How to Boil Chicken—to Put Toward So Many Good Meals

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Which Chicken Cut Works Best?

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A silver plate with parchment paper topped with crispy fried chicken pieces with a small cup of ranch dressing.

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This crispy buttermilk fried chicken recipe is THE BEST thanks to an overnight marinade, a dip in buttermilk, and a special dredging technique. Extra crunchy on the outside, tender and juicy on the inside, you won’t want to put this chicken down! Make a delicious fried chicken sandwich, or use this recipe for fried chicken […]

READ: Buttermilk Fried Chicken

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Rosé Coq Au Vin.

Rosé coq au vin is the star of the show today!! Oh this meal! It is too good to be true. So! My mission for December is to share a bunch of special dinner-worthy meals with you. With the holidays looking the way they are, I know that lots of you will be spending more […]

The post Rosé Coq Au Vin. appeared first on How Sweet Eats.

Rosé coq au vin is the star of the show today!!

rosé coq au vin recipe

Oh this meal! It is too good to be true.

chicken marinating in rosé

So! My mission for December is to share a bunch of special dinner-worthy meals with you. With the holidays looking the way they are, I know that lots of you will be spending more time on your own, in your house, without the fun gatherings that we’re all used to and especially without all the delish holiday food.

While my go-to for Christmas is always a beef tenderloin, I’ve made a few fancy meals for this season that taste so incredible and make dinnertime feel extra special.

These meals take a bit of time and preparation, but I promise it is worth it. 100%. It can be a holiday project that you get to sit down and eat!

chicken browning in pancetta fat

First up?

Coq au vin.

But not just any coq au vin. We’re making with with rosé instead of red wine. 

I KNOW I KNOW! That may sound blasphemous to some of you, but I promise it adds a wonderful light twist. And the sauce is still incredibly rich and decadent and perfect.

Seriously. I want to dip an entire loaf of toasted sourdough in this sauce every time I make it.

rosé coq au vin recipe

While beef bourguignon is a meal I’ve made a million times, coq au vin was more off the radar. I don’t know why! It just wasn’t something I was ever drawn to for us, and I would often make the more decadent beef stew or something like that.

That is… until now.

This chicken dish is unreal. The flavor is superb! I have no other word for it.

rosé coq au vin recipe

Traditional coq au vin has you marinate chicken in wine, and then you cook that marinade down into the most delicious gravy-like sauce. The whole dish also starts with bacon, which adds another layer of flavor.

Like most stews, there are also onions and mushrooms and carrots. Of course, you can edit these vegetables based on what you love. 

One of the parts I love the most? We caramelize pearl onions until golden and sweet and fragrant and add them to the pot. Oh my gosh – it’s like eating a savory candy right in your meal. Absolutely wonderful. 

rosé coq au vin recipe

Even after marinating the chicken, the dish will still take a little over an hour or so to come together. I promise this time is worth it. It’s a meal that I enjoy making – one that brings me back to why I love cooking so much. Usually my days, weeks and months are always so go-go-go, but 2020 changed that. Of course, I still find myself rushing through cooking mostly for the reason that I’m cooking SO much (like every meal, for everyone!) but not this one. 

This is one of those meals that you want to savor making. Every step builds upon each layer of flavor. Each step is important and not one want you want overlook. And those steps make the chicken fall-apart tender, the sauce rich and silky and the vegetables melt in your mouth.

rosé coq au vin recipe

I beg of you: don’t forget the bread! Slices of toasted sourdough are essential here for dipping. Of course, you can make some potatoes or rice or something else if you feel the meal needs more substance. But it’s an indulgent meal, and one that I find is complemented perfectly by golden, buttery sourdough. The toast adds a crunch to each bite and of course – is more than perfectly for dipping and soaking up the remaining sauce. 

rosé coq au vin recipe

Heaven on earth!

rosé coq au vin recipe

Rosé Coq Au Vin

Print

Rosé Coq Au Vin

This rosé coq au vin is a modern twist on the classic dish made with red wine. Instead, we use light rosé for a rich, delicious base.
Course Main Course
Cuisine American
Prep Time 2 hours
Cook Time 1 hour 30 minutes
Total Time 3 hours 30 minutes
Servings 4 people
Author How Sweet Eats

Ingredients

  • 2 pounds bone-in chicken thighs and legs
  • kosher salt and pepper
  • 3 cups rosé wine
  • 1 cup chicken stock
  • 4 sprigs fresh thyme
  • 4 ounces diced pancetta
  • 2 tablespoons butter
  • 1 large sweet onion, diced
  • 4 garlic cloves, minced
  • 2 large carrots, cut into 1-inch rounds
  • 12 ounces cremini mushrooms
  • 1 teaspoon tomato paste
  • 1 tablespoon all-purpose flour
  • 2 tablespoons brandy
  • 12 ounces pearl onions, peeled
  • 2 tablespoons unsalted butter
  • 1 teaspoon sugar
  • ¼ teaspoon salt
  • 1 loaf of sourdough bread, sliced (or 6 to 8 slices)
  • 3 tablespoons chopped fresh parsley

Instructions

  • Season the chicken all over generously with salt and pepper. Place the chicken in a large bowl. Cover it with the wine and chicken stock. Add the fresh thyme into the bowl. Cover and refrigerate. Marinate for at least 2 hours, or overnight.
  • When you’re ready to make the dish, heat the pancetta in a large pot or dutch oven over medium heat. Cook until crispy and the fat is rendered, about 10 minutes. Remove the pancetta with a slotted spoon and place it on a paper towel to drain excess grease.
  • Remove the chicken from the wine (keep the wine marinade!) and pat the chicken completely dry. Add the chicken to the same pot with the fat from the pancetta and sear on all sides. You may need to do this in batches! Sear for about 3 to 4 minutes total, just until all sides are deeply golden. Remove the chicken and place it on a plate.
  • With the heat over medium-low, add the 2 tablespoons of butter. Stir in the onions, carrots and garlic with a pinch of salt and pepper. Cook until softened, about 5 minutes. Stir in the mushrooms. Cook until those soften, another 5 to 6 minutes. Stir in the tomato paste and cook for 2 minutes. Stir in the flour and cook for 2 minutes more.
  • Deglaze the pan with the brandy, adding it and stirring, cooking for 1 to 2 minutes. Stir in the remaining wine marinade from the chicken. Bring the mixture to a boil. Cook, stirring often, until the mixture reduces by half, about 10 to 12 minutes.
  • Add the chicken and the pancetta back to the pot. Reduce the heat to low, just so it’s barely simmering. Cover the pot and cook for 45 to 60 minutes, turning the chicken halfway through. Taste and season with more salt and pepper if necessary.
  • When the dish is almost finished, heat the 1 tablespoon of butter in a skillet. Once melted, stir in the pearl onions with the sugar and salt. Cook, stirring often, until the onions are caramelly, about 10 minutes. Remove the onions from the skillet and add them to the pot with the chicken.
  • In the same skillet where you cooked the onions, add the sourdough slices and toast them. If needed, you can add in another tablespoon or so of butter - or just butter the bread and toast it until golden.
  • Sprinkle the chicken dish with the chopped parsley. Serve the chicken with the sauce and vegetables, along with the bread for dipping.

Notes

adapted from ny times

This is last meal worthy.

The post Rosé Coq Au Vin. appeared first on How Sweet Eats.

Spicy chicken ramen

Aromatic & Spicy Perfect Chicken Ramen

The tendency to cook Asian dishes becomes more and more popular among various groups of people worldwide. Authentic Japanese, Chinese, and Korean restaurants and bars are great ideas for start-ups: they are incredibly fashionable, unique, but pricey. Why not try to cook spicy chicken ramen at home? It will take around two-three hours, and the results will be delightful for you and your beloved ones. Learn how to make spicy ramen; it’s possible for all cooking levels!

A quick guide to the recipe:

  1. Ramen: fun facts
  2. How much does ramen cost?
  3. Ramen Vs. Aspirin
  4. The etiquette of eating ramen
  5. Ramen calories
  6. How to reheat ramen?
  7. What is tan-tan ramen?
  8. How to prepare bok choy for ramen?
  9. The path to the marvelous ramen
  10. Spicy chicken ramen: about main & additional ingredients
  11. Cooking process: preparing broth, marinating eggs

1. Ramen: fun facts

The origin of ramen is one of the issues that interest a vast majority of people. So, where is ramen from? To be honest, ramen’s history is super complicated, and no one certainly knows where it originated. The debate is still going on if it is a Chinese or Japanese dish. The reason for that is noodles were called ‘Chuka soba,’ which is a Chinese term. However, Japanese people adopted it and gave their name – ‘ramen.’ It is up to you to decide to which cuisine the ramen belongs.

As you know, Asian languages are super hard to learn and to understand. So, how do you pronounce ramen noodles? The only correct way to pronounce ramen is ‘rah-men.’ No other way is possible in the world of the Japanese language!

2. How much does ramen cost?

The price of the ramen is directly connected with the quality of its ingredients and the chef. The dish varies in price around the globe. For example, the cheapest spicy chicken ramen is $3, whereas the most expensive one is $400. Serve the most expensive ramen in a Sydney restaurant Gumshara. The broth is made from lobster heads and pork bones. Topped with a full tempura lobster and a golden lobster head. Of course, there are noodles, soft egg, bamboo shoots, green onions and nori.

The most expensive ramen in Tokyo costs $ 120 in Noodle Stand Tokyo, topped with 300 grams of Japanese wagyu, truffle oil, and gold flakes! I would love to try it!

3. Ramen Vs. Aspirin

Surprisingly, spicy chicken ramen noodles can cure the most severe hangover you can suffer from fun nights out with friends. The secret is that this spice mixture includes sodium, which recovers the salts you may lose due to dehydration. Ramen hangover is better and more delicious than aspirin for sure!

4. The etiquette of eating ramen

How to eat ramen? How to eat ramen with chopsticks? How to eat ramen noodles? These are the most asked questions by people who see the dish for the first time in their life! According to the etiquette standards, you should eat ramen as fast as possible. In Japanese culture, slurping is more than welcomed; it means the food is delicious and perfect! The only cutlery you should use are chopsticks and a soup spoon: just gather some noodles with chopsticks and put the spoon under the noodles to collect the rest.

5. Ramen calories

How many calories in ramen? Well, it depends on which type of ramen you are eating. Ramen is a high-calorie dish. 100 grams of ramen usually has about 400-470 kcal.

The other question is how many calories in ramen noodles? 100 grams of ramen noodles have about 450 kcal. From the dish, you should be full enough for an extended time.

How many carbs in ramen noodles? 100 grams of dry ramen noodles contains 60 grams of carbs, 15 grams of fat and 10 grams of protein.

6. How to reheat ramen?

One of the specifications of ramen is that you need it as soon as it is served. What if you are in a situation where you have to reheat Picante chicken ramen, and there is no other option? No worries, we have a solution to this issue! You should strain the broth and reheat it on the stove or in the microwave and refill all of the ingredients. It is most likely for the noodles to absorb a decent portion of the broth. Therefore, you can dilute the broth with water and add soy sauce.

The other essential thing to know is how long does ramen last. It’s only about broth, right? The finished ramen cannot be stored. The broth must be filtered and stored for up to 4-5 days. The other option is to freeze the broth, then it is perfectly stored for several months.

7. What is tan-tan ramen?

Tan-tan ramen comes from the Japanese word ‘tantanmen,’ which is a Dan Dan noodle version. Such noodles are served with spicy chili flavored soup, not hot chicken ramen. The soup can be filled with miso pork mince or just with chili species.

8. How to prepare bok choy for ramen?

It is super easy to prepare the bok choy for ramen! It is an excellent ingredient for hot chicken flavor ramen, as it adds more taste! Cut lengthwise into 2-4 pieces and rinses. Place in boiling water and cook for 3 minutes. Bok choy should remain crispy.

9. The path to the marvelous ramen

I have tried many ramen recipes and have spent many years trying to develop the perfect recipe and taste for me. This is a great broth flavor that I have achieved after plenty of efforts to create ramen. To balance the taste, it would be good to pour in mirin. This will add sweetness and a little sourness. If you do not have mirin, add a spoonful of sugar and rice vinegar. One chef has revealed the recipe for his perfect ramen, the taste of which I could not guess. It was lemongrass: it’s lovely, try it! Just go fresh or frozen. Not dried!

All the photos of ramens below are mine. And you can see how many filing options you can make. I have signed all photos for convenience .

10. So, spicy chicken ramen: about main & additional ingredients

EGGS. If you are lazy, you do not need to pickle them.

MEAT or SHRIMPS.​ I love it with chicken or shrimps. I cut out the bones from the chicken thighs and cook the broth from them (along with the wings). I bake the thighs with the skin just before serving and put them in the finished ramen. Nevertheless, you can cook all the meat in the broth at once. You can serve shrimp ramen as well. To do this, cook ramen on chicken broth. Peel the shrimps separately and boil them until they are ready and tender.

NOODLES. ​Egg or wheat noodles. I hate ramen with flat noodles; round noodles are much better. In the worst-case scenario, you can replace it with rice noodles. If there’s nothing at all at your home, you can even take Barilla spaghetti.
WHAT ELSE?​ Fresh spinach leaves or bok choy. If spinach, then it should be fleshy. But choose a young and small bok choy. Cilantro, green onions, and chili are desirable to add. Additional ingredients:

MISO PASTE. I don’t like miso ramen, but if you do, add a spoonful of good (preferably light) miso paste at the very beginning of cooking before the broth boils.

KIMCHI. It won’t hurt to add some delicious kimchi. If you manage to get a high-quality one, cut and serve quite a bit separately so that everyone can add it to the broth (if they want)

SOY SPROUTS. It adds freshness to ramen. Add them quite a bit on top. Serve with nori slices or ready-made chips. Some people like to add corn kernels. I love corn very much, but I think that it is inappropriate here and adds extra sweetness. Edamame beans, on the other hand, are excellent.

So, the recipe. Let’s start cooking!


 11. Cooking process: preparing broth, marinating eggs

 

SPICY CHICKEN RAMEN

spice chicken Ramen with bok choy, noodles and pickled egg recipe

Main ingredients (seves 4)

For broth:

4 liters of water

3 wings + 4 chicken thighs

1 fresh lemongrass stem

1 tsp of dry dashi stock

6 – 7 cm of a ginger root

5 cloves of garlic

1.5 tsp Chinese mix “5 spices”

3 tbsp of soy sauce

2 tbsp of Worcester sauce

2 tbsp of fish sauce

2 tbsp of oyster sauce

2 tbsp of good quality sauce ‘Sweet chili.’

2 tbsp of dried wakame seaweed

2 nori sheets

3 tbsp of mirin or (1 tbsp of rice vinegar + 1 tsp of sugar or honey)

For serving:

160 g of dry round wheat or egg noodles

4 eggs

6 chopped nori leaves (≈5×5 cm )

Spinach or bok choy (4 spinach leaves or 1⁄2 bok choy per serving)

2 tbsp of cilantro leaves

2 tbsp of chopped green onions

Fresh chili

2 tsp of sesame

Marinade for eggs:

4 cm of a ginger root

2 cloves of garlic

2 tsp of dark soy sauce (optional, it just stains the egg very quickly)

4 tbsp of soy sauce

2 tbsp of mirin (or 1 tbsp of rice vinegar + 1 tsp honey or sugar)

4 tbsp of water

Main guidelines:

Broth:

1. Cut out the bones from the thighs. Set aside the meat. Cut the wings into 2 pieces at the joint.

2. In a saucepan with a thick bottom, pour 1-2 tbsp of cooking oil and lay the wings and bones. Fry quickly. Let the meat turn golden; this will give the broth additional flavor and aroma. Pour in some water to cover the meat and scrape off with a spatula anything that is stuck to the bottom.

3. Peel the garlic and crush lightly, wash the ginger and cut into slices in the peel. Crush the lemongrass with the flat side of a knife and cut lengthwise into 2 pieces.

4. Add the 5 spice mixture to lemongrass, ginger, and garlic. Pour in 3.5 – 4 liters of cold water until it boils. Keep it on a low heat so that the broth does not boil.

5. Heat 1 tbsp of cooking oil on a pan. Chop the nori leaf and fry with the wakame in a pan, stirring for about 30 seconds. This will reveal their taste. Gently, the algae begin to burn quickly.

6. When the broth boils, add Worcestershire, Soy, and Oyster sauces, wakame, and nori. Cook for 2 hours. Try the broth; it should be slightly salty.

Now is the time to pickle eggs.

7. Return to broth after 2 hours. Add sweet chili, fish sauce, and mirin to it. Cook for another 20-25 minutes.

Marinate eggs:

1. To prevent the egg from cracking, before throwing it into boiling water, it must either be heated to room temperature or pierced with the tip of a knife. It’s not scary! Just place the egg on the surface with a towel or napkin, take a small knife and pierce with the tip of the knife until it clicks.

2. Place eggs in boiling water and cook for 7 minutes. Clean up.

3. Prepare the marinade. Grate ginger, chop garlic. Place in a small saucepan, cover with light soy sauce, and heat to almost boil. Remove from heat, add remaining ingredients, and pour over eggs. Leave on for at least 2 hours. During this time, prepare the rest of the ingredients.

Chicken:

Start cooking the chicken thighs for serving 30-40 minutes before the broth is ready.

1. Preheat the oven (230 °C, I usually use the Grill setting at full power).

2. Salt chicken thighs sprinkle with vegetable oil. Place skin side down into the oven-tray. Bake for 15 minutes, turn over and keep in the oven until they are golden brown (15-20 minutes).

3. Sprinkle with sesame seeds 3 minutes before they are ready. Alternatively, you can simply fry the thighs in a skillet or grill until they are tender.

Noodles:

Place the noodles in boiling water and cook as directed on the package. Rinse with water and place on plates.

Bok choy or Spinach:

If you are using spinach, sort out the leaves, rinse well with water to remove the sand, cut off the stems.

As for bok choy, cut it lengthwise into 2 parts if it is enormous by 4. Rinse well to get rid of any dirt between the leaves. Place in boiling water for 3 minutes. Transfer to a plate.

Greens:

Pour cold water over the cilantro leaves. They will absorb water and become fresher and juicier. Slice green onions diagonally and slice chili thinly.

Putting ramen all together

1. Strain the broth, remove the meat from the bones, and place on plates. Keep the broth simmering over the small fire.

2. Place chopped and baked thighs on top.

3. Divide the noodles, spinach, or bok choy into bowls. Pour in broth. Pour gently over the noodles. Add halved eggs, cilantro leaves, green onions, and chili. Serve immediately!

Bon Appetit!


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What to Cook This Week?

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A Big Little Recipe has the smallest-possible ingredient list and big everything else: flavor, creativity, wow factor. That means five ingredients or fewer—not including water, salt, black pepper, and certain fats (like oil and butter), since we’re gue…

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I’ll just come out and say it: I will never tire of sheet-pan dinners. It would be hard to put a number on the times I’ve assembled some combination of protein, vegetables, or starch on a sheet pan, slid it into a hot oven, and then served dinner 30 minutes or so later—straight from the pan.

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