The Home Edit’s Walmart Collection Will Help You Organize *Everything*

The Home Edit has been one of my low-key favorite Netflix shows. Clea Shearer and Joanna Teplin are bubbly and approachable; the show gives us a look at their famous clients’ McMansions; and there is tons of practical advice on editing, categorizing, c…

The Home Edit has been one of my low-key favorite Netflix shows. Clea Shearer and Joanna Teplin are bubbly and approachable; the show gives us a look at their famous clients’ McMansions; and there is tons of practical advice on editing, categorizing, containing, and maintaining everything from clothes and shoes to laundry and kitchen essentials.

But, as much as I follow through on Shearer and Teplin’s tips, I haven’t been able to commit to one of their biggest: clear bins that let me see everything in their rightful place. They’re surprisingly expensive for what they are, and I always think that I can get the same result without them. Spoiler: I can’t. Thankfully for my wallet, The Home Edit has launched a budget-friendly collection of storage organizers at Walmart.

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Our Go-To Methods for Storing Fresh Ginger

From tummy troubles to baked goods, fresh ginger has many uses in the kitchen. It’s packed with flavor, and a little bit goes a long way. If you’ve ever bought fresh ginger root, you know that you can spend 50 cents on a 2-inch piece of ginger that will last for weeks—but how do you store ginger to make sure that it stays as fresh as possible?

How to Store Fresh Ginger

Before you pick up any piece of ginger from the grocery store, choose one carefully. Look for a piece of ginger that is quite firm to the touch and has smooth skin; any soft spots or slightly wrinkly skin is a sign that it’s already past its peak.

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From tummy troubles to baked goods, fresh ginger has many uses in the kitchen. It’s packed with flavor, and a little bit goes a long way. If you’ve ever bought fresh ginger root, you know that you can spend 50 cents on a 2-inch piece of ginger that will last for weeks—but how do you store ginger to make sure that it stays as fresh as possible?

How to Store Fresh Ginger

Before you pick up any piece of ginger from the grocery store, choose one carefully. Look for a piece of ginger that is quite firm to the touch and has smooth skin; any soft spots or slightly wrinkly skin is a sign that it’s already past its peak.

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We Tested the Best Ways to Store Cut Avocados

Unless you’re making a giant batch of guacamole (can I come over?), there’s a good chance that you’ll be left with half an avocado that you need to store after making toast or salsa. Uncut avocados can quickly turn from a beautiful green color to brown…

Unless you’re making a giant batch of guacamole (can I come over?), there’s a good chance that you’ll be left with half an avocado that you need to store after making toast or salsa. Uncut avocados can quickly turn from a beautiful green color to brown in what seems like mere minutes. So what's the best way to store half an avocado to delay its inevitable browning?

How to Store Half An Avocado

Storing half an avocado is similar to storing guacamole, which is to say lemon or lime juice is your best friend. The acidity from the lemon juice will help to prevent mashed or cut avocados from turning brown quickly. The best way to store half an avocado is to squeeze a little bit of juice over the cut side of the avocado, cover it with plastic wrap tightly, and store it in the refrigerator.

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How to Store Champagne & Sparkling Wines for Bottomless Bubbly

It’s no secret that we love Champagne. We’ve talked about the best way to go about opening a bottle of Champagne safely and how to keep the bubbles fizzy for days once you have opened it. We’ve even shared more than a dozen of our favorite Champagne co…

It’s no secret that we love Champagne. We’ve talked about the best way to go about opening a bottle of Champagne safely and how to keep the bubbles fizzy for days once you have opened it. We've even shared more than a dozen of our favorite Champagne cocktail recipes. But the most important question of all is: How the heck do you store Champagne?

Listen, I know Champagne is expensive (even though it doesn’t always have to be), and you may be holding on to a special bottle of Veuve Clicquot or a celebratory vintage for a momentous occasion. When storing Champagne, you want to first and foremost prevent the bottle from breaking haphazardly while also keeping the cork moist and protecting the good stuff on the inside.

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How to Store Royal Icing in Between Batches

It’s the most wonderful time of the year—royal icing season! Royal icing is a thick icing that dries hard and has the shine of a model’s hair in a Pantene commercial. It’s made using powdered sugar, meringue powder or dried egg whites, which not only s…

It’s the most wonderful time of the year—royal icing season! Royal icing is a thick icing that dries hard and has the shine of a model’s hair in a Pantene commercial. It’s made using powdered sugar, meringue powder or dried egg whites, which not only stabilizes the icing, but allows it to have a glossy finish. Royal icing season rolls in with the tide of every major holiday, when home bakers suddenly bring out every festive cookie cutter they own to cut stars for Hanukkah, bells and trees for Christmas, eggs for Easter, and pumpkins for Halloween.

Royal icing is the key to making beautiful, intricately decorated sugar cookies. But we can’t have it all, right? Despite its beauty, royal icing can be extremely temperamental and finicky, which is why it’s so important to whip it up well and store it properly when not in use.

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How to Store Sugar Cookies, Frosted or Unfrosted

You’ve baked the dough, chilled it, rolled it and cut it into the shapes of stars and trees. You’ve baked a batch and then another, decorated each cookie carefully with piping bags filled with royal icing, eaten a few (and then a few more), and now it’…

You’ve baked the dough, chilled it, rolled it and cut it into the shapes of stars and trees. You’ve baked a batch and then another, decorated each cookie carefully with piping bags filled with royal icing, eaten a few (and then a few more), and now it’s time to store them. But what’s the best way to do that without ruining the icing and decorated sugar on frosted sugar cookies?

How to Store Sugar Cookies

Once your sugar cookie recipe is fully baked and decorated, properly store them “in a tin or an airtight container, once they're cool,” says Food52 community member Brette W. ChefJune agrees with this method to help the cookies stay fresh and recommends “[separating] the rows with waxed paper to ensure they don't stick to the ones above and below.” (You can also use parchment if that’s what you have!)

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How to Store Homemade Fudge All Holiday Season Long

We are firm believers that you don’t need an occasion to bake something sweet, whether it be a layer cake worthy of a birthday party or a batch of cookies. The same can be said for fudge. While this confection is often seen displayed in a long lineup of treats at a holiday party, it can and should be enjoyed year-round. But since it’s the holidays and you asked, we’re here to explain the best way to store fudge, homemade or store-bought, on the counter or in the freezer.

Storing Fudge Anytime, Anywhere

Here’s the thing about homemade fudge: It’s temperamental. Way more temperamental than most cookies, cakes, brownies and bars, and quick breads, in fact. You need a candy thermometer, good-quality dark chocolate, and a careful eye to make it. Fudge is for all intents and purposes, candy. It’s important to store fudge properly to ensure that its creamy texture stays smooth and that its color remains a rich, dark chocolate brown.

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We are firm believers that you don’t need an occasion to bake something sweet, whether it be a layer cake worthy of a birthday party or a batch of cookies. The same can be said for fudge. While this confection is often seen displayed in a long lineup of treats at a holiday party, it can and should be enjoyed year-round. But since it’s the holidays and you asked, we’re here to explain the best way to store fudge, homemade or store-bought, on the counter or in the freezer.

Storing Fudge Anytime, Anywhere

Here’s the thing about homemade fudge: It’s temperamental. Way more temperamental than most cookies, cakes, brownies and bars, and quick breads, in fact. You need a candy thermometer, good-quality dark chocolate, and a careful eye to make it. Fudge is for all intents and purposes, candy. It’s important to store fudge properly to ensure that its creamy texture stays smooth and that its color remains a rich, dark chocolate brown.

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The No-Browning Way to Store Peeled Potatoes

One of the most revelatory things I learned while working as a line cook was that restaurant food is, essentially, very good reheated leftovers. Sure, proteins are seared on the spot and crème brûlée is torched to order, but everything else—risotto, pasta, green beans, soups—are made hours and days in advance. As soon as an order is fired (meaning the server tells the kitchen staff to start preparing the salads and steak tartare for table 11), everything is reheated in skillets and sizzler platters in the oven. What does this have to do with potatoes? Right. Those are prepared way in advance too.

Most mornings on the job, I was tasked with peeling pounds and pounds of russets for creamy potatoes. I would then cut the spuds with the largest restaurant-provided chef’s knife I could find and transfer them to a 22-quart container, cover them in water, and store the incredibly heavy container in the refrigerator. At that point, they would hang out, uncovered, for a few days until we were running low on mashed potatoes or hand cut French fries and it was time to make more.

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One of the most revelatory things I learned while working as a line cook was that restaurant food is, essentially, very good reheated leftovers. Sure, proteins are seared on the spot and crème brûlée is torched to order, but everything else—risotto, pasta, green beans, soups—are made hours and days in advance. As soon as an order is fired (meaning the server tells the kitchen staff to start preparing the salads and steak tartare for table 11), everything is reheated in skillets and sizzler platters in the oven. What does this have to do with potatoes? Right. Those are prepared way in advance too.

Most mornings on the job, I was tasked with peeling pounds and pounds of russets for creamy potatoes. I would then cut the spuds with the largest restaurant-provided chef’s knife I could find and transfer them to a 22-quart container, cover them in water, and store the incredibly heavy container in the refrigerator. At that point, they would hang out, uncovered, for a few days until we were running low on mashed potatoes or hand cut French fries and it was time to make more.

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How to Store Pomegranate Seeds During Peak Season

Although winter means cold temperatures in most parts of the country, desolate green spaces, and mugs of hot chocolate and hot toddies, there is an upside: It’s pomegranate season! When you choose pomegranates in the grocery store, don’t go for the one…

Although winter means cold temperatures in most parts of the country, desolate green spaces, and mugs of hot chocolate and hot toddies, there is an upside: It’s pomegranate season! When you choose pomegranates in the grocery store, don’t go for the one that is an invigorating deep red hue; instead, choose pomegranates that feel heavy for their size. You’ve selected the perfect pomegranate—one that feels slightly soft to the touch and has squared-off sides, two signs that pomegranates are ripe. Now you may be wondering, how do I store and remove the seeds?

How to Store Pomegranate Seeds

Pomegranate arils are perishable, plain and simple. These delicate, ruby red gems start to go bad as soon as you crack open a whole pomegranate and remove the seeds. “An unopened pomegranate can last up to one month at room temperature or up to two months in the refrigerator. If you don’t happen to finish all the juicy arils inside upon opening, don’t fret; the arils can be refrigerated in an airtight container for an additional week, ” said Stacey Anker, director of marketing for POM Wonderful.

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The Magical Shelf Organizer That Found Space Where There Was None

For someone who lives in a household of just two, my husband and I have a surprisingly large amount of dinnerware. Most of the pieces are leftovers from our first apartment, some are “new home” purchases we decided to invest in, and others are generous…

For someone who lives in a household of just two, my husband and I have a surprisingly large amount of dinnerware. Most of the pieces are leftovers from our first apartment, some are “new home” purchases we decided to invest in, and others are generous gifts from family and friends. Maybe it’s because I work in the food and kitchen space, but dinner plates, ice cream bowls, and more have just piled up to the point where I worry they’ll shatter under their own weight.

Normally, this wouldn’t bother me—I could rearrange the height of my cabinet shelves and organize the dinnerware better, and I could hide the stacks behind closed cabinet doors. If I can’t see it, it doesn’t exist, right? Well, joke’s on me because I have glass fronts on my cabinets and no matter how much rearranging I did, I still wouldn’t have enough shelves to fit everything.

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