How to Make Long-Lasting Whipped Cream

Don’t weep, whipped cream, it’s all going to be alright. Sure, you have a tendency to lose your spine as you sit out for a while (you fall, you run, and, no offense, you become a little unappetizing), but we’re about to fix that.

Chin up! There are lo…

Don't weep, whipped cream, it's all going to be alright. Sure, you have a tendency to lose your spine as you sit out for a while (you fall, you run, and, no offense, you become a little unappetizing), but we're about to fix that.

Chin up! There are lots of ways to make longer-lasting, more stable whipped cream that won't have a breakdown as it graces chocolate cake, strawberry ice, rhubarb buckle, or a pile of vegetables (yes, you read that right). That means more opportunity to prep in advance and less of an urge to rush through dinner to get to that cream-topped lemon custard pie (though, let's be real, I do that no matter what).

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How to Keep Your Scrambled Eggs From Getting Rubbery

We’ve teamed up with Eggland’s Best to share egg-cooking mistakes we’ve probably all made before—plus, what to do instead so a good egg never goes to waste again. Speaking of good eggs, we’re fans of Eggland’s Best Classic Eggs. These farm-fresh eggs n…

We’ve teamed up with Eggland’s Best to share egg-cooking mistakes we’ve probably all made before—plus, what to do instead so a good egg never goes to waste again. Speaking of good eggs, we’re fans of Eggland’s Best Classic Eggs. These farm-fresh eggs not only taste great, but are an excellent source of vitamins E, D, B2, B5, and B12, as well as lutein and omega-3 fatty acids. Even better, they stay fresher for longer compared to ordinary eggs, making them one of our go-to fridge staples.


Eggs were one of the first things I ever learned to cook, and they’ve been a go-to staple ever since—for a quick breakfast, baked good, custardy dessert, appetizer, and more. Though making eggs may seem like an easy task, there's been more than one occasion where I’ve accidentally let a perfectly good egg end up in the trash can.

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The Right Way to Store Cucumbers (So They Don’t Turn to Mush)

Cucumbers are easy to find year-round, but they’re really at their peak come summer (May through August). Once you get home from stocking up on them at the farm stand or even just the grocery store, it’s important to know how to store cucumbers. If you…

Cucumbers are easy to find year-round, but they’re really at their peak come summer (May through August). Once you get home from stocking up on them at the farm stand or even just the grocery store, it’s important to know how to store cucumbers. If you take care of these green gems properly, they should last up to a week. Ahead, we’re sharing our top tips for storing cucumbers the right way.

Shopping for Cucumbers

Before you grab any cukes off the shelves (we’re close enough that we can give them a nickname, right?), choose carefully. The best cucumbers will be pure green (not yellow) and have no soft spots. Any signs of wrinkles, shrinkage, or dimples signal that the cucumber is overripe. Overripe or rotten cucumbers will have a sour taste and funky smell, so, unlike overripe bananas or apples, which are great for baking, pass on past-peak cucumbers.

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Our Tips for the Crispiest, Crunchiest, Charred-est Pizza Ever

We love ordering pizza from our favorite local slice joint or Neapolitan-style spot, but the taste of homemade pizza—especially our favorite grilled pizza recipes—is something truly special. A lightly charred crust drizzled with olive oil, a sprinkle o…

We love ordering pizza from our favorite local slice joint or Neapolitan-style spot, but the taste of homemade pizza—especially our favorite grilled pizza recipes—is something truly special. A lightly charred crust drizzled with olive oil, a sprinkle of basil leaves, a swirl of marinara sauce, and a generous amount of ooey-gooey mozzarella cheese is as simple and delicious as can be. Of course you can go all out with truffle-flavored ingredients or meat-lover toppings galore. If you’re looking for an upgrade to your summer dinner (after all, who doesn’t want a new and improved menu for entertaining family or friends?), make homemade pizza on the grill. Ahead, we’ll tell you how to do just that like a pro.

How to Grill Pizza

Any great pizza—whether wood-fried, brick-oven baked, or grilled—starts with the perfect pizza dough. You can make your own with your favorite recipe or buy store-bought from a local pizzeria. Even if you love a deep-dish or Sicilian-style pizza, now’s not the time to make an extra-large pie. Instead, Paula Disbrowe, author of Food52’s Any Night Grilling: 60 Ways to Fire Up Dinner (and More), recommends stretching the pizza dough out to ½ inch thick or less. “Place the stretched crust on a pizza peel dusted with cornmeal or semolina flour, then add your toppings right before you slide the pizza onto the hot grates,” says Disbrowe. For an extra-crispy crust, grill one side of the pizza dough first, add toppings like pizza sauce, pepperoni, meatballs, clams, or an assortment of different cheeses to the charred pizza crust, and then slide the pie (uncooked side down) back onto the grill for an additional few minutes.

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Out of Half & Half? Here Are 4 Easy Substitutes

Half-and-half is a delightful dairy product—it works just as well as a coffee creamer as it does for making luscious, rich mashed potatoes. But sometimes, you run out because life happens and you need a substitute for half-and-half. That’s where these …

Half-and-half is a delightful dairy product—it works just as well as a coffee creamer as it does for making luscious, rich mashed potatoes. But sometimes, you run out because life happens and you need a substitute for half-and-half. That’s where these genius swaps come in. Next time you’re using a recipe that calls for half-and-half and all you have is milk or cream in the fridge, turn to these savvy substitutions.

What Is Half-and-Half?

Well, it’s exactly what it sounds like! Half-and-half is a dairy product that is made by homogenizing a mixture of whole milk and heavy cream. According to the United States Department of Agriculture, which is the governing body that defines things like the difference between half-and-half and heavy whipping cream, half-and-half must contain at least 10.5 percent milkfat, but not more than 18 percent milkfat. Unlike heavy cream, half-and-half doesn’t hold its structure when whipped, so you can’t use it to make whipped cream. However, we have plenty of other brilliant recipes, like our Creamed Spinach & Parsnips, this refreshing, award-winning Lemon Basil Sherbet, and Cauliflower Gratin With Mornay Sauce.

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Making Crème Fraîche at Home Has Never Been Easier

A few months into my first year in college, I realized that I hadn’t prepared for such brokeness. In an attempt to pull myself out of college poverty, I applied for a waitressing job at a local brewpub. Aside from some insignificant retail jobs that la…

A few months into my first year in college, I realized that I hadn't prepared for such brokeness. In an attempt to pull myself out of college poverty, I applied for a waitressing job at a local brewpub. Aside from some insignificant retail jobs that lasted maybe a few weeks, I had no relevant work experience. So when it came time for my interview, I did what I seem to do best: I winged it. I spoke about everything that wasn't relevanthow pretty the detailing on the general manager's shirt was, how nicely designed the restaurant was (it had a hideous interior), how challenging school was, etc.

Eventually I had to face the music and come clean, admitting to having no experience, but really, really needing money. The general manager was visibly bummed; she genuinely wanted to hire me, but how could she at this point? She looked down at my application and said, "Well, okay, so you have no experience. I can teach you how to juggle tables. I care more about people who know and like food. Can you answer this: What is crème fraîche?" My eyes lit up immediately.

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This Is the Only Way to Store Sweet Potatoes

Oh sweet potato, oh sweet potato, how lovely is your orange flesh, fibrous skin, and bright, slightly earthy flavor. We could go on and on with a list about our favorite uses for sweet potatoes (in fact, we already have!), but today we are just here to…

Oh sweet potato, oh sweet potato, how lovely is your orange flesh, fibrous skin, and bright, slightly earthy flavor. We could go on and on with a list about our favorite uses for sweet potatoes (in fact, we already have!), but today we are just here to talk about how to shop for and store sweet potatoes. Most root vegetables like raw sweet potatoes, carrots, and hearty winter squashes have a pretty long shelf life. As a rule of thumb, most raw root vegetables can be stored at room temperature for at least a week or two before they show any signs of bruising and spoiling. There are at least five different varieties of sweet potatoes, and they can all be stored the same way. The key is to start with very fresh sweet potatoes purchased from the grocery store or farmers market. They should be firm to the touch and free of decay, according to the United States Sweet Potato Council (yes, this is a very real, very wonderful organization).

How to Store Sweet Potatoes

The best way to store your sweet potatoes is in a cool, dry, and dark area, like your pantry or the back corner on your kitchen countertop. Keep them in a bowl or basket so that they’re self-contained, and always thoroughly wash and scrub their skin before you cook them. Don’t store potatoes of any variety in the refrigerator, as the cold air can activate their sugars and starches, causing them to spoil faster. A simple sign of this structural change is when tiny white specks appear in raw sweet potatoes. Store them away from a heat source, too, per the U.S. Sweet Potato Council. And while you shouldn’t put sweet potatoes in the refrigerator, you can, surprisingly, freeze sweet potatoes. Frozen sweet potatoes may be stored for up to 12 months. You must start with cooked sweet potatoes, which should be peeled and boiled. Once a fork can easily pierce their flesh, slice or mash the cooked sweet potatoes and top them off with a small amount of freshly squeezed lemon juice, which will preserve their vibrant orange color. Place the potatoes in the freezer in plastic bags and lay them flat.

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These Are the Best Substitutes for Cardamom, Hands Down

Cardamom is a powerful, extra-special spice that can add warmth to savory and sweet dishes alike, from challah and roast poultry, to blondies, hot chocolate, snickerdoodles, and rice pudding. “Think about creative ways to use cardamom and make it a go-…

Cardamom is a powerful, extra-special spice that can add warmth to savory and sweet dishes alike, from challah and roast poultry, to blondies, hot chocolate, snickerdoodles, and rice pudding. “Think about creative ways to use cardamom and make it a go-to spice. It can be a substitute for cinnamon, rather than the other way around,” says Angel Anderson, owner of The Spice Suite in Washington D.C. Ahead, learn all about what makes cardamom unique—and, should you ever run out, the best spice substitutes to use in its place.

What Is Cardamom?

Cardamom is a spice that adds warmth to sweet and savory dishes. There are two types of cardamom seeds that you’ll find in a grocery store or spice shop—green cardamom and black cardamom. Green cardamom is the type that home cooks and bakers are more likely familiar with, but both varieties of this expensive spice have a place in savory and sweet dishes. Because it can be pricey to buy both whole and ground cardamom (Anderson notes that it’s the third most expensive spice in the world), you’re more likely to come across recipes that call for green cardamom, so that’s the best variety to have on hand. “Even if you’re not a baker, you can add ground green cardamom to French toast, pancakes, or biscuits—things that most people make all the time—when you’re tired of cinnamon,” she adds.

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How to Buy and Use Broccoli Rabe, Everyone’s Favorite Bitter Green

Broccoli rabe (pronounced “rahb”) seems like it should be a type of broccoli. Its flowers look like tiny broccoli florets, and if you stripped its stalk of leaves, you might swear it’s broccolini. You’d be wrong, but not so far off&md…

Broccoli rabe (pronounced “rahb”) seems like it should be a type of broccoli. Its flowers look like tiny broccoli florets, and if you stripped its stalk of leaves, you might swear it’s broccolini. You'd be wrong, but not so far off—broccoli rabe is a member of the brassica family, although it’s more closely related to turnips than broccoli. And don't be fooled at the market: broccoli rabe masquerades under a variety of names, including broccoli raab, rapini, bitter broccoli, turnip broccoli, and broccoli di rape.

What to Look For
Choose firm, small-stemmed specimens with compact, tightly closed, dark green florets and leaves that aren’t wilted, and make sure to avoid yellow leaves and flowers. As with broccoli, the florets turn yellow as it ages, so yellow flowers are a sign that your bunch of broccoli rabe is past its prime. For extra insurance, give your stems the sniff test, and pass on any with an unpleasant smell (think off-putting cabbage aroma).

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Got Broccoli? Don’t Toss The Stalks.

A Big Little Recipe has the smallest-possible ingredient list and big everything else: flavor, creativity, wow factor. That means five ingredients or fewer—not including water, salt, black pepper, and certain fats (like oil and butter), since we’re gue…

A Big Little Recipe has the smallest-possible ingredient list and big everything else: flavor, creativity, wow factor. That means five ingredients or fewer—not including water, salt, black pepper, and certain fats (like oil and butter), since we're guessing you have those covered. Psst, did you hear we’re coming out with a cookbook? We’re coming out with a cookbook!


Raise your hand if you’ve ever thrown away a broccoli stalk. Go on. No one’s looking.

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