How to make self-raising flour – Baking Basics

Self-raising flour (a.k.a. self-rising flour in the US) is a common ingredient in English baking recipes, typically used for scones, pancakes and Victoria sponge cakes. It is simply a pre-mixed combination of raising agents and flour so that you don’t need to add baking powder or bicarbonate of soda to your recipe. Here I’ve provided an alternative to shop-bought self-raising flour which you can make using 2 simple ingredients: plain flour and baking powder How much baking powder do you need to make 100g self-raising flour? The ratio for self-raising flour is that for every 75g plain white flour you must add 1 tsp (4g) baking powder. As 1 tsp of baking powder = 4g, mixing it into 75g of flour gives you 79g of ‘self-raising flour’. This can make calculating quantities for your recipe a bit tricky so, to make things simpler for your conversions, I’ve calculated that to make 100g of self-raising flour you must combine 95g plain white flour and 1 ¼ tsp (5g) baking powder Shop-bought self-raising flour vs. DIY self-raising flour I tested a small batch of a standard Victoria sponge cake recipe using my homemade replacement flour mix vs. shop bought. I used all […]

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A bowl with homemade self-raising flour substitute, a sieve, some baking powder in a jar and a tub of plain flour

Self-raising flour (a.k.a. self-rising flour in the US) is a common ingredient in English baking recipes, typically used for scones, pancakes and Victoria sponge cakes. It is simply a pre-mixed combination of raising agents and flour so that you don’t need to add baking powder or bicarbonate of soda to your recipe.

Here I’ve provided an alternative to shop-bought self-raising flour which you can make using 2 simple ingredients: plain flour and baking powder

How to make self-raising flour

How to make self-raising flour

Yield: 100 g
Prep Time: 5 minutes
Total Time: 5 minutes

How to make DIY self-raising flour from baking powder and plain white flour.

Ingredients

To make 100g self-raising flour

  • 95 g plain white flour (all-purpose flour)
  • 1 ¼ tsp (5g) baking powder

OR To make 1 cup (US) self-raising flour:

  • 116 g (1 cup minus 1 ½ tsp) plain white flour (all-purpose flour)
  • 1 ½ tsp (6g) baking powder

Instructions

  1. Place the flour into a metal sieve (strainer) set over a bowl. Add the baking powder on top and sift both together into the bowl.

Notes

  • Make sure you're using level teaspoons
  • 1 tsp = 5ml

If using volume measurements for the flour, use the spoon & sweep method to measure: fluff up the flour first, spoon flour into the cup until it is above the rim then and sweep the excess away with the back of a knife. Do not tap/shake the cup nor press the flour into the cup.

How much baking powder do you need to make 100g self-raising flour?

The ratio for self-raising flour is that for every 75g plain white flour you must add 1 tsp (4g) baking powder.

As 1 tsp of baking powder = 4g, mixing it into 75g of flour gives you 79g of ‘self-raising flour’. This can make calculating quantities for your recipe a bit tricky so, to make things simpler for your conversions, I’ve calculated that to make 100g of self-raising flour you must combine 95g plain white flour and 1 ¼ tsp (5g) baking powder

Shop-bought self-raising flour vs. DIY self-raising flour

Cross sections of two small cakes using homemade self-raising flour and shop-bought self-raising flour
LEFT: cake made with DIY self-raising flour. RIGHT: cake made with shop-bought self-raising flour

I tested a small batch of a standard Victoria sponge cake recipe using my homemade replacement flour mix vs. shop bought. I used all the same ingredients (apart from the flour, of course) and baked the mini cakes in the same oven at the same time. You can see that they look pretty similar in rise, crumb structure and colour. There was no difference in flavour either.

Why use self-raising flour?

  • The advantage of it is that if you bake infrequently, you won’t need to buy raising agents separately so you can save some money and some cupboard space. The flour and raising agents are also pre-mixed for you so you don’t have to worry about the raising agent incorporating properly into your other dry ingredients.
  • The disadvantage is that you don’t have the same level of control over the rise of your bakes as self-raising flour has a standardised level of ‘rise’ it produces. Because of this, you can only use self-raising flour in recipes which specifically call for its use. I usually don’t bake with self-raising flour as it takes up too much room in my pantry so I prefer to just have plain flour (which is more versatile than self-raising) and baking powder to hand and mix up a DIY self-raising flour when needed.

What is in self-raising flour?

Typically in the UK, self-raising flour contains plain white flour (usually with a low protein content i.e. ‘soft wheat’) with chemical raising agents mixed in. In most cases, the raising agents used are a mixture of monocalcium-phosphate (an acid) with sodium bicarbonate (an alkali) which will react together in a neutralisation reaction in the presence of liquid, producing carbon dioxide gas. This gas is what produces the bubbles needed to make cakes and biscuits rise.

What happens if I use plain flour instead of self-raising?

If a recipe calls for self-raising flour it is doing so because it is relying on the raising agents in that flour to make the baked good ‘rise’. If you use plain flour instead and don’t add any raising agents you will most likely end up with a very flat, dense bake! However, if you add baking powder to your flour in the proportions given above you won’t have that issue.

What is self-raising flour used for?

Mainly sweet baking recipes where the raising agent is needed to provide lift e.g. Victoria sponge cake, scones, Scotch pancakes, biscuits. It is also used in some flatbread recipes. However, it shouldn’t really be used in recipes where yeast is included as the yeast is meant to provide the ‘rise’, not the flour.

Does self-raising flour go off?

Self-raising flour can expire due to the raising agents within becoming inactive. This doesn’t make it unsafe to consume but it does mean that your baked good won’t rise. This is why I like to make my DIY self-raising flour just before I’m about to bake something – that way if I know that my baking powder is a bit old, I can test it before mixing it into my flour. ‘Testing’ your baking powder just involves mixing it with some white vinegar and seeing if it fizzes. If it does, you’re good to go. If not, the baking powder is expired and you’ll have to throw it away is it will no longer be useful. You can also check the expiry date given on your baking powder packaging as this should tell you if it’s super old (and thus likely to be expired!).

Have you made this recipe?
I’d love to see how it went! Tag me on instagram @izyhossack and hashtag it #topwithcinnamon so I can see your beautiful creation & reshare in my stories!

The post How to make self-raising flour – Baking Basics appeared first on Izy Hossack - Top With Cinnamon.

Holiday Stovetop Potpourri (with Printable Gift Tags!)

Simmer a batch of this Holiday Stovetop Potpourri to make your house smell like Christmas! Or package it up and gift it to a friend to let them know you’re thinking of them. I don’t know what it is about this time of year that makes me want to clean and organize all the things. …

The post Holiday Stovetop Potpourri (with Printable Gift Tags!) appeared first on My Baking Addiction.

Simmer a batch of this Holiday Stovetop Potpourri to make your house smell like Christmas! Or package it up and gift it to a friend to let them know you’re thinking of them.

Stovetop potpourri in a glass jar with a gift tag tied to it

I don’t know what it is about this time of year that makes me want to clean and organize all the things.

Maybe it’s because I find myself spending way too much time on the cleaning side of TikTok, or maybe it’s because I pulled a jar of cinnamon sticks from my cabinet two weeks ago that expired in 2015.

Not exactly sure, but here we are.

Once I pulled the 5-year-old cinnamon sticks from my cabinet, I decided to just pull out every single jar, check the expiration dates, decant some of them and organize them a bit.

Along with 3 jars of cinnamon sticks I also some found some cloves, star anise and ginger that needed to used, so I whipped up a batch of stovetop potpourri the next day.

Let me tell you, I can’t get enough of the festive scent that it puts in the air.

Move over Bath & Body Works Hot Cocoa & Cream candle, there’s a new fave scent in town!

(more…)

The post Holiday Stovetop Potpourri (with Printable Gift Tags!) appeared first on My Baking Addiction.

Dehydrated Citrus Garland DIY

DEHYDRATED CITRUS GARLAND DIYOur Dehydrated Citrus Wheels are one of the easiest DIYs we have on the blog. Using a batch of dehydrated citrus wheels to make a garland seemed like a no brainer. It’s also a really simple DIY, and it yields such a b…

DEHYDRATED CITRUS GARLAND DIY
Our Dehydrated Citrus Wheels are one of the easiest DIYs we have on the blog. Using a batch of dehydrated citrus wheels to make a garland seemed like a no brainer. It’s also a really simple DIY, and it yields such a beautiful result. You can use…
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Rosemary Sprig Place Cards

ROSEMARY SPRIG PLACE CARDSPersonalized place cards are the finishing touch to any holiday table. I love thinking of new ways to make cute and easy DIYs and these Rosemary Sprig Place Cards fall into both of the categories! Cute and easy. This DIY takes…

ROSEMARY SPRIG PLACE CARDS
Personalized place cards are the finishing touch to any holiday table. I love thinking of new ways to make cute and easy DIYs and these Rosemary Sprig Place Cards fall into both of the categories! Cute and easy. This DIY takes only three things to make. I…
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Rosemary Wreath Place Cards

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At the farmers market I go to this one booth has these crazy long stems of rosemary. They are so huge and fragrant. I am always trying to think of a creative non food way of using them. This idea of using them for place cards just…
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Dehydrated Citrus Wheels

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Homemade Bisquick

Homemade Bisquick comes together in less than 5 minutes and can be used in any recipe that calls for Bisquick or all-purpose baking mix.

The post Homemade Bisquick appeared first on My Baking Addiction.

Homemade Bisquick comes together in less than 5 minutes and can be used in any recipe that calls for Bisquick mix or all-purpose baking mix. It’s perfect for things like pancakes, biscuits, and diner-style muffins.

Homemade Bisquick mix in a glass jar with a stack of pancakes and a carafe of orange juice in the background

Most of the time I’m all about baking and cooking from scratch – until I’m not. Like those Sunday mornings when I don’t set an alarm and the whole family sleeps in until 10:00.

I know that sounds pretty blissful, but…

The problem is, I’m a creature of habit and sleeping in always throws me off my game in a big way.

I love waking up early and sipping coffee at my desk in complete silence. It’s when I make lists and online shop for things I don’t need – like lipgloss and mason jar cocktail shakers.

And when I don’t get that time? I feel flustered and out of sorts.
(more…)

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Garlic Naan Bread

This fast and easy homemade garlic naan is brushed with garlic butter and perfectly chewy! It’s such a treat, you’ll never go back to storebought. What’s better alongside a steaming bowl of curry than warm garlic naan? This Indian skillet flatbread is always a crowd pleaser: it’s soft, supple, warm and garlic-scented. There’s not much better to sop up savory broth! There are all sorts of creative ways to turn naan into dinner too: like naan pizza! It’s easy to find this famous bread at the store, but the very best way to eat it: homemade, right off the skillet. Here’s our very best naan recipe: it’s chewy, full of flavor, and quicker than most recipes. Here are all our secrets! Why make this garlic naan? With loads of naan bread recipes out there, why make this specific garlic naan? Here’s what makes it stand out from the rest: It’s a fast naan recipe. Homemade bread takes time to rise, or proof. The proof time for most naan recipes is 1 to 2 hours. The proof time for this recipe? Just 30 minutes! The flavor and texture are incredible. This naan bread is perfectly soft and fluffy, just the right […]

A Couple Cooks – Healthy, Whole Food, & Vegetarian Recipes

This fast and easy homemade garlic naan is brushed with garlic butter and perfectly chewy! It’s such a treat, you’ll never go back to storebought.

Garlic naan

What’s better alongside a steaming bowl of curry than warm garlic naan? This Indian skillet flatbread is always a crowd pleaser: it’s soft, supple, warm and garlic-scented. There’s not much better to sop up savory broth! There are all sorts of creative ways to turn naan into dinner too: like naan pizza! It’s easy to find this famous bread at the store, but the very best way to eat it: homemade, right off the skillet. Here’s our very best naan recipe: it’s chewy, full of flavor, and quicker than most recipes. Here are all our secrets!

Why make this garlic naan?

With loads of naan bread recipes out there, why make this specific garlic naan? Here’s what makes it stand out from the rest:

  • It’s a fast naan recipe. Homemade bread takes time to rise, or proof. The proof time for most naan recipes is 1 to 2 hours. The proof time for this recipe? Just 30 minutes!
  • The flavor and texture are incredible. This naan bread is perfectly soft and fluffy, just the right amount of salt and has the very best garlicky flavor. Really! You’ll have to try it for yourself.
Easy naan recipe

Fastest way to make naan: with no yeast!

There are two basic ways to make a naan dough: with yeast and with baking powder. Most traditional Indian naan recipes use yeast as the leavener: it’s what makes the bread rise. Yeasted breads require longer proofing times. What’s proofing? Proofing is when you let bread dough rest after you’ve added yeast so that it rises. A yeasted naan recipe requires 1 to 2 hours of proofing time, depending on the recipe.

Some more modern takes on naan bread use baking powder as the leavener instead of yeast (for example, the naan recipe in Indian chef Vivek Singh’s book Curry). Baking powder cuts down the proofing time to just 30 minutes. The texture is slightly more biscuit-y than bread-y, but to us this trade-off was absolutely worth it!

Use a cast iron skillet (if you have it!)

The best way to cook garlic naan? Use a cast iron skillet if you have it! Why? A cast iron skillet gets blazing hot. Just like pizza, you want to use as high heat as possible when cooking naan. It’s what makes the classic blackened marks on the dough. If you don’t have cast iron skillet: never fear! You can use any large skillet or griddle: the blackened marks will just be more subtle.

Tip: Whatever skillet you use, heat it until it’s very hot before you add the first piece of dough. If you add the dough before its roaring hot, it won’t cook correctly.

Garlic naan

Making naan is easiest with a buddy!

Alex and I have honed our expertise in homemade bread recipes over the past few years. Our sourdough bread is the most popular and has been made by people around the world. (See below for more of our favorite breads.) Here are a few tips we recommend for making this easy homemade naan bread:

  • Make sure you have time. This garlic naan recipe takes about 1 hour from start to finish. The hands on portion is about 20 to 30 minutes. We’d recommend making this for entertaining or a dinner party, or an activity on a weekend afternoon or a day off.
  • Find a buddy! You can make this recipe by yourself. BUT, it’s even more fun with a spouse, partner or friend. It’s nice to have one person roll out the naan and one person cook it. Plus, cooking together is always better!
Vegetable curry

Recipes to eat with garlic naan

There are lots of ways to eat this garlic naan bread! It’s most natural with curry, but we have several naan pizza recipes as well. Here are our favorites in both categories:

This garlic naan recipe is…

Vegetarian. For vegan, plant-based, and dairy-free, see the substitutions listed in the recipe.

Print
Garlic naan

Garlic Naan (Fast & Easy!)


1 Star2 Stars3 Stars4 Stars5 Stars (5 votes, average: 5.00 out of 5)

  • Author: Sonja Overhiser
  • Prep Time: 40 minutes
  • Cook Time: 10 minutes
  • Total Time: 50 minutes
  • Yield: 6

Description

This fast and easy homemade garlic naan is brushed with garlic butter and perfectly chewy! It’s such a treat, you’ll never go back to storebought. (Vegan substitutions listed, or go to Vegan Naan.)


Ingredients

  • 2 1/2 cups (312 grams) all purpose flour
  • 1/2 teaspoon baking powder
  • 1/4 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1 1/4 teaspoons kosher salt (1 1/2 teaspoons, for vegan)
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 3/4 cup 2% milk (water, for vegan)
  • 3 tablespoons Greek yogurt (coconut cream, for vegan)
  • 2 tablespoons salted butter (coconut oil, for vegan)
  • 1 garlic clove
  • Chopped fresh cilantro, for serving

Instructions

  1. In a large bowl, stir together the all purpose flour, baking powder, baking soda and kosher salt. Add the olive oil, milk, and Greek yogurt and stir until dough comes together. If it is dry, add a bit more milk; if it is very sticky, add a sprinkle more flour. Knead for about 30 seconds to a minute until all the flour is incorporated and a dough ball forms.
  2. Transfer the dough to a lightly oiled bowl. Rest for 30 minutes at room temperature covered with a towel.
  3. Once the dough has rested, flatten it into a disc. Then cut it into 6 equal pieces. On a clean, lightly floured countertop, roll each dough into a thin teardrop shape, about 1/8 inch thick.
  4. Meanwhile, grate the garlic. In a small saucepan, heat the butter and the garlic over medium low heat. Cook for 1 to 2 minutes until the garlic fragrant is just starting to turn yellow (but not brown), then immediately remove from the heat.
  5. Heat a cast iron skillet*, griddle or large skillet over very high heat until it’s blazing hot (make sure it’s as hot as possible, or the first piece won’t cook correctly). Add one of the pieces of dough and cook until the top has bubbles and the bottom is golden and very dark brown in spots (about 1 minute), then turn and cook another 30 seconds to 1 minute on the other side. Brush the naan with a bit of the garlic butter on both sides. Wrap it with a clean towel. Repeat with the remaining 5 naan, adding each to the towel afterwards (this will steam them and keep them warm and supple).
  6. Serve immediately with chopped cilantro. To store, place fully cooled naan in an airtight plastic bag and keep at room temperature for up to 3 days, or freeze for up to 2 months. Reheat refrigerated or frozen naan by wrapping in aluminum foil and baking in a 350°F oven for 15 minutes.

Notes

*A cast iron skillet is the best option, since it gives the signature blackened spots. A skillet works too, but won’t get as blackened.

  • Category: Bread
  • Method: Stovetop
  • Cuisine: Indian

Keywords: Garlic naan, Naan recipe, Homemade naan, Naan bread

More homemade bread recipes

If you love to make bread, we’ve got lots of resources for you! Here are our favorite bread recipes:

  • Best Sourdough Bread Easy to follow instructions, a printable checklist, and a step-by-step video help you master that tangy flavor, chewy crust, and perfect texture. (Or try the Vegan Bread version.)
  • Easy Homemade Bread This homemade bread is easy to make and very versatile: it works for sandwiches, toast, and more.
  • Artisan Dutch Oven Bread Here’s an easy Dutch oven bread with a crispy crust and tender inside.

A Couple Cooks - Healthy, Whole Food, & Vegetarian Recipes

Graham Crackers (vegan option)

Light, crisp and sweet with a hint of spices to balance them, these graham crackers are surprisingly easy to make and very moreish! Whenever we visit the States, my mum and I always buy a box of Graham crackers to snack on (and some to bring home to the UK!). They have such a light, airy texture to them and a strong scent of vanilla, it’s very easy to eat a lot of them in one go. What is the UK equivalent of a graham cracker? We don’t really have anything that is specifically like a graham cracker in the UK. In cheesecake bases where recipes indicate using graham cracker crumbs, we would typically use digestive biscuits. Digestives are slightly similar in that they are quite plain, wholegrain-y, crisp ‘biscuits’/cookies. They have a very different flavour and texture though so it’s not really the same thing (however they will do in recipes like the cheesecake base mentioned). What is the ‘graham’ in graham crackers? Unlike what me and Andy joke about, ‘Graham’ is not just some dude who realllly likes crackers. It refers to the specific type of flour – graham flour- used in the crackers. It’s a fine, whole […]

The post Graham Crackers (vegan option) appeared first on Izy Hossack – Top With Cinnamon.

homemade graham crackers separated on a baking sheet

Light, crisp and sweet with a hint of spices to balance them, these graham crackers are surprisingly easy to make and very moreish!

a bowl of ingredients for making homemade graham crackers

Whenever we visit the States, my mum and I always buy a box of Graham crackers to snack on (and some to bring home to the UK!). They have such a light, airy texture to them and a strong scent of vanilla, it’s very easy to eat a lot of them in one go.

What is the UK equivalent of a graham cracker?

We don’t really have anything that is specifically like a graham cracker in the UK. In cheesecake bases where recipes indicate using graham cracker crumbs, we would typically use digestive biscuits. Digestives are slightly similar in that they are quite plain, wholegrain-y, crisp ‘biscuits’/cookies. They have a very different flavour and texture though so it’s not really the same thing (however they will do in recipes like the cheesecake base mentioned).

homemade graham cracker dough with hands holding it

What is the ‘graham’ in graham crackers?

Unlike what me and Andy joke about, ‘Graham’ is not just some dude who realllly likes crackers. It refers to the specific type of flour – graham flour- used in the crackers. It’s a fine, whole wheat flour which seems pretty hard to get hold of outside of the US. I just use a wholemeal pastry flour which has a low protein content to make sure the crackers are tender. You can’t use a wholemeal bread flour here as that will make the dough heavy.

What gives graham crackers their flavour?

In regular graham crackers, the flavour comes from honey, cinnamon and vanilla. I’ve found that the vanilla flavouring used commercially is an artificial vanilla flavouring which is particularly strong. So, if you want to mimic that specific flavour, you’ll need to get some of the clear vanilla imitation flavouring (e.g. this Wilton one). You can use a ‘real’ vanilla extract in the dough but it will taste less like the shop bought ones.

I’ve used golden syrup in these crackers instead of honey as I prefer the flavour and I like the very crisp texture you get in the end. I’ve tested them with a runny, light honey too and that works well (plus is easier to get in some parts of the world).

cutting out graham cracker dough
docking graham cracker dough with a chopstick

How are graham crackers made?

A dough is formed from dry ingredients of the whole wheat flour, cinnamon, salt, sugar and raising agents. I like to use baker’s ammonia (ammonium bicarbonate) as the raising agent as it provides the lightest, crispest texture to baked goods like this. However, you can use bicarbonate of soda as I know most people won’t have baker’s ammonia to hand! I add a lil bit of ground cardamom to the dough as well for a slightly spicy, background note.

We rub butter (or vegan butter) into the dry ingredients which coats the flour particles in fat, preventing some gluten formation once the liquids are added. That helps to give a nice ‘short’ (i.e. crumbly, snappy) texture to the crackers and prevents them becoming chewy.

Last of all, the wet ingredients – some syrup, a bit of milk and the vanilla. That’s mixed until we get a soft dough and then chilled so it gets less sticky and easier to roll out.

I like to roll the chilled disk out on a piece of baking paper so that I can get the dough really thin. I score the dough and then bake it straight on the same piece of baking paper. I also dock the dough before baking – I used a chopstick end (a la Bravetart) to get a more authentic look. You can use a fork to dock it though to speed things up! The docking helps the dough rise more evenly and become less puffy when baking. I bake the dough as one huge sheet so that as it spreads, the lines stay straight. If you cut them and bake the crackers as individual squares, the edges spread out and become less clean. This is also why I leave the uneven edges in place as the cracker bakes (plus it provides a buffer for if any of the dough around the edges darkens too much).

Once baked, you can finally snap the huge cracker along the score lines into lil squares! Pop them into an airtight container and they’ll actually stay crisp for ages – a few weeks at least.

snapping a large homemade graham cracker sheet into smaller crackers

Graham Crackers

Graham Crackers

Yield: 70-80, 5cm (2-inch) square crackers
Prep Time: 15 minutes
Cook Time: 20 minutes
Additional Time: 30 minutes
Total Time: 1 hour 5 minutes

Ingredients

  • 120g (1 cup) plain white (all-purpose) flour
  • 110g (1 cup minus 1 tbsp) wholemeal (whole wheat) pastry flour
  • 1/2 tsp bicarbonate of soda (baking soda) or bakers ammonia
  • 1/4 tsp fine table salt
  • 1 1/2 tsp ground cinnamon
  • 50g (1/4 cup) granulated sugar
  • 2 pods green cardamom
  • 70g (5 tbsp) unsalted butter or vegan butter
  • 75g (3 1/2 tbsp) golden syrup (see notes)
  • 2-3 tbsp milk or non-dairy milk (I use oat milk)
  • 1 tsp vanilla extract

Instructions

Make the dough:

  1. Combine both of the flours, the bicarb (or ammonia), salt, cinnamon and sugar in a medium bowl. Bash the cardamom pods in a pestle and mortar to break them open, push out the seeds and discard the papery skin. Grind the seeds in the pestle and mortar into a fine powder. Add this to the bowl of dry ingredients too. (If you want to make the dough in a food processor, see the recipe notes below)
  2. Cut the butter into smallish cubes and add to the bowl. Use your fingertips to rub the butter into the dry ingredients until no large lumps of butter remain and the mixture is crubmly. Add the golden syrup, milk (start with 2 tbsp for now) and vanilla extract to the bowl. Use a spoon to stir together to make a moist, soft dough. If it seems too dry, drizzle in a bit more milk and knead it in with your hands.
  3. Divide the dough in half, form into 2 balls and then flatten into disks. Place into a reusable sandwich bag and chill for at least 30 minutes so the dough can firm up.

Roll, shape & bake:

  1. Preheat the oven to 160°C fan (320°F) and grab a large cookie sheet/baking tray (I like to use one without a rim for this but a rimmed sheet is fine).
  2. Cut a piece of baking paper to the size of your baking tray. Place the baking paper on your work surface and dust with some plain flour. Take one disk of dough from the fridge and place onto the baking paper. Dust with more flour. Use a rolling pin to roll it out until the dough is about 2mm thick, dusting with flour as needed to prevent it sticking to the rolling pin.
  3. Cut into 5cm (2-inch) squares and leave them connected like this. We will bake the dough as one big sheet so that the crackers stay in a neat shape, then break them up once they're baked! Dock the crackers all over with a fork (or the small end of a chopstick if you want a more authentic look).
  4. Lift the sheet of dough up with the baking paper still underneath it, and lay onto your cookie sheet. Get them into the oven and bake for 10 minutes. Rotate the cookie sheet so that the crackers can bake evenly. Lower the oven temperature to 140°C fan (280°F) and bake for a further 10 minutes.
  5. Remove from the oven and break along the score lines into squares. Allow to cool and then transfer to an airtight container. Repeat with the remaining disk of dough as above.
  6. They will keep for a couple of weeks like this, if they start to soften just lay on a cookie sheet in an oven at 120°C fan (250°F) and bake for 5-10 minutes until crisp again.

Notes

- Make the dough in a food processor: combine the dry ingredients (as in step 1) but place them into the bowl of a food processor. Add the cubed butter and pulse together until no large pieces of butter remain. Add the syrup, milk and vanilla and blend until you get a soft dough.

- You can also use a light, runny honey in place of some/all of the golden syrup (although this won't be vegan).

- I add cardamom to the dough for a bit more of a fragrant flavour. You don't have to do this if you don't like it though.

Have you made this recipe?
I’d love to see how it went! Tag me on instagram @izyhossack and hashtag it #topwithcinnamon so I can have a look & reshare in my stories!

The post Graham Crackers (vegan option) appeared first on Izy Hossack - Top With Cinnamon.

Mini Wreath Place Cards – DIY

MINI WREATH PLACE CARDS – DIYYou may remember our very popular Rosemary Wreath Place Cards from a long time ago! Well, I have resurrected the concept and created a new version that goes perfectly with my Fall Inspired Thanksgiving Tablescape. The…

MINI WREATH PLACE CARDS – DIY
You may remember our very popular Rosemary Wreath Place Cards from a long time ago! Well, I have resurrected the concept and created a new version that goes perfectly with my Fall Inspired Thanksgiving Tablescape. These, like the Rosemary Wreath Place Cards are really easy. The great…
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