How To Build A Slider Bar!

This slider bar is sponsored by St Pierre! I’m so excited to be partnering with them this summer to bring you delicious recipes. Now this is a bar I always want to go to! A slider bar, complete with bacon and cheese, ripe off-the-vine summer tomatoes and tons of my favorite condiments? Sign me up.  […]

The post How To Build A Slider Bar! appeared first on How Sweet Eats.

This slider bar is sponsored by St Pierre! I’m so excited to be partnering with them this summer to bring you delicious recipes.

Now this is a bar I always want to go to!

how to build a slider bar

A slider bar, complete with bacon and cheese, ripe off-the-vine summer tomatoes and tons of my favorite condiments? Sign me up. 

st pierre brioche slider rolls

I’m so excited to be partnering with St Pierre again today, featuring more of their Brioche Buns! It’s no secret how much I love their burger buns, and today, I’m showing you how to set up a slider bar with their Brioche Slider Rolls!

st pierre brioche slider buns

We ADORE these rolls. I’ve been buying them for years – in fact, they are Max’s favorite sandwich vehicle. He eats a sandwich almost everyday on the brioche slider roll. The size is perfect! 

how to build a slider bar

The St Pierre Brioche Slider Rolls are the highest quality; they truly taste like they were freshly baked. The rolls can elevate a simple lunch or dinner and make a regular day feel special and extraordinary. The rolls are light and airy, making them perfect for a slider bar. They have a slight hint of sweetness with an almost-buttery taste. 

SO good.

how to build a burger bar

If you have a copy of my book, The Pretty Dish, then you know how much I love a good “bar” or board! I have an entire chapter dedicated to fun bars to set up for entertaining family and friends. You can put your own spin on them and it’s exactly what makes them unique!

This board was also partially inspired by my mom’s summer burger plates. So many times when we make burgers at home, we just have the basics out – cheese, one or two condiments, maybe a slide of lettuce. But my mom NEVER made burgers without serving the works. Multiple condiments and pickles, different kinds of cheese, always lettuce, tomato and onion. She’s plate everything in a pretty way and while it wasn’t on one big board, it was the perfect setup to build your own burger.

And I’m convinced that’s why they always taste so good! 

how to build a slider bar

So here we are with our own little burger bar! A how-to, but really a use-what-you-love method, because you can add in whatever your favorite toppings may be! I made a classic slider bar here, but you can also do a themed one, such as a southwest slider bar or even a loaded slider bar with poached eggs and caramelized onions.

It’s up to you!

cheeseburgers, bacon, tomatoes, lettuce, picked onions

My favorite part of this is not only how quickly it comes together, but how fancy it looks. It just looks so fresh and delicious. It makes regular old burgers for dinner feel super special. You can do a scaled down burger bar for your immediate family at home, or if you have a few friends over outside, a larger slider bar to enjoy! 

how to build a slider bar

It’s a perfect entertaining idea for Labor Day too!

Tell me tell me: what would be on your ideal slider bar board? 

how to build a slider bar

How to Build a Slider Bar

Print

How to Build a Slider Board

This slider bar is a great way to serve burgers to your family and friends! Load up on toppings, vegetables and condiments. It's so fun!
Course Main Course
Cuisine American
Prep Time 45 minutes
Cook Time 15 minutes
Total Time 1 hour
Servings 6 to 8 people
Author How Sweet Eats

Ingredients

  • 2 pounds lean ground beef (I like 93% lean)
  • 1 teaspoon kosher salt
  • 1 package St Pierre Brioche Slider Rolls
  • lettuce leaves
  • sliced tomato
  • sliced onion
  • cooked bacon strips
  • pickled onions
  • sliced jalapeños
  • assorted cheese slices: cheddar, swiss, colby jack, pepper jack, havarti
  • condiments: ketchup, yellow mustard, mayo dijon

Instructions

  • Preheat your grill to the highest heat.
  • While the grill is preheating, prepare your slider bar ingredients. Slice the tomatoes, jalapeños and onions. Cook a few strips of bacon.
  • To prepare the sliders, season the ground beef with the salt. Form the beef into 12 slider-size burgers. Once the grill is hot, place the sliders directly on the grates. Cook the slides for 3 to 4 minutes, then flip again and cook for another 3 minutes. Place a slice of cheese on top for the last minute if you’d like a cheeseburger! You want the internal temperature of the beef to be 160 degrees F.
  • Assemble your slider bar - there is no right way to do it! Place your St Pierre Brioche Slider Rolls on the board. Arrange your condiments in small bowls with spoons, layer your lettuce, tomatoes and onions. When the burgers are ready, throw them on the board and build your own! This is such a fun idea for family and friends. You can include any ingredients you love - such as guacamole or sautéed mushrooms. Whatever kind of burgers you adore.

how to build a slider bar

Isn’t this a dream?!

The post How To Build A Slider Bar! appeared first on How Sweet Eats.

Millionaire’s Shortbread – Baking Basics

I remember being in primary school and checking a baking book out of the library – once home I photocopied a bunch of recipes from it, one of which was for Millionaire’s shortbread (also known as caramel slice in some parts of the world). It was something I’d had the shop-bought version of (in those clamshell plastic tubs!) and LOVED but had never made before. Now that I had a recipe for a homemade version there was no turning back! My brother and I made it many times – it’s such an easy bake and really requires minimal effort. They’re also VERY rich (hence why they’re called ‘Millionaire’s shortbread) so I often only need one square to satisfy my sweet tooth. Recipes for millionaire’s shortbread are usually pretty similar. I think the BBC /Nigella /Jamie Oliver versions all have the same components with very similar ingredients. A shortbread base, a caramel filling made using sweetened condensed milk from a tin, and a plain chocolate topping. Some versions use golden syrup in the filling (I make it without) to prevent the sugar from crystallising. I’ve tweaked the recipe here and there to make my best version which is what I’m posting […]

The post Millionaire’s Shortbread – Baking Basics appeared first on Izy Hossack – Top With Cinnamon.

a stack of millionaire's shortbread

I remember being in primary school and checking a baking book out of the library – once home I photocopied a bunch of recipes from it, one of which was for Millionaire’s shortbread (also known as caramel slice in some parts of the world). It was something I’d had the shop-bought version of (in those clamshell plastic tubs!) and LOVED but had never made before. Now that I had a recipe for a homemade version there was no turning back! My brother and I made it many times – it’s such an easy bake and really requires minimal effort. They’re also VERY rich (hence why they’re called ‘Millionaire’s shortbread) so I often only need one square to satisfy my sweet tooth.

overhead shot of squares of millionaire's shortbread with marbled chocolate

Recipes for millionaire’s shortbread are usually pretty similar. I think the BBC /Nigella /Jamie Oliver versions all have the same components with very similar ingredients. A shortbread base, a caramel filling made using sweetened condensed milk from a tin, and a plain chocolate topping. Some versions use golden syrup in the filling (I make it without) to prevent the sugar from crystallising. I’ve tweaked the recipe here and there to make my best version which is what I’m posting today!

I’ve even got a lil video below so you can see step-by-step how to make it 🙂

How to make crumbly shortbread for the base:

My shortbread base includes ground almonds – they are optional as you can swap out for rice flour/plain flour, but they do help the shortbread base stay nice and crumbly. They also have a nice buttery note to them and, unlike rice flour, don’t add a gritty texture.

Can you make millionaire’s shortbread without condensed milk?

Usually the caramel is made with sweetened condensed milk cooked with sugar and butter until it caramelises and thickens. For my filling, I simply swap the condensed milk for tinned carnation caramel (a.k.a. dulce de leche) instead. This tinned caramel is actually made from sweetened condensed milk so it’s essentially the same thing but it’s pre-caramelised for you! I like using the pre-made carnation caramel instead of sweetened condensed milk as I think it (1) has a deeper flavour, (2) it doesn’t seem to burn as easily as plain sweetened condensed milk does (3) it seems that post-pandemic, sweetened condensed milk is often out of stock in my supermarket whereas the carnation caramel is plentiful! You can’t just use the caramel straight from the tin though as it won’t set properly so you do have to cook it with sugar & butter to get it to thicken up.

All that said, you can use sweetened condensed milk here instead of the tinned caramel if that’s all you can get. It will work just as well but you might have to cook it for longer to get the right consistency AND you’ll have to be more careful that it doesn’t burn.

How do you thicken the caramel?

The caramel & butter & sugar are cooked on the stove in a pot, stirring often to melt everything together and thicken things up. This happens because the heat causes the mixture to boil, releasing some of the water in the ingredients as steam. It takes around 7 to 10 minutes of cooking over a medium-low heat to get this effect. You have to be careful as you thicken the mixture though as the high sugar content means it’s likely to burn easily – this can be prevented by stirring often (and scraping the base and corners of the pan with a silicone spatula). Bare in mind that the caramel will also thicken & harden as it cools in the fridge so it will seem thinner when it’s hot.

Why is my caramel too thin?

The caramel will be too thin if you haven’t cooked it for long enough on the stove. To test whether you’ve cooked the caramel for long enough, I like to use a simple trick. I place a small plate in the freezer before I start making the caramel. Once the caramel is looking darker and thicker than before I remove the plate from the freezer and place a little blob of hot caramel onto it. I set the plate aside for a minute or two so the caramel can cool down. Once cool to the touch, I run my finger through the blob. If the caramel is correctly cooked, the line will remain in the caramel. If it needs to be cooked for longer, the caramel will start to run back together, filling in the line.

a side shot of a square of millionaire's shortbread

What type of chocolate should you use?

I quite like a dark chocolate for the topping as it really helps to balance out the sweetness of the other ingredients. A 70% or even 80% are great but go with what you know you like. For this batch, I swirled on a bit of white chocolate into the dark for decoration but that’s totally optional.

How to cut Millionaire’s shortbread neatly:

I have a kitchen blowtorch which I use to gently warm a sharp knife before cutting into the shortbread. This helps to create the neatest edge as it melts through the chocolate and caramel as you apply pressure, meaning the chocolate wont crack or cause the caramel to squash out! If you don’t want to mess around with a blowtorch, you can fill a jug with boiling water and pop your knife blade in there for a minute or so. Wipe the blade dry before using it as it’ll be wet! With both these methods be careful not to touch the blade while you cut as it’ll be very hot. Also, wipe the blade with a piece of kitchen roll between cuts to ensure the knife is clean & dry.

Can you put it in the fridge or freezer?

I recommend storing the cut squares in an airtight container in the fridge. It’ll ensure they keep for longer (up to 1 week!) and will stop the chocolate/caramel getting all melty. You can freeze these too – cut them into squares and pop into a resealable sandwich bag for up to 1 month. Let them defrost at room temp before eating.

Other bar recipes:

Millonaire's Shortbread

Millonaire's Shortbread

Yield: 16 squares
Prep Time: 30 minutes
Cook Time: 30 minutes
Additional Time: 30 minutes
Total Time: 1 hour 30 minutes

A British classic traybake, so easy & perfect for bakesales! Made with tinned carnation caramel (dulce de leche) or sweetened condensed milk on a crumbly shortbread base with a snappy dark chocolate topping.

Ingredients

Shortbread:

  • 50g (1/2 cup) ground almonds
  • 60g (1/4 cup) caster sugar or granulated sugar
  • 200g (1 2/3 cup) plain white flour
  • pinch of salt
  • 150g (1/2 cup + 3 tbsp) unsalted butter, cold, cubed

Caramel:

  • 1 (397g/14 ounce) tin carnation caramel (dulce de leche) OR sweetened condensed milk
  • 100g (7 tbsp) unsalted butter
  • 100g (1/2 cup) caster sugar or granulated sugar
  • pinch of salt

Chocolate:

  • 150g (5.3 ounces) dark chocolate (I used a 70%), broken into chunks
  • 50g (1.8 ounces) white chocolate, broken into chunks

Instructions

For the shortbread:

  1. Preheat the oven to 180C fan. Line an 8- or 9-inch square baking tin with a sling of baking paper.
  2. In a large bowl place all of the shortbread ingredients. Rub the butter into the dry ingredients using your fingertips until crumbly. Knead a few times in the bowl to form a cohesive dough.
  3. Crumble up the dough into the lined tin. Use your hands to flatten into an even layer then use the back of a spoon to smooth out.
  4. Bake for 25-30 minutes until golden brown on top.

For the caramel:

  1. Place the caramel (or dulce de leche or sweetened condensed milk) into a medium pot with the butter, sugar and salt.
  2. Heat on medium, stirring often, until the butter has melted. Lower the heat to medium-low and continue to cook, stirring often, for 7-10 minutes until the caramel has thickened and darkened. (NB: if using sweetened condensed milk here, it may be necessary to cook for slightly longer to get it to the right colour. You will also have to watch the caramel more closely & stir more often as it is more likely to catch and burn).
  3. Pour the hot caramel over the baked shortbread and spread out into an even layer (an offset spatula works well but you can also use the back of a spoon). Chill for 10 minutes so the caramel can firm up as you prep the chocolate.

For the chocolate top:

  1. Place the dark chocolate and white chocolate into two separate, heatproof bowls. Place each bowl over a pan of simmering water on the stove, making sure the bottom of the bowl isn't touching the water. Stir occasionally until melted and then remove the bowls from the pans of water.
  2. Pour most of the melted dark chocolate over the cooled caramel. Spread out into an even layer and then rap the whole tray against the work surface a few times to help the chocolate settle into a smooth layer.
  3. Dollops random blobs and swirls of white chocolate over the dark chocolate. Dollop the remaining dark chocolate on top in random spots. Rap the whole tray against the work surface again a few times to help the chocolate settle. Use a toothpick to swirl the dark and white chocolate together to create a marbled pattern.
  4. Chill for 10-20 minutes until set.

Remove from tin & cut:

  1. To remove from the tin you can either use a kitchen blowtorch to briefly warm the edges of the tin (only if the tin is metal!) which will help melt the chocolate and caramel at the very edges so you can lift out the whole thing with the sling. The other method is to dip a butter knife into boiling water, wipe it dry, then run it around the inside edge of the tin to release the chocolate from the edge of the tin.
  2. Cut into 16 squares using a hot knife (warmed either by running a blowtorch over the blade or by dipping the blade into boiling water & wiping dry) making sure you clean the blade between cuts for the neatest edges.
  3. Store cut bars in an airtight container. I recommend keeping them in the fridge (especially if your kitchen is warm!) for up to 1 week. They're delicious cold from the fridge or at room temp.





Have you made this recipe?
I’d love to see how it went! Tag me on instagram @izyhossack and hashtag it #topwithcinnamon so I can have a look & reshare in my stories!

The post Millionaire’s Shortbread – Baking Basics appeared first on Izy Hossack - Top With Cinnamon.

Dirty Lemon

It’s been quite a year for businesses in Paris. From the gilets jaunes movement, to the longest transit strike in French history, then a pandemic, they’ve had to tough a lot of things out. One of the troopers has been Dirty Lemon. After a major remodel of a space that formerly held a LED-lit sushi restaurant, I had a night out with friends – Jennifer,…

It’s been quite a year for businesses in Paris. From the gilets jaunes movement, to the longest transit strike in French history, then a pandemic, they’ve had to tough a lot of things out. One of the troopers has been Dirty Lemon. After a major remodel of a space that formerly held a LED-lit sushi restaurant, I had a night out with friends – Jennifer, Jane, and Forest – at Dirty Lemon, tasting and testing some of the cocktails on their menu. And even better, enjoying the food of cheffe/owner Ruba Khoury.

Ruba’s goal was to create a bar and space that was for everyone, but especially women-friendly, something she said was lacking in Paris. The name comes from a bad experience she had with a funky lemon she was served, and ate (with unfortunate results), at a cocktail bar in the Marais. But Ruba knows her stuff. She worked at such esteemed restaurants in Paris at Septime, Yam’Tcha, and Frenchie before creating the menu at Ibrik, which I loved, that reflected her Palestinean heritage and growing up in multicultural Dubai.

Continue Reading Dirty Lemon...

The Tunnel Cocktail (from Cravan, Paris)

Note: Join me and Franck as he mixes up this Tunnel cocktail today on my IG Apéro Hour, live from…Cravan! Join us at 6pm CET, Noon ET, and 9am PT. Go to my Instagram profile at that time and click on my profile picture when there is a red circle around it, which means we are live. You can also watch us in replay on…

Note: Join me and Franck as he mixes up this Tunnel cocktail today on my IG Apéro Hour, live from…Cravan! Join us at 6pm CET, Noon ET, and 9am PT. Go to my Instagram profile at that time and click on my profile picture when there is a red circle around it, which means we are live. You can also watch us in replay on my IGTV channel. More information about how to tune in, and watch live, as well as in replay, here.

One of my favorite spots in Paris is Cravan. It’s not right in the middle of town, nor is it in the popular St. Germain area, or the trendy 10th or 11th arrondissements. But a few métro stops is all it takes to find yourself at one of the loveliest little outposts in the city.

Continue Reading The Tunnel Cocktail (from Cravan, Paris)...

Drinking French is Out!

I’m excited to announce that Drinking French: The iconic cocktails, apéritifs, and café traditions in France, with 160 recipes is out! My latest book features recipes for the iconic beverages of France, from café specialties hot chocolate, tisanes and infusions, and chilled chocolate frappés, to classic French apéritifs, recipes to make liqueurs, crèmes, wines, punches and cordials at home, as well as French-themed cocktails from…

Drinking French

I’m excited to announce that Drinking French: The iconic cocktails, apéritifs, and café traditions in France, with 160 recipes is out!

My latest book features recipes for the iconic beverages of France, from café specialties hot chocolate, tisanes and infusions, and chilled chocolate frappés, to classic French apéritifs, recipes to make liqueurs, crèmes, wines, punches and cordials at home, as well as French-themed cocktails from my favorite bars in Paris. To make sure you and your guests are properly fed, there’s a whole chapter of Snacks for apéro hour, such as a Terrine facile (an easy-to-make, meaty terrine), savory Cornmeal-Bacon Madeleines, bite-size Mushroom-Roquefort Tartlets, a recipe for Duck Rillettes as well as another for Chicken Rillettes (spread), one being quite rich, and the other for those who want to eat a little lighter. Or those who can’t get duck. (Writing the book, I thought of everything…and everyone.) And there’s a Kale Crespèu, a specialty of Provence which is perfect for summer with glasses of chilled rosé.

Drinking French starts out as a typical French morning does; at a café with a small shot of coffee or a more leisurely wake-up at home with a steaming bowl of Café au lait. Later in the day, people enjoy other café favorites, such as Citron pressé, Lemonade, Fresh Mint Tea, and if it’s the summer, to beat the heat, nothing beats a chilled Chocolate Frappé. For those needing a little more of a boost, there’s a Coffee Frappé, as well as one that uses one of the most popular liqueurs in France (which, interestingly, isn’t French), in case you want something cool and spirited. But there are dozens of recipes that don’t have any alcohol, making Drinking French enjoyable to all.

Continue Reading Drinking French is Out!...

Coconut Peanut Rocky Road

This post was sponsored by Tropical Sun – thank you for supporting this blog! What better way to use up odds and ends of Easter chocolate than to make rocky road!? Such a delicious combo of textures and flavours for an indulgent yet easy dessert. This rocky road has an epic upgrade, though! I mixed in some of Tropical Sun’s coconut peanuts (which are roasted peanuts encased in a crunchy, coconutty shell) for that crispy, crunchy texture and delicious flavour – chocolate-peanut, and chocolate-coconut are ALWAYS winning combos. I love the pop of colour from using coloured chocolates on top, like M&Ms and I also like having a good amount of biscuit mixed in – something plain-ish like a digestive or hobnob as they’re mainly there for the texture. The chocolate gets melted down with a bit of butter and agave syrup to make a softer, slightly fudgy texture. Because of this, I keep the rocky road cubes in the fridge as otherwise they get too soft and melty (although I’m sure they’d be okay in a lunchbox for a few hours).

The post Coconut Peanut Rocky Road appeared first on Izy Hossack – Top With Cinnamon.

a tray of Tropical Sun coconut peanut rocky road

This post was sponsored by Tropical Sun – thank you for supporting this blog!

What better way to use up odds and ends of Easter chocolate than to make rocky road!? Such a delicious combo of textures and flavours for an indulgent yet easy dessert.

coconut peanut rocky road cut up on a board with marshmallows

This rocky road has an epic upgrade, though! I mixed in some of Tropical Sun’s coconut peanuts (which are roasted peanuts encased in a crunchy, coconutty shell) for that crispy, crunchy texture and delicious flavour – chocolate-peanut, and chocolate-coconut are ALWAYS winning combos. I love the pop of colour from using coloured chocolates on top, like M&Ms and I also like having a good amount of biscuit mixed in – something plain-ish like a digestive or hobnob as they’re mainly there for the texture.

The chocolate gets melted down with a bit of butter and agave syrup to make a softer, slightly fudgy texture. Because of this, I keep the rocky road cubes in the fridge as otherwise they get too soft and melty (although I’m sure they’d be okay in a lunchbox for a few hours).

Coconut Peanut Rocky Road

Coconut Peanut Rocky Road

Yield: Serves 30
Prep Time: 10 minutes
Additional Time: 2 hours
Total Time: 2 hours 10 minutes

Ingredients

  • 300g dark chocolate
  • 100g unsalted butter
  • 2 tbsp Tropical Sun agave syrup
  • 150g digestive biscuits
  • 100g Tropical Sun coconut peanuts
  • 100g mini marshmallows
  • 50g chocolate caramels (such as Rolos)

Topping ingredients:

  • Coconut peanuts
  • M&Ms
  • Marshmallows
  • Wafer biscuits

Instructions

  1. Line a 27 x 20 cm (or 20-cm square) baking tin with baking paper. Set aside.
  2. Break the chocolate into chunks and add to a medium pot along with the butter and agave syrup. Melt over a low heat, stirring constantly, until completely smooth. Remove from the heat and allow to cool so that it’s not so hot that it’ll melt the marshmallows.
  3. Roughly break the biscuits onto bite-sized chunks and add to a large bowl along with the coconut peanuts and marshmallows. Pour over the cooled chocolate-butter mixture and stir together until well coated. Add the chocolate caramels and stir through briefly being careful so as not to break the caramels.
  4. Tip the contents of the bowl into the baking tin you prepared earlier. Spread the mixture out with a spatula so that it’s as even as possible. Quickly sprinkle the top of the mixture with a few handfuls of topping ingredients, pressing them down to make sure they adhere to the surface.
  5. Chill for at least 2 hours to make sure the chocolate sets before cutting into 24-30 cubes. Store in a sealed container in the fridge for up to 1 week.

Notes

- This is ideal for using up leftover Christmas and Easter chocolates!

Make it vegan:

  • use vegan dark chocolate and vegan stick butter (/margarine).
  • use vegan marshmallows (buy or make your own)
  • make sure any biscuits/mix ins are vegan friendly (e.g. use oreos instead of digestive biscuits).


Have you made this recipe?
I’d love to see how it went! Tag me on instagram @izyhossack and hashtag it #topwithcinnamon so I can have a look & reshare in my stories!

The post Coconut Peanut Rocky Road appeared first on Izy Hossack - Top With Cinnamon.