How to Make Chicharrones at Home

Cara Nicoletti of The Meat Hook helps us get to know our favorite cuts of meat a little bit better—and introduces us to a few new ones, too. Read on, study up, then hightail it to your nearest butcher.
If former articles in this column are a…

Cara Nicoletti of The Meat Hook helps us get to know our favorite cuts of meat a little bit betterand introduces us to a few new ones, too. Read on, study up, then hightail it to your nearest butcher.

If former articles in this column are any indication, it's pretty clear that I think crispy skin is the tops. Frankly, we’re all for crispy everything but today we’re here to talk about homemade chicharrones. Chicharrones are a traditional Spanish dish consisting of fried pork belly or pork rinds. It’s as delicious as it sounds. We've talked about getting our pork skin crisp while cooking pork belly, and then again later with pork shoulder and chops. We've talked about crispy skin while spatchcocking and beer-canning our chickens, and à l’orange-ing ducks, and maybe we snuck some of the gribenes out of our apple and onion schmaltz to snack on, too. (I’m not here to judge.)

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If You Love Cinnamon Buns, You’ll Really Love Kanelstang

The Perfect Loaf is a column from software engineer turned bread expert (and Food52’s Resident Bread Baker) Maurizio Leo. Maurizio is here to show us all things naturally leavened, enriched, yeast-risen, you name it—basically, every vehicle to slather …

The Perfect Loaf is a column from software engineer turned bread expert (and Food52's Resident Bread Baker) Maurizio Leo. Maurizio is here to show us all things naturally leavened, enriched, yeast-risen, you name it—basically, every vehicle to slather a lot of butter on. Today, a sourdough version of Danish kanelstang.


If you’ve ever baked pain d’épi, which is a classic French baguette made to look like a stalk of wheat, you’re familiar with the charm of rolling, snipping, and twisting, yielding a baked good that livens up any dinner table. Instead of scoring the dough with a razor blade and letting it rise straight up, the bread is cut with scissors into alternating petals. The Danish kanelstang (which translates to “cinnamon stick”) has the same vibe as the pain d'épi, but just filled with sugar, butter, and warm spices. Think American-style sweet cinnamon roll with fancy French shaping—a mix of flavor and aesthetic that’s perfect for a morning or afternoon treat.

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How to Make Noodle Kugel Without a Recipe

Here at Food52, we love recipes—but do we always use them? Of course not. Because once you realize you don’t always need a recipe, you’ll make your favorite dishes a lot more often.
Today: Whether you grew up on your bubbe’s kugel or yo…

Here at Food52, we love recipes—but do we always use them? Of course not. Because once you realize you don't always need a recipe, you'll make your favorite dishes a lot more often.

Today: Whether you grew up on your bubbe's kugel or you have no idea what kugel is, you can (and should) make a perfectly sweet, family-friendly casserole that will have you noshing in no time.

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Excellent Gluten-Free Sourdough Bread Is Possible—in Just 5 Easy Steps

Just as appetites are growing for ancient wheat flours like spelt, Kamut, and einkorn, so too is consumer demand for naturally gluten-free flours like buckwheat, sorghum, and teff—albeit a bit more slowly. Little by little, whether they have gluten int…

Just as appetites are growing for ancient wheat flours like spelt, Kamut, and einkorn, so too is consumer demand for naturally gluten-free flours like buckwheat, sorghum, and teff—albeit a bit more slowly. Little by little, whether they have gluten intolerances or not, bakers are beginning to appreciate the unique flavors presented by gluten-free alternatives. The result? Tastier loaves of gluten-free bread.

1. Stock Up on "Short" & "Long" Flours

“Gluten-free isn’t a fad diet, and it isn’t a diet that lacks,” said Naomi Devlin, the U.K.-based author of River Cottage Gluten Free. “It potentially could be a diet that has a lot more flavor and diversity in it.” Despite being seemingly everywhere, gluten is found only in three cereals: barley, wheat, and rye (plus hybrids like triticale). On the other hand, gluten-free grains and cereals are far more numerous: buckwheat, teff, millet, corn, sorghum, rice, lentil, chickpea, almond, quinoa, amaranth—the list goes on.

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Everything You Need to Know About Taro

Every week we get Down & Dirty, in which we break down our favorite unique seasonal fruits, vegetables, and more.
Today: Get to know a tropical tuber you might have been missing out on. Read More >>

Every week we get Down & Dirty, in which we break down our favorite unique seasonal fruits, vegetables, and more.

Today: Get to know a tropical tuber you might have been missing out on.

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Marjoram Is the Most Underrated Herb, Period

Every week we get Down & Dirty, in which we break down our favorite unique seasonal fruits, vegetables, and more.
Today: We’ve been stocking up on fresh herbs to get our spring fix. Next up, marjoram. Read More >>

Every week we get Down & Dirty, in which we break down our favorite unique seasonal fruits, vegetables, and more.

Today: We've been stocking up on fresh herbs to get our spring fix. Next up, marjoram.

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A Foolproof Formula for Mocktails That Sparkle

We’ve teamed up with LaCroix Sparkling Water to share an easy formula for making any-occasion mocktails, from celebratory spritzes to sippable sparklers. Our tip for the best booze-free beverages: Start with a fresh and flavorful sparkling water base, …

We've teamed up with LaCroix Sparkling Water to share an easy formula for making any-occasion mocktails, from celebratory spritzes to sippable sparklers. Our tip for the best booze-free beverages: Start with a fresh and flavorful sparkling water base, like LaCroix Sparkling Waters, which are free of sugar and artificial ingredients (so you can feel good about drinking ‘em morning, noon, and night).


As someone who could always stand to be a bit more hydrated, sparkling water (or bubble water, as I like to call it) is my saving grace. Normal water? Snooze fest. Sparkling water? Yes, please! It’s basically how I trick myself into drinking an adequate amount of water on any given day, almost like a hidden vegetables mac and cheese approach to hydration.

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Making Paneer at Home Is Totally Doable, Promise

Considering that India is one of the largest milk producing countries in the world, it is rather surprising that it doesn’t have a major cheese-making culture. You won’t find stinky and moldy cheeses in the shops that line India’s busy, narrow streets …

Considering that India is one of the largest milk producing countries in the world, it is rather surprising that it doesn't have a major cheese-making culture. You won't find stinky and moldy cheeses in the shops that line India's busy, narrow streets —but almost every dairy shop carries paneer, an immensely popular fresh cheese. 

Paneer is such a dominant culinary symbol in India because, unlike other cheeses, it doesn’t require animal rennet. This makes it perfect for the predominantly vegetarian Indian diet. Paneer makes a great meat substitute in most Indian recipes, but even non-vegetarians like myself love it. From sweets, to fried snacks, to cream-drunk royal curries, paneer is used in North Indian dishes extensively. Its mild taste, texture (similar to that of halloumi or tofu), and capability to soak in flavors and withstand high cooking temperatures make it a household favorite. 

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Jarred Matbucha Is the Ultimate Pantry Staple

There can never be too many condiments. Tomatoes are the vehicle that often drives these concoctions—salsa, harissa, and ketchup, to name a few—to stardom. Another tomato-based sauce, matbucha, is starting to gain more mainstream popularity as it’s inc…

There can never be too many condiments. Tomatoes are the vehicle that often drives these concoctions—salsa, harissa, and ketchup, to name a few—to stardom. Another tomato-based sauce, matbucha, is starting to gain more mainstream popularity as it’s increasingly sold premade. Of course, the zesty Moroccan mix of tomatoes, red peppers, olive oil, garlic, and spices has a long history in households and restaurant kitchens, but this relative newcomer to the manufactured condiment game certainly is worth paying attention to.

Matbucha likely originated in the cuisines of the Maghreb region in North Africa, which includes countries like Egypt and Tunisia, but it’s most strongly associated with Moroccan cuisine. Matbucha means “cooked” in Arabic, and it is made by slowly cooking down fragrant roasted garlic, juicy tomatoes, oil, and sweet and/or hot peppers with a selection of North African spices that change from cook to cook—cumin, paprika, and turmeric are all likely to make an appearance. Its flavor is a balanced union of acidity, heat, saltiness, and sweetness. In Israel, where many Moroccan Jews have roots, matbucha is a common picnic and breakfast accompaniment to cooked meals, sandwiches, and barbecue, beloved by myriad ethnicities within the country. It’s also a frequent member of the salatim, or salads, in a meze spread you’d find at a Mediterranean restaurant. Its popularity in Israel is perhaps best showcased by the fact that it’s manufactured by a number of local brands and sold at grocery stores. In the U.S., it’s been primarily a home-cooked indulgence—until now.

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Our Go-To Methods for Storing Fresh Ginger

From tummy troubles to baked goods, fresh ginger has many uses in the kitchen. It’s packed with flavor, and a little bit goes a long way. If you’ve ever bought fresh ginger root, you know that you can spend 50 cents on a 2-inch piece of ginger that will last for weeks—but how do you store ginger to make sure that it stays as fresh as possible?

How to Store Fresh Ginger

Before you pick up any piece of ginger from the grocery store, choose one carefully. Look for a piece of ginger that is quite firm to the touch and has smooth skin; any soft spots or slightly wrinkly skin is a sign that it’s already past its peak.

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From tummy troubles to baked goods, fresh ginger has many uses in the kitchen. It’s packed with flavor, and a little bit goes a long way. If you’ve ever bought fresh ginger root, you know that you can spend 50 cents on a 2-inch piece of ginger that will last for weeks—but how do you store ginger to make sure that it stays as fresh as possible?

How to Store Fresh Ginger

Before you pick up any piece of ginger from the grocery store, choose one carefully. Look for a piece of ginger that is quite firm to the touch and has smooth skin; any soft spots or slightly wrinkly skin is a sign that it’s already past its peak.

Read More >>