Pumpkin Spice Cinnamon Rolls

Pumpkin Spice Cinnamon Rolls are fluffy, sweet, and packed with everyone’s favorite pumpkin spice flavor. Make these cinnamon rolls the night before and pop them in the oven on a cozy autumn morning for a breakfast the whole family will love.  This post is sponsored by Fleischmann’s® Yeast. Thank you for continuing to support the […]

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Pumpkin Spice Cinnamon Rolls are fluffy, sweet, and packed with everyone’s favorite pumpkin spice flavor. Make these cinnamon rolls the night before and pop them in the oven on a cozy autumn morning for a breakfast the whole family will love. 

This post is sponsored by Fleischmann’s® Yeast. Thank you for continuing to support the brands that make My Baking Addiction possible.

Fall is undeniably my favorite season of the year. 

From the cozy sweaters and apple picking to enjoying warm cups of spiced apple cider while snuggled up under a blanket, fall is the best. 

And when else can we enjoy my favorite pumpkin spice treats without our friends and family thinking we’re weird? 

Whether it’s pumpkin bread, pumpkin bars, or pumpkin cookies, you guys know that I go through more cans of pumpkin puree and more batches of pumpkin pie spice than I can count every fall. 

Another of my favorite fall traditions is making special breakfasts on the weekends. There are few things more special than pulling a hot breakfast from the oven on a cool fall Saturday morning and kicking off the day with Eric and Elle around the breakfast table.

Overnight cinnamon rolls are one of my favorite fall breakfast options: I assemble the rolls the night before and bake them in the morning. Then the rolls are ready for my family to grab, along with a cup of coffee (or even a homemade pumpkin spice latte) or orange juice, whenever they roll out of bed.

Seeing my little family gathered around the breakfast table in their pajamas enjoying their homemade cinnamon rolls is a sight that warms my heart and makes me so grateful for this beautiful season, as cheesy as it sounds.

So when I can combine my love of cozy fall breakfasts with pumpkin spice? That’s just the best. 

This year, my family is asking for these Pumpkin Spice Cinnamon Rolls on repeat. 

And what can I say? I give the people what they want.

(more…)

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Chocolate Mousse Tart with Browned Butter Oat Crust | Raaka Baking Chocolate

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One of my very favorite chocolate makers in NYC, Raaka Chocolate, is launching a new line of baking chocolate today! They are starting with two delicious varieties,  Oat Milk 58% cacao that I used in this chocolate mousse tart and Maple Dark 75% cacao. They will launch two more varieties in the coming weeks, and they have cacao powder and cacao nibs too! I got a sneak peek of all four varieties and I have enjoyed baking with (and just plain eating) these little chocolate discs so much. 

This decadent Chocolate Mousse Tart with Browned Butter Oat Crust is definitely fit for a special occasion, but isn’t too tricky to put together. The crust is the easy-peasy pat in the pan variety and the mousse is just as good on its own as it is in this buttery, crisp, toasty crust. You could even just make the chocolate mousse and skip the crust all together, but don’t skip the billowy whipped cream! 

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 Raaka Chocolate is unroasted which highlights all of the natural fruitiness of cacao so it’s flavor profile might be a little different than your everyday chocolate, and it is so, so tasty. They are also a company that values the community of growers, producers, and makers whose livelihoods depend on cacao and chocolate and are very transparent about their sourcing practices. You can read all about it on their website. Let me know if you try it!

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 This post was sponsored by Raaka Chocolate.


Oat Milk Chocolate Mousse Tart with Browned Butter Oat Crust

Makes one 9-inch tart

This decadent chocolate tart is more than the sum of its parts. The toasty-oaty crust provides a perfect base for rich and decadent chocolate mousse made with Raaka’s sublimely delicious Oat Milk chocolate. The mousse is delicious on its own for gluten free folks too. 

Browned Butter Oat Crust

1/2 cup (115g) unsalted butter

2/3 cup (60g) rolled oats

1 cup (130g) all purpose flour

1/3 cup (35g) confectioner’s sugar

1/2 teaspoon kosher salt

Water, as needed

Oat Milk Chocolate Mousse

2 tablespoons granulated sugar

2 tablespoons strong coffee or coffee liqueur

3 large egg yolks

Pinch salt

4 ounces Raaka Oat Milk Chocolate finely chopped, plus a little more to garnish

1 1/4 cups heavy cream, divided

Heat your oven to 375ºF and lightly grease a 9-inch removable bottom tart pan.

Brown the butter: Melt the butter in a small saucepan set over medium heat. Make sure to use a pan with a light colored interior so you can see the milk solids change color. Continue to cook the butter, stirring occasionally, scraping the milk solids off of the bottom and sides of the pan as necessary. After a few minutes the milk solids should turn golden brown and smell toasty. Transfer the toasty browned butter to a heat safe container and let it cool slightly.

Add the oats to the bowl of a food processor and pulse a few times until the oats are broken up a bit. Add the flour, confectioners sugar, and salt and pulse about 10 times or until the mixture looks like coarse sand. Drizzle the butter into the mixture and pulse until combined. The mixture should hold together easily when you squeeze it in your hands. If it seems very dry, add water 1 teaspoon at a time until it holds together.

Pour the mixture into the prepared tart pan and press it evenly into the bottom and sides of the pan. Use the bottom of a measuring cup to make the crust smooth and even. Bake the crust until it is golden brown, 20-25 minutes. Set it on a rack to cool completely.

When the shell is cool, make the mousse. 

Whisk 3/4 cup of the heavy cream to soft peaks and store in the refrigerator while you make the rest of the mousse.

Set a heatsafe bowl over a pan of simmering water to make a double boiler. Add the sugar, coffee, egg yolks, and a pinch of salt to the bowl and whisk the mixture until it is very hot to the touch (about 160ºF), pale yellow and doubled in volume. 

Add the chopped chocolate and whisk until smooth. Off of the heat, add a heaping spoonful of the whipped cream and whisk it into the chocolate mixture to lighten it a bit. Add the rest of the whipped cream and gently fold to combine. Pour the mousse into the cooled shell, smooth the top, and refrigerate until firm, about one hour. Just before serving whip the remaining 1/2 cup cream to soft peaks dollop it over the mousse. Grate a bit more chocolate over the top and serve.

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Homemade Pizza Dough

I know it sounds cheesy, but pizza really is my favorite food. It has endless possibilities and usually includes my favorite things: bread, tomatoes, and cheese. And when you make your pizza dough from scratch, pizza is one of the cheapest dinners you can make. The best part? All of the ingredients for pizza dough […]

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I know it sounds cheesy, but pizza really is my favorite food. It has endless possibilities and usually includes my favorite things: bread, tomatoes, and cheese. And when you make your pizza dough from scratch, pizza is one of the cheapest dinners you can make. The best part? All of the ingredients for pizza dough are pantry staples, so you can make this whenever without planning ahead. AND it’s freezer-friendly so you can always have some stashed and ready to thaw on a moment’s notice.

Originally posted 7-2-2010, updated 6-16-2020.

Close up of a homemade pepperoni pizza

What is in Homemade Pizza Dough?

While there are several styles of pizza dough out there in the world, this particular recipe is super simple and only includes:

  • Water
  • Yeast
  • Sugar
  • Salt
  • Flour
  • Olive Oil

That’s it! Really! This particular recipe creates a crust that is crispy on the outside, but still tender on the inside. If you use a rolling pin to really compact the dough and roll it thin, you’ll get a result that more closely resembles a crispy thin-crust pizza. Toss the dough by hand, gently stretching the dough and leaving some thickness will give you that crispy-yet-tender finish, with a few of those awesome big bubbles.

What Kind of Yeast Can I Use?

The instructions below will work with active dry or instant yeast.

How to Freeze Pizza Dough

After kneading the pizza dough, form it into a ball, coat the dough ball with a little oil to keep it from sticking to the plastic, then wrap tightly in plastic wrap. Place the plastic wrapped dough ball in a heavy duty freezer zip top bag, label, date, and place it in the freezer!

How to Thaw Pizza Dough

To thaw your frozen pizza dough, place it in the refrigerator the night before you intend to bake the pizza. The dough will rise slightly as it thaws. The other option is to allow the dough to thaw at room temperature, which will take about two hours. You’ll want to unwrap the pizza dough from the plastic before letting it thaw. Place the frozen dough in an oiled bowl and cover loosely with a clean towel as it thaws.

Pizza sauce being spread onto a stretched pizza dough with toppings on the sides

Make some homemade pizza sauce to go with your pizza crust!

 
Close up of a baked homemade pepperoni pizza

Homemade Pizza Dough

Homemade pizza dough is easy and costs pennies on the dollar compared to store bought. Make a batch now and freeze it for later!
Total Cost $0.62 recipe / $0.16 serving
Prep Time 1 hour 30 minutes
Cook Time 12 minutes
Total Time 1 hour 42 minutes
Servings 4
Calories 272.3kcal
Author Beth - Budget Bytes

Ingredients

  • 3/4 cups warm water $0.00
  • 1 tsp yeast* $0.08
  • 1 Tbsp sugar $0.05
  • 2 cups all-purpose flour $0.30
  • 1 tsp salt $0.03
  • 1 Tbsp olive oil $0.16

Instructions

  • Dissolve the yeast and sugar in the warm water. Allow the yeast water to sit for about 5 minutes, or until a thick layer of foam develops on top.
  • While you’re waiting for the yeast, add 1 cup of the flour and the salt to a large bowl, then stir well to combine.
  • Add the olive oil to the yeast water, then pour the mixture into the bowl with the flour and salt. Begin adding more flour to the bowl, ¼ to ½ cup at a time, until it forms a ball of dough that can no longer be stirred with a spoon.
  • Turn the dough out onto a lightly floured work surface, then knead for about 5 minutes, adding a little flour as you go to keep it from sticking.
  • At this point you have three options: use the dough tonight (one hour after kneading), use it tomorrow (allowing it to rise in the refrigerator over night) or within a month (freezing the dough).

To Use the Pizza Dough Same Day

  • Place the kneaded dough back into the mixing bowl, drizzle with a little oil, then turn the dough to coat it with oil. Cover the bowl loosely and let the dough rise in a warm place for one hour, or until it is double in volume.
  • Once risen, stretch or roll the dough out to a 14 to 16-inch circle, place on a pizza pan, and top with your favorite sauce and toppings. Bake the pizza in a preheated 450ºF oven for 10-12 minutes or until the edges are brown and crispy.

To Use the Pizza Dough the Next Day

  • Allowing the dough to proof (rise) slowly in the refrigerator for 18-24 hours gives the dough even more flavor. Form the dough into a ball and coat with oil. Place the dough in a covered container and refrigerate for 18-24 hours. Allow the dough to come to room temperature before stretching, topping, and baking.

To Freeze the Dough for Future Use

  • Form the kneaded dough into a ball, coat it with oil, wrap tightly in plastic wrap, then place in a freezer bag and transfer to the freezer. When you are ready to use the dough, simply place it on the counter for one hour prior to use. The dough should be at room temperature before stretching, topping, and baking.

Notes

*active dry or instant yeast

Nutrition

Serving: 1serving | Calories: 272.3kcal | Carbohydrates: 51.1g | Protein: 6.85g | Fat: 4.18g | Sodium: 592.4mg | Fiber: 1.98g

Scroll down for the step by step photos!

Close up of a bubble in a slice of pizza

How to Make Pizza Dough – Step By Step Photos

yeast being added to a measuring cup with water

Start by dissolving 1 tsp active dry yeast (or instant yeast) and 1 Tbsp sugar in ¾ cup warm water.

Foamy yeast water in a glass measuring cup

Let the yeast water sit for about 5 minutes, or until a thick layer of foam develops on top.

Flour and salt in a bowl

While the yeast is blooming, combine 1 cup all-purpose flour and 1 tsp salt in a mixing bowl. Stir until combined.

Yeast water and oil being poured into bowl with flour and salt

Add 1 Tbsp olive oil to the yeast water, then pour it into the bowl with the flour and salt. Stir until the mixture is fairly smooth.

More flour being added to the bowl

Begin adding more flour, about ¼ to ½ cup at a time, until you can no longer stir the mixture with a spoon.

Dough ball in the mixing bowl

Once it forms a ball that you can no longer stir with a spoon, turn it out onto a clean, lightly floured work surface.

Kneaded dough ball

Knead the dough for about 5 minutes, adding a little flour as you go to prevent it from sticking. Once kneaded, you should have used about 2 cups flour total, since the first step of stirring salt into the flour. Total flour amount can vary depending on humidity and other factors. At this point you can let the dough rise and make a pizza same day, refrigerate the dough and make pizza with it the next day, or freeze the dough for future use.

oil being poured onto a ball of dough in a mixing bowl.

To make a pizza same day: Place the dough ball back into the mixing bowl, add just a small drizzle of oil, and turn the dough to coat it in the oil. The oil will keep the dough from drying out as it rises.

Risen pizza dough in the bowl

Cover the bowl loosely and let the dough rise for about an hour, or until it is double in volume.

Pizza sauce being spread on stretched dough

Preheat your oven to 450ºF. Stretch or roll the pizza dough out to 14-16 inches and place on a pizza pan. Add your favorite pizza sauce…

Cheese and pepperoni added to pizza dough

And your favorite toppings…

Baked homemade pizza

Bake in the fully preheated oven for 10-12 minutes, or until the crust and toppings are browned.

Side view of a slice of pizza being lifted from the pan

Slice and enjoy!

Try These Homemade Pizza Flavors:

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No-Knead Focaccia

Once you try focaccia, you’ll never go back to plain bread! This hearty No-Knead Focaccia is coated in olive oil and herbs, making every bite full of delicious flavor. And the best part? It only takes about 5 minutes of hands-on work to make an amazing loaf. This delicious bread pretty much makes itself! Originally […]

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Once you try focaccia, you’ll never go back to plain bread! This hearty No-Knead Focaccia is coated in olive oil and herbs, making every bite full of delicious flavor. And the best part? It only takes about 5 minutes of hands-on work to make an amazing loaf. This delicious bread pretty much makes itself!

Originally published 4-30-2011, updated 5-28-2020.

 A stack of focaccia slices, sides visible showing off bubbles

How Does No-Knead Bread Work?

When making regular bread, you have to use a lot of elbow grease kneading the dough to make the gluten strands line up and form a sort of matrix that gives the dough strength and texture. With no-knead bread, the dough is allowed to ferment overnight. During fermentation enzymes break down the gluten in a process called autolysis, which makes it easier for them to untangle, line up, and form the matrix that usually takes a lot of kneading to form. 

An added bonus is that overnight fermentation adds a lot of flavor to the bread. AND, since the yeast has so much time to grow and multiply, you only need to use ¼ tsp yeast, compared to about 2 tsp for a normal loaf of bread! Win-win!

What Kind of Yeast Can I Use?

This no-knead style bread is a little unique because the yeast is combined with dry flour, instead of being mixed with water and allowed to “proof” first. Because it’s not proofed first, you’ll need a specific kind of yeast—instant yeast or bread machine yeast. These types of yeast do not need to be “woken up” in warm water before being added to bread dough.

What Do You Serve With Focaccia?

Focaccia is such a versatile bread! It makes a great side dish with just about any meal, but I think it’s particularly nice with soups and stews. It’s hearty texture makes it great for dipping, dunking, and sopping up sauces, stews, and soups. It’s also fantastic for sandwiches, especially pressed sandwiches like paninis. You can also use this bread to make pizzas or flatbreads. Simply top it with your favorite cheese, meat, or vegetables and bake again until the cheese is melted and bubbly.

Freeze the Extras!

This makes a BIG batch of focaccia bread, so I highly suggest freezing the leftovers. Most bread, including focaccia, freeze beautifully, so you can have homemade bread with any meal without a lot of work. To freeze the focaccia, simply let it cool completely until it is room temperature, cut it into slices (whichever size or shape you prefer), then place it in a gallon-sized freezer bag. The frozen no-knead focaccia thaws quickly at room temperature.

Can I Use Whole Wheat Flour?

Yes, you can substitute some of the all-purpose flour for whole wheat. Using all whole-wheat flour generally creates a very heavy and dense bread, so I highly suggest using only some, up to 50%, whole wheat flour. You may need to use slightly more water, as whole wheat flour absorbs more moisture than all-purpose flour.

A hand holding a slice of focaccia so you can see the bubbles in the side

 
A stack of no knead focaccia slices viewed from the side

No-knead Focaccia Bread

Fresh, hearty focaccia bread is incredibly simple to make with this no-knead method. It's perfect for sandwiches or dunking into soups and stews. 
Total Cost $1.31 recipe / $0.11 serving
Prep Time 16 hours
Cook Time 20 minutes
Total Time 16 hours 20 minutes
Servings 12 squares
Calories 177.83kcal
Author Beth - Budget Bytes

Ingredients

  • 4 cups all-purpose flour $0.61
  • 1/4 tsp instant yeast $0.02
  • 1 1/2 tsp salt $0.03
  • 2 cups water $0.00
  • 2 Tbsp olive oil, divided $0.32
  • 2 Tbsp cornmeal $0.03
  • 1 Tbsp Italian seasoning $0.30

Instructions

  • The night before, combine the flour, salt and yeast in a bowl. Stir until everything is evenly combined. Add the water and stir until it forms one cohesive, sticky, shaggy ball of dough with no dry flour left on the bottom of the bowl. If there is still dry flour in bowl, add a little water (1-2 Tbsp) until the dough comes together (scroll down to the step by step photos for examples). Loosely cover the bowl and let sit at room temperature for 12-18 hours.
  • The next day the dough will be wet, bubbly, and very fluffy. Dust the top of the dough with some flour, then scrape the dough from the sides of the bowl. Turn the dough over on itself a few times until it forms a ball in the center of the bowl.
  • Line a baking sheet with foil then drizzle with 1 Tbsp olive oil. Spread the oil to coat the surface of the foil, then sprinkle cornmeal on top of the oil.
  • Transfer the dough to the baking sheet. Stretch and pat the dough out into a large rectangle. You may need to dust your hands with flour throughout this process to keep the dough from sticking.
  • Drizzle olive oil over the surface of the dough and use a soft brush to spread it evenly over the surface. Sprinkle the Italian seasoning (or any type of herbs) over top. Let the dough rise for another hour.
  • Preheat the oven to 425ºF. Using your fingers, press dimples into the risen dough. Bake the focaccia for 20-25 minutes in the preheated oven or until the surface is golden brown. After removing from the oven, allow the focaccia to cool before slicing and serving.

Nutrition

Serving: 1sqaure | Calories: 177.83kcal | Carbohydrates: 33.13g | Protein: 4.45g | Fat: 2.69g | Sodium: 356.03mg | Fiber: 1.22g

Try More No-Knead Bread Recipes:

Three slices of no-knead focaccia piled on a wooden cutting board

 

How to Make No-Knead Focaccia – Step By Step Photos

Flour Yeast and salt in a bowl

Start with 4 cups all-purpose flour, ¼ tsp instant yeast, and 1.5 tsp salt. Stir them together until everything is well combined.

Water being poured into flour mixture

Add 2 cups water to the flour mixture. This part will require a little flexibility on your part. You may need to add slightly less or slightly more water depending on the ambient humidity in your home and fluctuations with measuring the flour. I’ll show you what to look for in the next photos.

Dough that is too dry

Stir the water into the flour until it forms a ball of sticky dough and there is no more dry flour left on the bottom of the bowl. In the photo above, the dough is too dry. You can see dry flour on the bottom of the bowl and the dough ball is not cohesive. If this is your dough, add a tablespoon or two more water.

Sticky dough ball

Your dough should look like this. Sticky, but not slimy or shiny, and no dry flour on the bottom of the bowl. This style of dough is much more wet than traditional bread dough. Cover the bowl loosely and allow it to sit at room temperature for 12-18 hours.

Bubbly, fermented dough

After 12-18 hours the dough will look very bubbly and large, like this. Am I weird for thinking that’s gorgeous??

Pull dough from sides of the bowl

Sprinkle a little flour over the dough to keep your hands from sticking and pull the dough from the sides of the bowl. Turn the dough over onto itself a few times until it forms a sort of ball. Keep your hands well floured as you do this.

Dough ball in the bowl

This is what the dough looks like after I folded it onto itself a few times. The gluten matrix is well developed. You can tell by how smooth it is and the air bubbles trapped right under the surface.

Olive oil being drizzled onto a baking sheet

Line a baking sheet with foil, then drizzle 1 Tbsp olive oil over the surface. Use your hands to spread the oil to evenly coat the surface of the foil, then sprinkle about 2 Tbsp cornmeal over the oil.

Shaped focaccia on baking sheet, topped with more oil and herbs

Transfer the ball of dough to the prepared baking sheet and press and stretch it out until it fills the entire baking sheet. Drizzle one more tablespoon of olive oil over the surface of the dough, then sprinkle 1 Tbsp Italian seasoning over the surface (you can use a mix of basil, oregano, and red pepper if you don’t have Italian seasoning).

Fingers making indentations in unbaked focaccia

Let the dough rise for one hour (or a little more if your ambient room temperature is on the cool side). When you get close to the end of the rise time, begin preheating your oven to 425ºF. Use your fingers to make dimples all over the dough.

Baked focaccia on the baking sheet

Once the focaccia has risen and the oven is fully preheated, transfer the baking sheet to the oven and bake the focaccia for 20-25 minutes, or until it is nicely golden brown on top.

Focaccia on baking sheet, cut open

Look at those gorgeous bubbles!

No Knead Focaccia loaf cut into squares

Let the bread cool before slicing. You can slice it into 12 squares, or into strips, which are nice for dipping and dunking into soups and stews.

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Easy No-Knead Cinnamon Bun Bread

Easy No-Knead Cinnamon Bun Bread

Freshly baked cinnamon buns are one of the most indulgent baked goods that you can treat yourself to. But it takes time and effort to put together a batch of made-from-scratch cinnamon buns, and there are often times when you might want to treat yourself without waiting around. This Easy …

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Easy No-Knead Cinnamon Bun Bread

Freshly baked cinnamon buns are one of the most indulgent baked goods that you can treat yourself to. But it takes time and effort to put together a batch of made-from-scratch cinnamon buns, and there are often times when you might want to treat yourself without waiting around. This Easy No-Knead Cinnamon Bun Bread is a recipe for a yeast bread that tastes just like cinnamon buns – completely with sweet cinnamon swirls in the dough – but can be made in a matter of minutes with no rolling required.

This bread starts with a yeast dough that can be mixed up in one bowl. It can be made with active dry or rapid rise yeast. The dough is quite wet and doesn’t require any kneading to get it to come together – in fact, you can easily mix it up by hand using only a spatula. Once the dough is mixed up, transfer it to a baking dish and allow it to rest for a few minutes before adding the cinnamon bun topping.

The topping for this bread is basically the same mixture that you would use as a filling in a more traditional cinnamon bun. It is a mixture of butter, brown sugar and cinnamon that is stirred together until it is moist and uniform. The mixture is sprinkled evenly on top of the rested dough and pressed in with your fingertips. This method is the same one that I use to add “dimples” to focaccia bread: pushing your fingertips firmly down into the dough to make indentations. In this recipe, it pushes the filling into the dough, which creates pockets and swirls when the bread bakes.

While the bread is rested for a short time during the preparation process, it doesn’t need to rise until it is doubled in size. It will actually rise a bit more in the oven as it starts to bake! The bread will spring back when pressed at the end of the baking time and the cinnamon-sugar mixture will be bubbling deliciously around the edges of the pan. Allow the bread to cool for at least 30 minutes before adding a vanilla drizzle and cutting it up to serve. The bread is at its best the day it is baked, but leftovers can be reheated the next day, as well.

This simple recipe doesn’t require any previous baking experience, so don’t be afraid to get your hands in the dough – minimally, of course! – and give this delicious cinnamon bun bread a try!

Easy No-Knead Cinnamon Bun Bread
2 cups all purpose flour
1/3 cup sugar
1/4 tsp salt
4 tsp active dry or rapid rise yeast
2/3 cup warm milk (100-110F; low fat is fine)
4 tbsp vegetable oil
1/2 tsp vanilla extract
1 large egg

Filling/Topping
4 tbsp butter, room temperature
3/4 cup brown sugar
1 1/2 tsp ground cinnamon
1/4 tsp salt

Icing
1 cup powdered sugar
1-2 tbsp milk
1/2 tsp vanilla extract

Lightly grease an 8×8-inch square baking pan.
In a large bowl, combine flour, sugar and salt. Dissolve the yeast in a measuring cup filled with the warmed milk and allow it to sit for 5 minutes, until slightly foamy. Then stir milk mixture, vegetable oil, vanilla extract and egg into the flour mixture. Mix well, until very smooth. Transfer the dough (it will be a very soft dough) into prepared pan, cover with plastic wrap and let rest for 15 minutes.
While the dough rests, prepare the filling. Mix together butter, brown sugar, cinnamon and salt in a small bowl using a fork or spatula until all the butter has been incorporated into the sugar and mixture is crumbly. Sprinkle evenly on top of rested dough and press the mixture down into the dough with your fingertips. You do not need to try to stir in the topping, but leave the dough with deep “dimples” all over the surface. Cover with plastic wrap and let rest for 15 more minutes
Preheat oven to 350F. Bake for about 30 minutes, until bread is lightly browned at the edges and the center of the bread springs back when lightly pressed. The sugar mixture on top may still be bubbling.
Cool for at least 30 minutes before whisking the powdered sugar, milk and vanilla together to form an icing and drizzling it onto the bread.
Serve warm or at room temperature.

Serves 9.

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English Muffin Batter Bread

English Muffin Batter Bread

English muffins are one of my favorite breads to toast. They not only have a great flavor, but they are full of nooks and crannies to fill with butter and jam. You can make them at home, but it’s much easier to make this English Muffin Batter Bread, instead! …

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English Muffin Batter Bread

English muffins are one of my favorite breads to toast. They not only have a great flavor, but they are full of nooks and crannies to fill with butter and jam. You can make them at home, but it’s much easier to make this English Muffin Batter Bread, instead! The yeast bread is called a batter bread because it is made from a batter and requires no kneading. The finished batter bread captures the flavor of an english muffin in a loaf form that anyone can bake.

When I say that this bread requires no kneading, I’m not kidding! It can be mixed up in one bowl and doesn’t require any special tools to make, although you will need active dry yeast for this recipe. Once the yeast has bloomed, all the ingredients are combined into a thick, smooth batter that is poured into a grease loaf pan to rise. After an hour or so, it goes directly into the oven to bake.

The finished bread has a fairly open texture that is similar to the holey-texture of an English muffin. The baking soda in the batter helps to create this texture. While it is added as leavening in many quick breads, baking soda is in this recipe to supplement the yeast. It begins to react as soon as it is stirred into the batter, creating all kinds of tiny air bubbles. As the bread rises and bakes, these bubbles expand even more and then set – leaving you with a bread that is a fantastic texture for toasting.

English Muffin Batter Bread

Don’t forget to lightly grease your loaf pan before pouring in the batter to ensure that your loaf comes out easily. Allow it to cool completely before slicing it into thick pieces with a serrated knife. The bread is good on its own, but it really shines after it has been toasted and that is my favorite way to serve it. The bread will keep for at least a day or two after baking, in the event that you can’t eat it all in one day.

(Note: This post originally appeared in September 2005. The post has been updated, but it’s amazing that this recipe is just as popular then as it is now!)

English Muffin Batter Bread
3/4 cup water, warm (approximately 100-110 F)
1/4 ounce active dry yeast (1 package/ 2 1/2 tsp)
2 tsp sugar
3 cups all purpose flour, divided
1 tsp salt
1/4 tsp baking soda
1/2 cup milk, warm (approximately 100-110 F)

Lightly grease a 9×5-inch loaf pan.
In a small bowl, 1/4 cup of water with active dry yeast and sugar. Stir, then allow mixture to sit for 5 minutes until yeast is foamy.
Transfer yeast mixture to a large bowl, along 2 cups of flour, salt, baking soda, milk and remaining water. Mix until a smooth batter forms. Gradually stir in remaining flour until batter is thick and uniform. This can also be done in the stand mixer using a dough hook.
Pour batter into prepared pan and cover with plastic wrap.
Allow dough to rise in a warm place for 1 hour, or until about doubled in size.
Preheat the oven to 400 F. Bake the loaf for about 30 minutes, until the top of the loaf is golden and it sounds hollow when tapped. An instant read thermometer inserted into the center of the loaf should read 190-200F.
Turn bread out onto a wire rack to cool completely before slicing.

Makes 1 loaf.

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Maple Chai Cinnamon Rolls

Maple Chai Cinnamon Rolls are a special twist on a classic brunch fave! Filled with warm chai spices and topped with maple frosting, these sweet rolls are sure to be devoured by friends and family this holiday season. This post is sponsored by Fleischmann’s® Yeast as part of the Bake It Yourself Blogger Program. Thank […]

The post Maple Chai Cinnamon Rolls appeared first on My Baking Addiction.

        

Maple Chai Cinnamon Rolls are a special twist on a classic brunch fave! Filled with warm chai spices and topped with maple frosting, these sweet rolls are sure to be devoured by friends and family this holiday season.

Chai cinnamon roll with maple frosting on a white plate with a fork

This post is sponsored by Fleischmann’s® Yeast as part of the Bake It Yourself Blogger Program. Thank you for continuing to support the brands that make My Baking Addiction possible.

Do you ever make up flavor combinations in your head, and then get super excited once they move from paper to recipe?

Is that just me?

Well, even if it is, I’m really excited to share today’s recipe with you.

I’m a big fan of chai. Once the weather turns cool, I am all about grabbing a chai latte at my local coffee shop.

Did you know that chai literally means tea? So when someone asks for a Chai Tea Latte, they’re actually asking for a Tea Tea Latte.

It makes me giggle every time.

Anyway – these Maple Chai Cinnamon Rolls are the bomb.com, just like I hoped they would be.

Even if you’ve never made cinnamon rolls before, I think you’ll be surprised at how easy it can be, and when the scents of maple and chai are wafting through your kitchen, you’ll know it was worth the effort. (more…)

The post Maple Chai Cinnamon Rolls appeared first on My Baking Addiction.