A Limited-Edition Collab Giving Back This Pride Month

Our friends at SeaVees and McConnell’s Fine Ice Creams are teaming up to celebrate Pride Month with a special collaboration that supports the Pacific Pride Foundation—and we’ve got all the details.

June is Pride Month—a time to celebrate love and ac…

Our friends at SeaVees and McConnell's Fine Ice Creams are teaming up to celebrate Pride Month with a special collaboration that supports the Pacific Pride Foundation—and we've got all the details.


June is Pride Month—a time to celebrate love and acceptance, as well as reflect on the history and progress of the LGBTQ+ rights movement, and how much work still needs to be done.

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‘High on the Hog’ & the People Preserving Black Cooking Traditions

“The story of food is also the story of who we are,” proclaims host Steven Satterfield in Netflix’s High On The Hog: How African American Cuisine Transformed America.

The new docuseries, which came out just this week, sets out to reveal the origin sto…

“The story of food is also the story of who we are,” proclaims host Steven Satterfield in Netflix’s High On The Hog: How African American Cuisine Transformed America.

The new docuseries, which came out just this week, sets out to reveal the origin stories of what we know as “American” cuisine. But this time the focus is on the people whose contributions have often been overshadowed or erased from the collective memory of American history—African Americans.

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7 Best Rosé Wine Brands—for All Kinds of Wine-Lovers

In preparation for those summer days when it’s too hot to move, much less walk to the wine shop, I like to keep at least a couple bottles of vino in the fridge at all times (and maybe a few more on the bar cart, just in case). The rest of the Food52 te…

In preparation for those summer days when it’s too hot to move, much less walk to the wine shop, I like to keep at least a couple bottles of vino in the fridge at all times (and maybe a few more on the bar cart, just in case). The rest of the Food52 team clearly thinks so, too. While I tend to be more of a light red fan, when the weather gets so warm you’re sweating at breakfast, a glass of rosé can be just the thing. And before you say “I don’t like rosé—it’s too sweet,” hold on a sec. Just because many rosé wine brands fall on the sweeter side doesn’t mean all rosés taste like melted watermelon Jolly Ranchers. Some are sweet, yes (and if wine that tastes like cotton candy is your thing, I wouldn’t dream of yucking your yum!), but other rosé wines have floral notes of ripe, red summer fruit yet stay dry and crisp on the palate; or they’re bubbly and tart; some are quite savory, even herbal in flavor. There’s a great rosé for any kind of wine-lover, I promise.

Of course, for some folks, the answer to “what’s the best rosé wine brand?” is “any one that’s made into frosé,” but other people have more specific bottles in mind. Here are the seven best rosé wine brands, according to team Food52.

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Betcha Didn’t Know All of These Were Stone Fruits

Whether you’re wandering around in a farmers market or passing through a section of the grocery store, odds are you’ve seen the term “stone fruit” tossed around near the peaches and plums. You put your keen mind to the task and gather that the term is …

Whether you’re wandering around in a farmers market or passing through a section of the grocery store, odds are you’ve seen the term “stone fruit” tossed around near the peaches and plums. You put your keen mind to the task and gather that the term is referencing a fruit (great start) with a, well, stone-like pit. Nailed it! But is there more to the concept? What is a stone fruit, exactly?

What is a stone fruit?

We’ve already gone over the obvious: Stone fruits are those with pits in the center. Officially, they’re fruits with a fleshy exterior known as the mesocarp (covered with a skin, or exocarp) that encases a stone or pit (the shell of which is a hardened endocarp with a seed inside). Also known as drupes, this category includes peaches, plums, cherries, nectarines, apricots, and pluots.

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The 6 Best Podcasts We’ve Kept on Rotation in 2021

I have been taking a lot of walks lately. Homebound (with an infant!) during a pandemic, there aren’t a whole lot of places one can go. So when it’s time for a change of scenery—which is pretty much daily—I load up the stroller, queue up a podcast, gra…

I have been taking a lot of walks lately. Homebound (with an infant!) during a pandemic, there aren’t a whole lot of places one can go. So when it’s time for a change of scenery—which is pretty much daily—I load up the stroller, queue up a podcast, grab my earbuds, and off we go. I’ve zig-zagged my Atlanta neighborhood while listening to a poet talk about her favorite overalls, two journalists explain Y2K, and a comedian deconstruct the story of the Hipster Grifter, just to name a few. Here are some of the podcasts that have soundtracked my days recently.


6 Best Podcasts of 2021

1. Maintenance Phase

Michael Hobbes (co-host of another beloved podcast, You’re Wrong About) and Aubrey Gordon (Your Fat Friend) put the snake oil of wellness culture under their critical magnifying glass, tackling everything from the Master Cleanse to Moon Juice to, yep, actual snake oil. I love a good debunking, but I also love the way these two bring empathy and compassion (alongside humor and some pretty rigorous research) into these conversations.

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15 Costco Steals for Picnics, BBQs & Beach Days

It’s happening, friends! It’s really happening. Summer is upon us, and as long as we stay smart and follow the most up-to-date CDC rules, it looks like we are going to be able to enjoy the warm weather with our friends and family in familiar and welcom…

It’s happening, friends! It’s really happening. Summer is upon us, and as long as we stay smart and follow the most up-to-date CDC rules, it looks like we are going to be able to enjoy the warm weather with our friends and family in familiar and welcome ways.

This also means it’s time to stock up on the things that make these outdoor gatherings the most successful (and delicious!). A leisurely meandering around a Costco in Brookfield, Connecticut, resulted in a laundry list of items that we all might consider for our upcoming get-togethers and day trips. There are treats to grill and glug, tools to keep us cool, and gadgets to make entertaining easier. Here are 15 Costco summer essentials I’ve got my eye on.

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A 1930s Whipping Cream Cake Is the Internet’s Latest Favorite Recipe

Every few weeks, people on the internet obsess over a recipe, and it spreads like wildfire. The source is often social media, frequently Instagram and TikTok, but more and more, Reddit seems to be the source. For most, Reddit is a never-ending list of …

Every few weeks, people on the internet obsess over a recipe, and it spreads like wildfire. The source is often social media, frequently Instagram and TikTok, but more and more, Reddit seems to be the source. For most, Reddit is a never-ending list of community-driven forums on everything from news and hobbies to fandom and Bitcoin advice. But it’s also an increasingly popular platform for recipe discovery, especially in the subreddit channel /Old_Recipes. This page, with more than 250,000 followers, has come to be a full-blown digital archive of everything from generations-old heirloom recipes to magazine clippings from decades past. It’s quickly grown to be one of the more exciting cooking resources on the internet, with an engaged community breathing new life into each recipe. Some recipes remain one-hit wonders, while others gain traction and only pick up speed from there. Recipes spanning from Murder Cookies to Armenian Perok Cake to Nana’s Devil’s Food Cake have all gone viral, well beyond Reddit. Not only do these get their 15 minutes of fame on the wider internet, they’re frequently shared on the /Old_Recipes forum months after they were originally shared. The latest recipe to go viral, a dense buttery Bundt called Whipping Cream Cake, is no exception. What is it about such a recipe that peaks the internet’s interest, rocketing many to fame, while others stay stuck in the past?

The Sweet Stuff

The Whipping Cream Cake first appeared on the forum in a post by user Jamie_of_house_m, who wrote that it is her go-to birthday cake. It hails from her husband’s grandmother’s cookbook, a relic from an Iowan town’s centennial anniversary in 1979. (Similar recipes date back even earlier: the YouTube channel Glen And Friends Cooking shared a video making a whipped cream cake from a North Dakota county’s community cookbook from 1936.) This cake is the epitome of the Reddit forum’s mission: uncovering the most obscure recipes that have stood the test of time, wedging their ways into our traditions, one tattered, scribbled-on notecard as a time.

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This Podcast Is An Audible Dinner Party—& Everyone’s Invited

In the world of podcasts, you’ve got your culture talk shows, you’ve got your music roundups, you’ve got your food pods… But Food52’s Counterjam is here to remind us that genre is a construct. A “musical dive into the cultural identities behind the p…

In the world of podcasts, you’ve got your culture talk shows, you’ve got your music roundups, you’ve got your food pods... But Food52’s Counterjam is here to remind us that genre is a construct. A “musical dive into the cultural identities behind the plate,” the show mixes components of culture into holistic conversations about identity and belonging.

The host Peter J. Kim kicks off the season recalling his own experience as a Korean-American kid growing up in rural Illinois, straddling two cultures. Set to music by some of Kim’s favorite off-the-radar artists (don’t sleep on the synthpop throwback from the Korean-American singer-songwriter CLARA), Kim interviews the chef Roy Choi and the comedian Margaret Cho about the contents their refrigerators past and present—kimchi, Hamburger Helper, K-beauty prpoducts, peanut butter jars filled with deer blood—and how their parents’ cooking informed their relationships with food and with people.

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10 TikTok Recipes Worth Trying (Trust Us—We Did)

2021 has been the year that TikTok took over food media. As people spent more time in the kitchen and on their phones, lockdown season one provided the ideal springboard for TikTok to catapult itself to the upper echelons of ubiquity. (Now before you g…

2021 has been the year that TikTok took over food media. As people spent more time in the kitchen and on their phones, lockdown season one provided the ideal springboard for TikTok to catapult itself to the upper echelons of ubiquity. (Now before you go calling me a grandpa, I know the app has been around for a few years now, but it wasn’t until recently that I started to feel its effects on a seismic level.)

Around March of last year, the viral trends started to pour in. First there was dalgona coffee and pancake cereal. These kitchen adventures filled our newly found free time with brief, shareable moments of experimentation.

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How Iceberg Lettuce Wedged Its Way Into American Culture

The easiest way to core iceberg lettuce is to firmly whack the head, core side down, against the kitchen counter. The force dislocates the core from the tight leaf structure, and, with a quick twist, it pops right out.

America’s relationship with iceb…

The easiest way to core iceberg lettuce is to firmly whack the head, core side down, against the kitchen counter. The force dislocates the core from the tight leaf structure, and, with a quick twist, it pops right out.

America’s relationship with iceberg lettuce may have once been this simple—and satisfying—but in recent years, iceberg’s reputation has wilted under nutritional and environmental scrutiny. On the other hand, iceberg recipes continue to pop up online and in cookbooks; they’re handed down, swapped, and treasured. And at some point, iceberg lettuce became a signifier of taste, class, and values: deficient for some, yet irreplaceable for others.

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