Apple Jelly

I was recently reunited with something I miss very much – a loaded apple tree! Friends of mine who had a house in the French countryside had a tree that, come fall, had so many apples, the limbs threatened to break off. Not wanting to be an accomplice in apple-cide, I decided to do my part to save the tree, and the apples, and make…

I was recently reunited with something I miss very much – a loaded apple tree! Friends of mine who had a house in the French countryside had a tree that, come fall, had so many apples, the limbs threatened to break off. Not wanting to be an accomplice in apple-cide, I decided to do my part to save the tree, and the apples, and make Apple Jelly.

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Peanut Butter and Jelly Bars

Peanut Butter and Jelly Bars are packed with two kinds of peanut butter and plenty of jam. These bars are a delicious way to turn a favorite childhood sandwich into dessert!  I don’t know what it is about this time of year, but it seems like every September, right around back-to-school time, I get a […]

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Peanut Butter and Jelly Bars are packed with two kinds of peanut butter and plenty of jam. These bars are a delicious way to turn a favorite childhood sandwich into dessert! 

Four peanut butter and jelly bars scattered on a white plate next to a knife with peanut butter on the tip

I don’t know what it is about this time of year, but it seems like every September, right around back-to-school time, I get a serious craving for these peanut butter and jelly bars.

These bars are a tried and true Ina Garten recipe that I originally shared way back in the early years of my blog and I have made them countless times since then.

(more…)

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Cherry Jam

One of the first “recipes” on this blog was No-Recipe Cherry Jam, posted in 2005. Why some hyperventilated about making something without an exact recipe, a lot of people successfully used those guidelines to make cherry jam over the last fifteen years. The basis for it was how I’ve been making jam forever; use 3 parts sugar to 4 parts fruit puree. The standard ratio…

One of the first “recipes” on this blog was No-Recipe Cherry Jam, posted in 2005. Why some hyperventilated about making something without an exact recipe, a lot of people successfully used those guidelines to make cherry jam over the last fifteen years. The basis for it was how I’ve been making jam forever; use 3 parts sugar to 4 parts fruit puree. The standard ratio is to use equal parts sugar to fruit puree but I like to use less.

 

When I scored a full flat of griottes (sour cherries) at the market last week, which are a rare find at the markets. They were well-priced (€10!), which made them even harder to resist bringing them home. Sour cherries don’t last long after they are picked; within 24 hours they’ll start losing their luster and need to be used. So I made cherry jam.

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Bubbly Jam Margaritas.

We very much need jam margaritas right now. I’m temporarily bringing back cocktail Thursdays so you can make the ultimate pantry drink this weekend: bubbly jam margaritas!  Oh yes. You can use any flavor of jam that you love – throw it in a shaker with some tequila and lime juice and here we are. […]

The post Bubbly Jam Margaritas. appeared first on How Sweet Eats.

We very much need jam margaritas right now.

These bubbly jam margaritas are easy and delicious! Use your favorite jam instead of simple syrup to create a fruity flavor everyone will love.

I’m temporarily bringing back cocktail Thursdays so you can make the ultimate pantry drink this weekend: bubbly jam margaritas! 

strawberry jam

Oh yes. You can use any flavor of jam that you love – throw it in a shaker with some tequila and lime juice and here we are.

In a very good place.

A very good, salted rim, frothy icy beverage type of place. 

P.S. if you’re in need of other quarantine cocktail ideas, I’ve done thirsty Thursdays here on the blog for yearsss… you have tons of options right here

These bubbly jam margaritas are easy and delicious! Use your favorite jam instead of simple syrup to create a fruity flavor everyone will love.

I’m also gearing up for cinco de mayo at home. I want to make tacos, maybe nachos and definitely a margarita next Tuesday. If you’re in the market for a fantastic margarita at home, aside from my favorite classic, here are my top five: 

Pink grapefruit margaritas

Blood orange margaritas

Watermelon rosé margaritas

Mojito margaritas

Coconut creamsicle margaritas

Don’t they all sound incredible? They are. I promise.

These bubbly jam margaritas are easy and delicious! Use your favorite jam instead of simple syrup to create a fruity flavor everyone will love.

Aside from that, I’ve only been having a cocktail on Friday night! Okay, maaaaybe Saturday. But I’ve made it a little tradition right now to have one on Friday evenings and it’s really nice. This is by far my newest favorite!

These bubbly jam margaritas are easy and delicious! Use your favorite jam instead of simple syrup to create a fruity flavor everyone will love.

So!

The best part about this? You don’t have to make a simple syrup. Simple syrup is ridiculously easy to make, and you can easily make a batch in advance and store it in the fridge, but it’s also just another step, you know?

However, instead of syrup, we’re doing the jam!

This isn’t the first time I’ve made a jam cocktail. Sixish years ago I made a cider jam bourbon cocktail and it inspired a ton of ideas using the jam. It’s the easiest way to make any fruity drink in an effortless manner. 

These bubbly jam margaritas are easy and delicious! Use your favorite jam instead of simple syrup to create a fruity flavor everyone will love.

The varieties I’ve tried so far for margaritas: strawberry, blackberry with jalapeños, apricot, peach and fig. It helps that I have a serious obsession with american spoon and buy at least 12 jams every summer when we are in Michigan. I should be making pitchers of margaritas with all of the jam I have! 

Once you shake everything up with ice, pour it into your salted rim glass, you add a liitttttle top off. I suggest going with a lime seltzer, but I won’t lie: I’ve tried prosecco too! It was delish. Because this entire cup is just wonderful.

Try try try!

These bubbly jam margaritas are easy and delicious! Use your favorite jam instead of simple syrup to create a fruity flavor everyone will love.

Bubbly Jam Margaritas

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Bubbly Jam Margaritas

These bubbly jam margaritas are easy and delicious! Use your favorite jam instead of simple syrup to create a fruity flavor everyone will love.
Course Drinks
Cuisine American
Prep Time 15 minutes
Total Time 15 minutes
Servings 1 cocktail, is easily multiplied
Author How Sweet Eats

Ingredients

  • coarse salt or tajin for the rim
  • 2 ounces lime juice
  • 2 ounces your favorite jam
  • 1 1/2 ounces tequila
  • 1 ounce orange liqueur, optional (like Grand Mariner or Triple Sec)
  • 1 ounce lime seltzer
  • lime wedges for garnish
  • optional add: sliced jalapeno peppers

Instructions

  • Rim a glass with a lime wedge and dip it in the salt. Fill the glass with ice.
  • Fill a shaker cup with ice. Add the lime juice, tequila, jam and orange liqueur (if you’re using it!). Shake for 30 seconds, until the drink is frothy. Pour it in the glass over ice. Top with the lime seltzer and garnish with lime wedges!
  • Jam ideas: strawberry, blackberry, apricot, orange, peach, fig, etc!

These bubbly jam margaritas are easy and delicious! Use your favorite jam instead of simple syrup to create a fruity flavor everyone will love.

Annnnd the rest of quarantine will look like this.

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Pink Grapefruit Marmalade

I’ve been making my own jams and marmalades for many years, so with apologies to those who’ve asked me which French jam to buy when they come to Paris, they’re often disappointed when I can’t guide them in the right direction. (Unless they want me to guide them to my jam-crowded kitchen cupboard.) Unless someone has given me a jar of theirs, I have so…

I’ve been making my own jams and marmalades for many years, so with apologies to those who’ve asked me which French jam to buy when they come to Paris, they’re often disappointed when I can’t guide them in the right direction. (Unless they want me to guide them to my jam-crowded kitchen cupboard.) Unless someone has given me a jar of theirs, I have so much on hand that, I can say without a hint of snobbery (but out of necessity) that I only eat my own. Romain is used to them, too, but when he tasted this Pink Grapefruit Marmalade, he put his morning coffee down to tell me that this was the best marmalade that he’s ever had.

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Salzburger Nockerl

When I saw the cover of Alpine Cooking, before it came out, it quickly rose to the top of the list of books I needed to get my hands on. I was fortunate to get a preview when I was asked to write a quote for the book jacket, and was thrilled to find the inside of the book was even more compelling than the…

When I saw the cover of Alpine Cooking, before it came out, it quickly rose to the top of the list of books I needed to get my hands on. I was fortunate to get a preview when I was asked to write a quote for the book jacket, and was thrilled to find the inside of the book was even more compelling than the cover. While it’s hard to compete with the Matterhorn, pictures of locals contemplating a melted cheese sandwich, or a wooden châlet terrace with place settings soon to be heaped with hearty mountain fare, brought the alps right to me.

Covering Italy, Austria, Switzerland, and France, author Meredith Erickson, takes us through cheese caves, ski slopes, restaurants, fondue pots, snow-caked ski boots, and villages, that are all part of the European alps. As Meredith noted in the book, in the winter, if you’re cooking in the alps, there isn’t a lot of fresh produce available in the winter. In fact, there may not be any at all. (Those who live in winter climates, who shop their local farmers market can relate to five months of squash, potatoes, and onions.) So jam fills in.

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Bacon Jam

One thing that’s great about the European Union is that it helps me explain the United States to Europeans. America is so big that France could fit inside Texas, and explaining the difference between California and Tennessee could be compared to the wide expanse between two diverse cultures, and like Denmark and Greece. I didn’t grow up eating food from the American south; in New…

One thing that’s great about the European Union is that it helps me explain the United States to Europeans. America is so big that France could fit inside Texas, and explaining the difference between California and Tennessee could be compared to the wide expanse between two diverse cultures, and like Denmark and Greece.

I didn’t grow up eating food from the American south; in New England we had lobsters and corn-on-the-cob, not collard greens, okra, and sorghum syrup. (Although once I discovered the latter, I saw – or I mean, I tasted, what I was missing.) Still, it’s not something I know much about, although I do get amused watching people get really worked up over a teaspoon or two of sugar in cornbread.

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