10 TikTok Recipes Worth Trying (Trust Us—We Did)

2021 has been the year that TikTok took over food media. As people spent more time in the kitchen and on their phones, lockdown season one provided the ideal springboard for TikTok to catapult itself to the upper echelons of ubiquity. (Now before you g…

2021 has been the year that TikTok took over food media. As people spent more time in the kitchen and on their phones, lockdown season one provided the ideal springboard for TikTok to catapult itself to the upper echelons of ubiquity. (Now before you go calling me a grandpa, I know the app has been around for a few years now, but it wasn’t until recently that I started to feel its effects on a seismic level.)

Around March of last year, the viral trends started to pour in. First there was dalgona coffee and pancake cereal. These kitchen adventures filled our newly found free time with brief, shareable moments of experimentation.

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Has This Pasta ‘Hack’ Gone Too Far?

Spaghetti can be a divisive food. Just ask Italians. Every once in a while, a recipe comes along that causes traditionalists to bristle, to seethe at unwarranted alterations. To some the inclusion of ham in a spaghetti carbonara may seem mundane, to ot…

Spaghetti can be a divisive food. Just ask Italians. Every once in a while, a recipe comes along that causes traditionalists to bristle, to seethe at unwarranted alterations. To some the inclusion of ham in a spaghetti carbonara may seem mundane, to others it’s downright apocalyptic.

There is, however, a new spaghetti trick causing more mayhem than usual. It appears in a video that began making the rounds first on Facebook and then on Twitter where it caused quite the stir. Let’s break it down.

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The Chrissy Teigen-Approved Method to Organize Your Fridge

There are countless ways to organize your fridge. On this site alone, we’ve suggested bins and baskets and plastic tubs for storing greens. I’ve spent many a moment lamenting the calamity that is my cluttered icebox, wondering if there was some method …

There are countless ways to organize your fridge. On this site alone, we’ve suggested bins and baskets and plastic tubs for storing greens. I’ve spent many a moment lamenting the calamity that is my cluttered icebox, wondering if there was some method to escape all the madness. A clean and tidy fridge is close to godliness… isn’t that how the saying goes?

Well, perhaps this Chrissy Teigen video can offer some advice. A few weeks ago, she partnered with organizing expert Krystal Guinn (who she met on Instagram) to make an informational video about fridge organization. The video, uploaded to Teigen’s YouTube channel, clocks in at just over four minutes and offers a foolproof, easy-to-follow method to fill your fridge in a way that makes sense.

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Costco’s Recalling Canned Black Beans—Here’s Why

If you’ve recently bought a can of beans from Costco, you may want to keep reading. Faribault Foods, Inc., who sell many of their foods at the chain, have issued a voluntary recall on some of their canned goods due to a potential compromise of their he…

If you’ve recently bought a can of beans from Costco, you may want to keep reading. Faribault Foods, Inc., who sell many of their foods at the chain, have issued a voluntary recall on some of their canned goods due to a potential compromise of their hermetic seals.

A compromised hermetic seal may cause a can to bloat, leak or even support the growth of certain bacterias like Clostridium botulinum, which can lead to botulism. According to the FDA, botulism “poisoning in humans can begin from six hours to two weeks after eating food that contains the toxin. Symptoms may include double vision, blurred vision, drooping eyelids, slurred speech, difficulty swallowing, and muscle weakness.”

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Is an iSi Cooking Tool Really Worth All the Hype?

When I worked at a cooking school in Barcelona, a lot of information came at me fast. I was juggling a new language, a new culinary lexicon, a whole slew of new adopted workplace behaviors. I often found myself asking: What’s that? Can you repeat that?…

When I worked at a cooking school in Barcelona, a lot of information came at me fast. I was juggling a new language, a new culinary lexicon, a whole slew of new adopted workplace behaviors. I often found myself asking: What’s that? Can you repeat that? Can you explain this to me? And then one day: What is that metal thing and why is it called a sifón?

I would soon learn the magic of the sifón, often referred to as an iSi whip tool in English. Essentially, it’s a pressurized canister that uses gas to create foams and whips. You fill the bottle with a liquid of your choice and the combination of internal pressure and the force of a small amount of nitrous oxide (N2O) allows a bubbly foam to emerge. For example: In goes heavy cream, out comes whipped cream. Voilà!

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This Ina Garten Special Is Just What We Need Right Now

Imagine this: A beloved celebrity chef who makes you feel wistful for home-cooked meals on sun-soaked patios gets together with an actress who has an uncanny ability to make you laugh. Together, they make cocktails, tell stories, regale each other with…

Imagine this: A beloved celebrity chef who makes you feel wistful for home-cooked meals on sun-soaked patios gets together with an actress who has an uncanny ability to make you laugh. Together, they make cocktails, tell stories, regale each other with tales of their trades, and have fun doing so. Now imagine you get to watch said conversation.

Such is the premise of Cocktails and Tall Tales, a special on Discovery+ that brings together Ina Garten and Melissa McCarthy. The two connect via video chat to stir drinks, share recipes, talk, and generally have a great time. And lucky for us, we get to be a part of it.

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What’s the Honeycomb Pasta TikTok Is Buzzing Over?

The newest TikTok food trend storming the internet is, of course, about pasta. This time around, however, there’s no feta, no cherry tomatoes, and no Finnish food bloggers involved. And this time, the pasta is in the shape of a honeycomb.
It all start…

The newest TikTok food trend storming the internet is, of course, about pasta. This time around, however, there’s no feta, no cherry tomatoes, and no Finnish food bloggers involved. And this time, the pasta is in the shape of a honeycomb.

It all started when TikTok user Anna Rothfuss (@bananalovesyoutoo) posted a video of what’s being deemed "honeycomb pasta" to her page. Her approach is unique: She nestles rigatoni side by side in a springform pan with the tubular openings facing skyward. Arranged all together, they form a visually pleasing honeycomb pattern. She then stuffs each pasta tube with a section of string cheese, and pours tomato sauce over the top so it drips down to the bottom of the pan. On top of all that goes cooked ground beef and a smattering of shredded mozzarella before it’s popped into the oven and baked. What emerges is an ooey-gooey pasta dish that Rothfuss cuts into like a cake as her camera person oohs and aahs.

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Check Your Fridge: There’s a Hummus Recall

Earlier this week, the company behind Sabra hummus issued a voluntary recall on some of their products after salmonella was detected during a routine checkup. In coordination with the FDA, the Sabra Dipping Company, LLC, is recalling about 2,100 cases …

Earlier this week, the company behind Sabra hummus issued a voluntary recall on some of their products after salmonella was detected during a routine checkup. In coordination with the FDA, the Sabra Dipping Company, LLC, is recalling about 2,100 cases of their 10-ounce Classic Hummus. A single tub was found to contain potential traces of the bacteria. But before you toss all your Sabra products to the wayside, here are a few important things to know.

  • The recall is limited to a very specific product. This product is Sabra’s 10-ounce Classic Hummus with the UPC code 300067 produced on Friday, February 10, 2021, between 6:00 p.m. and midnight with a “best before” date of April 26.
  • This product was distributed to only 16 states: Alabama, Arizona, Arkansas, California, Florida, Indiana, Mississippi, Maine, Missouri, Nebraska, North Carolina, New Jersey, Utah, Virginia, Washington, and Wisconsin.
  • If you have purchased the recalled hummus, we advise throwing it out or returning it to where it was purchased.
  • To obtain a refund for the recalled hummus, you can visit this Sabra recall portal and enter the relevant information.

According to the FDA report, the consumption of food containing salmonella bacteria can cause salmonellosis, which may lead to diarrhea, abdominal cramps, and fever within 12 to 72 hours after eating a contaminated product. Most people recover without treatment, but we recommend contacting a health care provider if you’re worried about illness.

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Our New Favorite Charoset is from the Biggest Jewish Deli in Texas

Every year, in the days leading up to Passover, Ziggy Gruber makes up to 1,500 pounds of charoset. For comparison, my mom will make no more than a pound of the chopped fruit and nut mix, and there will be some left over. But when has Gruber ever done a…

Every year, in the days leading up to Passover, Ziggy Gruber makes up to 1,500 pounds of charoset. For comparison, my mom will make no more than a pound of the chopped fruit and nut mix, and there will be some left over. But when has Gruber ever done anything on a small scale?

David, who goes by Ziggy, is a third-generation deli man. His grandfather, Max, arrived in New York via Budapest at the turn of the century. He found work in delis across the city until 1927 when he opened his own, the Rialto Deli, with his brothers-in-law. The Rialto, they claim, was the first deli to open its doors on Broadway, just two years before the start of the Great Depression. Amidst the anguish of the era, the Rialto thrived, serving the likes of Ethel Merman and the Marx brothers. All three of them. Decades later, Ziggy’s father opened his own deli, on Madison Avenue and called it Genard’s. Once Ziggy came around, the family had moved, shuttered its prospects in the city, and opened a deli in decidedly quieter Spring Valley, New York.

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The Tamis Is the Underrated Kitchen Tool I Can’t Stop Thinking About

I feel intimately connected to every item in my kitchen. There’s the bowl I love to eat my oatmeal out of, the mug I only use for morning coffee, my favorite fork, the whisk I bought in college, my light green mandoline. I carry my favorites with me fr…

I feel intimately connected to every item in my kitchen. There’s the bowl I love to eat my oatmeal out of, the mug I only use for morning coffee, my favorite fork, the whisk I bought in college, my light green mandoline. I carry my favorites with me from apartment to apartment, sometimes even city to city. Some items—the hard boiled egg slicer—don’t stand the test of time. But the tried and true are here to stay.

That’s why, when I uncover a new, must-have kitchen tool, it feels like a revelation. Enter the tamis. What is a tamis? It looks like a springform pan, but with a flat metal sieve across the bottom. In Indian cooking, a chalni accomplishes a similar purpose. Others may know a tamis as a fine mesh strainer or a drum sieve (named for its shape).

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