8 Top Recipe Ideas to use Sourdough Discard

From inventive desserts like sourdough brownies and (vegan) banana bread, through to classic (and delicious) recipes like sourdough bagels and waffles, there are discard recipes for all sorts of occasions. Sourdough Banana Bread (Vegan) This recipe uses up 150g (3/4 cup) of discard, is super moist and is vegan (eggless!) too. You can even use buckwheat flour or rye flour in the recipe so it’s flexible to suit your pantry. It can even be baked as banana muffins. Sourdough Brownies A classic dessert of brownies, revamped with the addition of 120g (just over 1/2 cup) of sourdough starter so they need no additional flour at all. These babies are fudgy yet light with that crisp meringue-like topping. They’ll soon become a favourite! Sourdough Crumpets (Vegan) A simple way to use up that discard, only needing discard, flour, baking soda and some sugar (so the recipe is easy to scale up/down using what you have on hand) – these are a classic British breakfast food/snack. They’re cooked on the stove top in a pan using metal rings – if you don’t have Chef’s rings for making them, metal cookie cutters or even a rinsed out tuna can will work. How to […]

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From inventive desserts like sourdough brownies and (vegan) banana bread, through to classic (and delicious) recipes like sourdough bagels and waffles, there are discard recipes for all sorts of occasions.

Sourdough Banana Bread (Vegan)

This recipe uses up 150g (3/4 cup) of discard, is super moist and is vegan (eggless!) too. You can even use buckwheat flour or rye flour in the recipe so it’s flexible to suit your pantry. It can even be baked as banana muffins.

Sourdough Brownies

Sourdough Brownies

A classic dessert of brownies, revamped with the addition of 120g (just over 1/2 cup) of sourdough starter so they need no additional flour at all. These babies are fudgy yet light with that crisp meringue-like topping. They’ll soon become a favourite!

Sourdough Crumpets - how to make sourdough crumpets by Izy Hossack

Sourdough Crumpets (Vegan)

A simple way to use up that discard, only needing discard, flour, baking soda and some sugar (so the recipe is easy to scale up/down using what you have on hand) – these are a classic British breakfast food/snack. They’re cooked on the stove top in a pan using metal rings – if you don’t have Chef’s rings for making them, metal cookie cutters or even a rinsed out tuna can will work.

How to make Wholemeal Sourdough Bread (Step-by-Step GIF guide) (Vegan)

The most obvious of them all, bake a lovely sourdough loaf! I’ve broken down my simple method of making a wholemeal sourdough loaf here, with step by step GIFs and images to make it as simple as possible. You’ll be on your way to a tall, beautiful loaf in no time!

Crispy Sourdough Waffles

An overnight fermented batter which produces light and crispy waffles, full of that sourdough flavour! An excellent addition to your at-home brunch spread.

Sourdough Hot Cross Buns (Vegan)

An absolute *must* when it comes to Easter baking! These buns are enriched with a tangzhong paste to make them fluffy without needing eggs. They’re full of mixed spice and studded with mixed dried fruit for that authentic flavour.

Sourdough Wholemeal Bagels (Vegan)

Chewy, tangy and moreish! These sourdough bagels are such a great thing to make with your discard. They’re not too hard to make and freeze very well (halve them before freezing for easy toasting).

A cinnamon swirled sourdough loaf with a mug of tea on a chopping board

Sourdough Cinnamon & Date Swirl Bread

An updated version of the classic cinnamon-raisin swirl bread. This sourdough version is super light, fluffy with a bit of tang, studded with dates instead of raisins for a more caramel-like flavour. The recipe incorporates dry yeast as well to speed things up but you can go full on sourdough if you have more time on your hands.

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American Buttermilk Pancakes

Fluffy, easy and so classic! A delicious buttermilk pancake recipe for breakfast/brunch or even dessert. I realised that out of all the pancake recipes on my site, I haven’t done a plain + simple, American style pancake recipe. If you’ve been reading my blog for a while now, you’ll probably know that I am a little bit obsessed with pancakes. I grew up eating Aunt Jemima’s pancake mix pancakes which my mum would bring back from America when she’d go over to visit relatives. When I started cooking for myself, pancakes were something that I started trying to make from scratch so I could eat them more often. After many years now of pancake-making, I’ve picked up tips along the way as well as learnt my own best practices for the perfect texture. A few things I’ll note below.. My top pancake-making tips: Adding some malted milk powder to the batter: I can’t remember where I read this but I love this little addition. I add malted milk powder instead of sugar (as it’s usually sweetened) and it adds such a delicious flavour to the pancakes. It’s optional as I know loads of people won’t have it to hand, plus […]

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a tray of American style buttermilk pancakes with butter  & maple syrup

Fluffy, easy and so classic! A delicious buttermilk pancake recipe for breakfast/brunch or even dessert.

I realised that out of all the pancake recipes on my site, I haven’t done a plain + simple, American style pancake recipe. If you’ve been reading my blog for a while now, you’ll probably know that I am a little bit obsessed with pancakes. I grew up eating Aunt Jemima’s pancake mix pancakes which my mum would bring back from America when she’d go over to visit relatives. When I started cooking for myself, pancakes were something that I started trying to make from scratch so I could eat them more often.

a plate of buttermilk pancakes with butter and maple syrup

After many years now of pancake-making, I’ve picked up tips along the way as well as learnt my own best practices for the perfect texture. A few things I’ll note below..

My top pancake-making tips:

  1. Adding some malted milk powder to the batter: I can’t remember where I read this but I love this little addition. I add malted milk powder instead of sugar (as it’s usually sweetened) and it adds such a delicious flavour to the pancakes. It’s optional as I know loads of people won’t have it to hand, plus it’s only just there for the taste.
  2. Using a mixture of plain yoghurt and water to make ‘buttermilk’: we *can* get buttermilk in the UK but it is harder to find and I find it has more limited uses than yoghurt does. I eat yoghurt in many different meals/recipes so (a) I usually have it in the fridge and (b) it’s more likely that I’ll use it all up. Thinning the yoghurt out with some water helps bring it closer to buttermilk texture. The acidity, protein and fat content of the yoghurt is close to that of buttermilk so works in a pretty similar way to buttermilk. That said, if you have buttermilk and want to use it, go for it! I just tend to do the yoghurt trick instead.
  3. Separating the eggs (but not whipping the whites): a lot of fluffy pancake recipes require you to whip egg whites and fold them into the batter which does definitely help make a super light pancake. However, the majority of the time I don’t want to do this step! I would rather have a less fluffy pancake than have to clean my electric whisk. I picked up this tip of mixing in the yolks and whites separately from this pancake recipe on The Kitchn. It does seem to help make the pancakes a bit fluffier and is so easy to do.
  4. Cooking the pancakes on a low heat: I find this ends up helping you get the right level of browning on the pancake whilst also making sure the batter in the centre is cooked.
  5. Reheating pancakes for a crowd: If you’re serving the whole batch of pancakes to a bunch of people at once, I’d recommend making them and then transferring to a baking tray. Once they’re all made, you can pop the tray into the oven at around 100C (200F) for 10 minutes to warm them back up. You can keep a tray in the oven and keep adding to it as you’re cooking the pancakes but sometimes this can mean that you first pancakes end up sitting in the oven for 30 minutes and get really dry.
  6. Reheating pancakes for 1 to 2 people: just do this straight in the frying pan! You can brush the pan with a bit of oil first and then add the cooked pancakes to the pan over a high heat on the stove. Flip them over once the underside is hot and let the other side warm up too. This is the best way to preserve their texture plus it’s very quick when you’re only doing it for a few pancakes. I sometimes reheat pancakes in my toaster when I’m feeling extra lazy, but I find that a lot of the time they end up crumpling, getting stuck in the toaster and subsequently burning.

What should the thickness of American pancake batter be?

If you’re only used to making crepes/English pancakes, making American-style pancakes can seem like a whole other world. I tend to think that thicker batter helps the pancakes rise more and be fluffier in the end and you can try this out yourself: hold back some of the liquid (around 50ml?) when making your batter, mix the ingredients together and see what the texture is like. Maybe even make a test pancake with it! Then, if needed, you can always add more liquid to loosen it up. It’s easier to adjust a batter that’s too thick than try to fix a batter that’s too thin.

You want the texture of the batter to be pourable so it’ll spread out a bit once in the pan, yet definitely thicker than crepe batter. Almost like a thick-ish cheese sauce texture, if that makes sense.

fluffy American pancakes on a tray

Other pancake recipes:

American Buttermilk Pancakes

American Buttermilk Pancakes

Yield: serves 2-4
Prep Time: 10 minutes
Cook Time: 10 minutes
Total Time: 20 minutes

Ingredients

  • 150g (1 1/4 cups) plain white (all-purpose) flour
  • 2 tbsp malted milk powder e.g. Horlicks (optional - see notes)
  • 1 1/2 tsp baking powder
  • 1/2 tsp bicarbonate of soda (baking soda)
  • 1/4 tsp fine table salt
  • 250g (1 cup) natural plain yoghurt
  • 80g (1/3 cup) water
  • 25g (2 tbsp) light olive oil/vegetable oil OR unsalted butter, melted
  • 2 medium UK eggs (large US eggs), separated
  • vegetable oil for the frying pan

Instructions

  1. Combine the flour, malted milk powder (if using), baking powder, bicarbonate of soda and salt in a medium bowl. Mix well to combine and remove any lumps.
  2. Add the yoghurt, water and oil/melted butter to the bowl of dry ingredients. Add the yolks in too and stir until the mixture is mostly combined with a few floury patches left. Once you're at this stage, add the egg whites to the bowl and then stir until fully combined but being mindful of your mixing (overmixing will produce a dense pancake).
  3. Set a large, non-stick frying pan on the stove over a medium heat. Add some vegetable oil to the pan, you only need a thin layer to coat the pan with - I like to use a heatproof pastry brush to spread it out over the whole surface but you can just tilt and swirl the pan to achieve this.
  4. Scoop up a few tablespoons of batter (I like using a 50ml mechanical ice cream scoop for this) and dollop into the pan to form one pancake. Repeat to form 2 to 4 pancakes in your pan (depending on the size of your pan), making sure you leave room around each pancake for it to spread and puff.
  5. Turn the heat down to low and leave to cook until the underside of each pancake is golden and the edges of the batter on top starts to look dry. Use a metal spatula to flip the pancake over and let it cook until golden on the other side. Remove to a baking tray and repeat the cooking of the rest of the batter as before, adding more oil to the pan as needed between batches.
  6. I like to warm up my tray of pancakes in the oven (at around 100°C/200°F) after I've cooked all of the batter.
  7. Serve warm with butter & maple syrup.

Notes

- If you don't have malted milk powder: replace with 1 tbsp of granulated sugar and an extra 1 tbsp of plain white flour

- A note on buttermilk: I use a mixture of natural yoghurt (which is looser than Greek yoghurt) and water to mimic buttermilk since it is hard to find in the UK. If you can get buttermilk, use 330g (1 1/3 cups) of buttermilk instead of the yoghurt and water.

Have you made this recipe?
I’d love to see how it went! Tag me on instagram @izyhossack and hashtag it #topwithcinnamon so I can have a look & reshare in my stories!

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Pumpkin Spice Waffles

Crispy, warmly spiced and golden-hued waffles for the spooky season! Gotta get as much pumpkin spice into your mouth hole before everyone starts talking about Christmas, right? As the batter is flavourful for these crispy pumpkin waffles, I prefer minimal toppings. A bit of maple syrup, some pecans, maaaaybe a bit of yogurt. But really just salty butter + syrup are perfect on here. I first made these waffles at an event that Rachel Khoo hosted last year to celebrate the launch of her book, the Little Swedish Kitchen. We used butternut squash puree on the day but here I’ve used canned pumpkin puree to make life easier. If you happen to have some roasted or steamed squash (or even sweet potato/ carrot) you can blend that up into a homemade puree and use in the recipe below. I’ve tweaked the recipe slightly from Rachel’s by using vegetable oil instead of butter (just so I have one less dirty dish), using slightly more yoghurt instead of buttermilk. Of course I also added pumpkin spice to the batter for that extreeeeme Autumnal flavour. I know it’s impossible to get pumpkin spice mix in the UK so I’ve got suggestions at the […]

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a plate with a pumpkin spice waffle and yoghurt and pecans on top

Crispy, warmly spiced and golden-hued waffles for the spooky season! Gotta get as much pumpkin spice into your mouth hole before everyone starts talking about Christmas, right?

As the batter is flavourful for these crispy pumpkin waffles, I prefer minimal toppings. A bit of maple syrup, some pecans, maaaaybe a bit of yogurt. But really just salty butter + syrup are perfect on here.

I first made these waffles at an event that Rachel Khoo hosted last year to celebrate the launch of her book, the Little Swedish Kitchen. We used butternut squash puree on the day but here I’ve used canned pumpkin puree to make life easier. If you happen to have some roasted or steamed squash (or even sweet potato/ carrot) you can blend that up into a homemade puree and use in the recipe below.

pumpkin spice waffles overhead on a table with maple syrup and pecans

I’ve tweaked the recipe slightly from Rachel’s by using vegetable oil instead of butter (just so I have one less dirty dish), using slightly more yoghurt instead of buttermilk. Of course I also added pumpkin spice to the batter for that extreeeeme Autumnal flavour. I know it’s impossible to get pumpkin spice mix in the UK so I’ve got suggestions at the bottom of the recipe for a substitute (plus a DIY version).

Other Pumpkin Spice Goodness:
Pumpkin Spice Pour-Over Coffee
Salted Caramel Pumpkin Spice Cake
Pumpkin Spice Baked Doughnuts

a plate with a pumpkin spice waffle and yoghurt and pecans on top

Pumpkin Spice Waffles

Pumpkin Spice Waffles

Yield: makes 8 waffles

Ingredients

  • 300g (1 1/4 cups) pumpkin puree
  • 60g (1/4 cup) vegetable oil or melted butter
  • 250g (1 cup) plain yoghurt
  • 150g (2/3 cup) milk
  • 2 medium UK eggs (large US eggs)
  • 1/2 tsp fine table salt
  • 2 tsp pumpkin spice mix (see notes)
  • 200g (1 2/3 cups) wholemeal (wholewheat) pastry flour (see notes)
  • 2 tsp baking powder

Instructions

  1. In a large bowl, combine the pumpkin puree, vegetable oil, yoghurt, milk, eggs, salt and pumpkin spice mix. Stir until smooth. Add the flour and baking powder and fold together until just combined.
  2. Preheat your waffle iron. Brush with a bit of vegetable oil and scoop in some of the batter (usually 1/3 cup/80ml is right for my waffle iron). Cook according to the manufacturers instructions - for me, this batter takes 4-5 minutes to cook through. Repeat until all the waffle batter has been used up.
  3. Keep waffles warm on a baking tray in a low oven, until you're ready to serve them. Serve warm with salty butter and a drizzle of maple syrup

Notes

1. Recipe very slightly adapted from Rachel Khoo

2. Pumpkin Spice Mix:

- if you're in the UK it's hard to find pumpkin spice mix. You can use 'mixed spice' which is pretty similar or make your own spice blend by following this recipe: 1/2 tsp ground cloves,  1/2 tsp ground allspice,  1 tsp freshly grated nutmeg,  1 tbsp ground ginger,  3 tbsp ground cinnamon. Store in a lidded jar, using as needed.

3. You can use plain (all purpose) flour in the batter if you don't have wholemeal.

Have you made this recipe?
I’d love to see how it went! Tag me on instagram @izyhossack and hashtag it #topwithcinnamon so I can have a look & reshare in my stories!

The post Pumpkin Spice Waffles appeared first on Izy Hossack - Top With Cinnamon.