chicken liver pâté

I started hosting Passover seder four years ago. My dad had just passed away and my mother, who usually hosts, appreciated the relief. I don’t usually host holidays — well, they let me have Hanukkah — because our space is so …

I started hosting Passover seder four years ago. My dad had just passed away and my mother, who usually hosts, appreciated the relief. I don’t usually host holidays — well, they let me have Hanukkah — because our space is so small and the traffic, so terrible, but I must have done too good of a job because I haven’t stopped since. This means I have a secret archive of Passover recipes I’ve been keeping from you, and it’s rather rude. Here is one.

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lemon cream meringues

I don’t trust anyone who doesn’t like lemon curd. You, in turn, might choose not to trust anyone who makes bold, sweeping, and questionably necessary proclamations, but if I were to pick a completely superfluous soapbox to stand on…

I don’t trust anyone who doesn’t like lemon curd. You, in turn, might choose not to trust anyone who makes bold, sweeping, and questionably necessary proclamations, but if I were to pick a completely superfluous soapbox to stand on, it’s currently this. Everyone loves lemon curd. The only thing better than lemon curd is lemon curd against a pillowy meringue and a plume of softly whipped cream. These three flavors together are the basis of so many desserts, including a chaotic one I call a Lemon Meringue Pie Smash in my second cookbook. It was while working on this recipe that I got my go-to lemon curd down to a simple formula that never fails, and also came to appreciate the culinary harmony of a dessert that doesn’t leave us with leftover stray egg whites or yolks.

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Passover Seder for $25? Totally Possible.

Nickel & Dine is a budget column by Rebecca Firkser, assigning editor at Food52. Rebecca usually shares an easy, flavor-packed recipe that feeds four for $10 or less—this is a special edition: a $25 Passover for six to eight.

Passover seder is a…

Nickel & Dine is a budget column by Rebecca Firkser, assigning editor at Food52. Rebecca usually shares an easy, flavor-packed recipe that feeds four for $10 or less—this is a special edition: a $25 Passover for six to eight.


Passover seder is a festive meal. Guests are encouraged to recline at the table, and drink many glasses of wine while enjoying multiple dishes throughout the evening (literally, there’s a prayer book that tells us to do all these things). My childhood memories of the holiday are around a dining room table—specifically, several of my dad's cousins’ tables, pushed together in the middle of their New Jersey living room. And as I grew up, I found myself wanting to host my own seder. I wanted to bring together a gaggle of loved ones over those pushed-together tables and a very delicious meal.

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How Much Brisket Do I Need Per Person?

If you want to know how much brisket you need to serve per person, you first need to watch Mean Girls (or, if you’re a woman between the ages of 25 and 35, re-watch for the 100th time). The answer lies with the protagonist character Cady Heron, played…

If you want to know how much brisket you need to serve per person, you first need to watch Mean Girls (or, if you’re a woman between the ages of 25 and 35, re-watch for the 100th time). The answer lies with the protagonist character Cady Heron, played by Lindsey Lohan, who will tell you “the limit does not exist.” I understand this doesn’t help you determine how many pounds of raw brisket to purchase from the butcher before Passover or Rosh Hashanah. But it’s true. If your brisket is fork-tender and flavorful beyond belief, people will keep going back for more. And even when they retire from the dinner table to the couch and change from fancy clothes to sweatpants, a few people will obviously be craving leftover brisket within (checks watch) 90 minutes. But yes, we do have a handy way of estimating how much you should allot per person if your budget is not infinite.

Types of Beef Brisket

When shopping for brisket, you’ll find that there are two common cuts of meat: brisket flat (aka first-cut) and brisket point. Many brisket recipes won’t specify which cut of meat to use, so here’s what to know: brisket point has a jagged, pointy end that is ideal for pulled brisket (like these braised brisket sandwiches or chopped brisket. Flat cut brisket is what you want to use if you’re planning to braise or smoke brisket and then slice it into neat servings. Flat cut, or first-cut brisket, is a leaner cut, which means it’s at its best when cooked for several hours until it becomes juicy and tender.

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I Can’t Stop Snacking on This Matzo Toffee

A Big Little Recipe has the smallest-possible ingredient list and big everything else: flavor, creativity, wow factor. That means five ingredients or fewer—not including water, salt, black pepper, and certain fats (like oil and butter), since we’re gue…

A Big Little Recipe has the smallest-possible ingredient list and big everything else: flavor, creativity, wow factor. That means five ingredients or fewer—not including water, salt, black pepper, and certain fats (like oil and butter), since we're guessing you have those covered. Inspired by the column, the Big Little Recipes cookbook is available now.


Thirty-something years after she started making it, my mom can’t remember where this recipe came from. Maybe she got it from her mom, or a magazine, or her mom got it from a magazine. Who knows?

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Move Aside, Brisket! 8 Seder-Ready Passover Chicken Recipes

When you want a change of pace from [serving brisket]https://food52.com/recipes/19878-nach-waxman-s-brisket-of-beef) for Passover seder, make roast chicken. These 8 recipes for this crowd-friendly dish are kosher for Passover and will look so good at t…

When you want a change of pace from [serving brisket]https://food52.com/recipes/19878-nach-waxman-s-brisket-of-beef) for Passover seder, make roast chicken. These 8 recipes for this crowd-friendly dish are kosher for Passover and will look so good at the center of your table, surrounded by good wine, roasted vegetables, matzo-ball soup, maybe a spring-forward soup, and of course, flourless chocolate cake. And once you’re done cooking and serving a whole chicken, use the remaining carcass and bones to make the stock for a matzo ball soup.

1. Roast Chicken With Lemon Curd, Garlic & Chiles

“Lemon curd is typically used for sweet recipes—but why not think outside the box and take it someplace savory? This dinner makes the most of lemon curd, adding tart richness to sheet-pan chicken thighs. Fresh rosemary is a natural pairing, and chile offsets it from being overly sweet,” writes Food52 Resident Melina Hammer. Swap out the bread for serving with cooked quinoa or matzo.

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Vegans Rejoice! We Have 18 Passover Recipes for You.

During Passover, certain plant-based foods are already verboten, which makes finding vegan Passover recipes tricky. During the holiday, most Jewish households avoid chametz, or grains that have come in contact with water for longer than 18 minutes. Dep…

During Passover, certain plant-based foods are already verboten, which makes finding vegan Passover recipes tricky. During the holiday, most Jewish households avoid chametz, or grains that have come in contact with water for longer than 18 minutes. Depending on which ethnocultural group and branch of Judaism one belongs to, there may be other avoided foods during Passover, from rice to sunflower seeds to lentils. (For some, it also means avoiding anything packaged that isn’t explicitly labeled “kosher for Passover,” even if it does fall within the dietary requirements.) This can make nourishing oneself a bit challenging for vegans who thrive on plant-based staples like grains and legumes. When it comes to vegan Passover recipes that meet most of the religious guidelines, lean heavily into vegetables, quinoa, fruit, matzo, and most nuts. Same rules go for dessert—just add (dairy-free) chocolate.

These 18 vegan Passover recipes are free of chametz, and should be welcome at any seder (or for any meals throughout the week). However, some do include kitniyot (non-chametz grains and legumes that many Ashenaski Jewish households historically avoid). In recent years, the Committee on Jewish Law and Standards, which represents the interest of Conservative Jews, decided that kitniyot are kosher for Passover. If that’s not your style, skip them. You also may see a few packaged baking items, like 1:1 gluten-free flour and baking powder, that may not be specifically certified kosher for Passover. So we'll recommend that you check with your guests to see which specific and additional dietary requirements they follow during the holiday before diving in.

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18 Best Passover Desserts to Sweeten Your Seder

Passover desserts might get a bad rap, but here are 18 sweet recipes that you’ll actually want to bake and serve at seder. Some of these recipes call for packaged ingredients, such as almond flour, cocoa, or canned fruit that are not always kosher-for-…

Passover desserts might get a bad rap, but here are 18 sweet recipes that you’ll actually want to bake and serve at seder. Some of these recipes call for packaged ingredients, such as almond flour, cocoa, or canned fruit that are not always kosher-for-Passover products. So if you are keeping kosher for Passover, be sure to check the certification on the package first before buying and baking. All of these recipes are free from chametz ("wheat, barley, rye, oats or spelt that has come into contact with water and been allowed to ferment," according to Chabad.org) and kitniyot (corn, rice, sesame, or legumes), so you can feel good about offering them to your family and friends celebrating the holiday.


Best Passover Desserts

1. Chocolate Meringue Cookies

Meringue cookies always feel like a treat and these extra chocolatey ones are a dream Passover dessert. They’re made with just five ingredients—egg whites, vanilla extract, cream of tartar, superfine sugar, and cocoa powder.

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10 Best Kosher Wines for Your Passover Seder

Kosher wine is produced like any other white, rosé, or red wine, but with a key exception—it must be made under the supervision of a rabbi and use certified kosher ingredients and equipment, according to Jewish law. Although not all Jewish wine lovers …

Kosher wine is produced like any other white, rosé, or red wine, but with a key exception—it must be made under the supervision of a rabbi and use certified kosher ingredients and equipment, according to Jewish law. Although not all Jewish wine lovers solely drink kosher wine, it’s important to have a few bottles on the table for Passover. All of the wines on this list are certified kosher, though not all are certified kosher for Passover so pick up the bottle that works best for your celebration. So we turned to leading Jewish food and wine experts—and a few of our own team members—for their recommendations on the best Kosher wines to serve with your Passover meal.


Best Kosher Wines for Passover

1. O'Dwyers Creek Sauvignon Blanc, $19.99

"This one is always my go-to white wine for dinners and Passover especially. It's light, not sweet, and very drinkable.” —Shannon Sarna, editor of The Nosher

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Everything You Need for a Beautiful Passover Table

Any holiday dinner can be an excuse to break out the best and brightest of your serveware, and Passover, especially, is the perfect chance to create an elegant, bold tablescape to impress your friends and family. “Passover seder,” says Devora Wilhelm, …

Any holiday dinner can be an excuse to break out the best and brightest of your serveware, and Passover, especially, is the perfect chance to create an elegant, bold tablescape to impress your friends and family. “Passover seder,” says Devora Wilhelm, Co-Director of Chabad Young Professionals Upper East Side, “should feel like a royal table, as the whole experience is about how Jews left exile and were redeemed.” And since it is all about the table, you can focus all your attention on making it shine.

Beyond the usual serving plates and water glasses, the holiday of Passover dictates a certain assortment of items to properly celebrate, and since your guests will be seated at the table for several hours, you’ll want to be sure to have all your decorative (and practical!) ducks in a row.

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