best plants for children” lists I read online featured the same generic non-toxic houseplants. Surely there had to be something more interesting than a spider plant?

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