Out of Baking Powder? Here Are the 3 Best Substitutes.

Baking powder has always struck me as quite magical. Typically used in tandem with basic baking soda, a teeny, tiny teaspoon of acidic baking powder can leaven an army of cookies, a trio of cake layers, or stack of pillowy tortillas alike.
But while t…

Baking powder has always struck me as quite magical. Typically used in tandem with basic baking soda, a teeny, tiny teaspoon of acidic baking powder can leaven an army of cookies, a trio of cake layers, or stack of pillowy tortillas alike.

But while they look similarly and often work side-by-side, baking powder and baking soda are not to be used interchangeably. Because baking soda relies on a certain amount of acid to be present to leaven a baked good, swapping baking soda for baking powder will yield a batter that’s improperly risen and overly basic (metallic-tasting). But before you run to the store, consider one of these three substitutes, all made from pantry staples.

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What are the Best Substitutes for Vegetable Oil?

Vegetable oil is a product, yes, but it’s also a category. Grapeseed, avocado, safflower, peanut, and coconut oils are all considered vegetable oils. A bottle of vegetable oil, then, is a proprietor’s blend (of mostly soybean oil); it’s typically flav…

Vegetable oil is a product, yes, but it’s also a category. Grapeseed, avocado, safflower, peanut, and coconut oils are all considered vegetable oils. A bottle of vegetable oil, then, is a proprietor’s blend (of mostly soybean oil); it's typically flavorless, scentless, colorless, and with a decently high smoke point for high-heat cooking. (As a reminder: “smoke point” refers to the temperature at which oil starts to burn and emit smoke.)

If vegetable oil’s purpose is simply to conduct heat quickly and efficiently, without imparting much flavor in the process, why reach for a more expensive variety? As author of The Big Book of Healthy Cooking Oils Lisa Howard told TIME Magazine, cheap “vegetable oil is guaranteed to be highly processed."

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How to Make Our Most Popular Recipes With Whatever’s on Hand

Now more than ever, home is where many of us are seeking refuge and solace in light of the novel coronavirus. This is a tough time, but we’re here for you—whether it’s a new pantry recipe or a useful tip for your kitchen, here are some ideas to make th…

Now more than ever, home is where many of us are seeking refuge and solace in light of the novel coronavirus. This is a tough time, but we’re here for you—whether it’s a new pantry recipe or a useful tip for your kitchen, here are some ideas to make things run a little more smoothly for you and your loved ones.


These days, there are few recipes whose ingredient lists I have entirely in stock. But that hasn’t stopped me from cooking and baking. The truth is: Just about any recipe can withstand a substitution or three—even our most popular ones from the last decade. Will an adaptation turn out exactly like the original? Nope. Will you feel a small (but mighty!) sense of accomplishment for making it work? You bet. Below, we’ll cover smart swaps for each recipe, so you can off-road your dinner—or midnight snack—without ever leaving your kitchen.

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Yes, You Can Substitute Lemon Zest in a Recipe. Here’s How.

The rind, or peel, of a lemon consists of two layers—the yellow zest (or the flavedo), and the white pith (albedo). The zest—where you’ll find all of the fruit’s aromatic oils—lends lemony fragrance to anything it graces, without the pucker.
Finding a…

The rind, or peel, of a lemon consists of two layers—the yellow zest (or the flavedo), and the white pith (albedo). The zest—where you’ll find all of the fruit’s aromatic oils—lends lemony fragrance to anything it graces, without the pucker.

Finding a suitable substitute for lemon zest in recipes can be tricky, but not impossible. Lemon oil, made from nothing but cold-pressed lemon rinds, is probably the most accurate substitute, taste-wise; but, if you’re unable to source a lemon, it’s probably also unlikely you have a stash of lemon oil. Here are some tips on how to utilize non-lemon lemon substitutes, to zesty effect.

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12 Ideas for Leftover Prime Rib (Other Than, You Know, Just Eating It)

So you did the thing. To the delight of your family and friends, you herb-rubbed, temped, roasted, temped again, carved, and served up a prime rib. But now, you’ve found yourself with a bit of a (tasty) problem: What to do with all the leftovers?

We’v…

So you did the thing. To the delight of your family and friends, you herb-rubbed, temped, roasted, temped again, carved, and served up a prime rib. But now, you've found yourself with a bit of a (tasty) problem: What to do with all the leftovers?

We’ve got you covered. From tacos to phở, here are 12 ways to keep the good prime rib times going.

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