There’s a Major Recall of Salad Mixes Right Now

I hate to be the bearer of bad news but, there’s been another recall. The good news is that all of these recalls are proof that the right systems are in place to detect recalls and alert consumers. The bad news is, this time, it affects Dole salad mixe…

I hate to be the bearer of bad news but, there’s been another recall. The good news is that all of these recalls are proof that the right systems are in place to detect recalls and alert consumers. The bad news is, this time, it affects Dole salad mixes. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reports that there is not one, but two, separate Listeria outbreaks linked to packaged salad mixes, one of which includes Dole and the other Fresh Express. So far, there have been 17 illnesses reported, 12 hospitalizations, and two deaths across 13 different states.

The packaged salad mixes were sold under multiple Dole branded and private labels including Ahold, Dole, Kroger, Lidl, Little Salad Bar, Marketside, Naturally Better, Nature’s Promise, and Simply Nature. The salads include mixed greens, garden salads, Caesar kits, and other types of salads packaged in bags and clamshells. The salads all have “best if used by” dates ranging from November 30th, 2021 through January 8th, 2022. The product lot code begins with the letter “N” or “Y,” which is listed in the upper right-hand corner of the package.

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A Whopping 28,000 Pounds of Ground Beef Just Got Recalled

If the USDA’s New Year’s resolution was to recall less meat, they’ve already fallen off the wagon. It’s happened to the best of us, and when it’s in the name of public safety, I can’t blame them. In the last 12 hours, the USDA announced a recall of mor…

If the USDA’s New Year’s resolution was to recall less meat, they’ve already fallen off the wagon. It’s happened to the best of us, and when it’s in the name of public safety, I can’t blame them. In the last 12 hours, the USDA announced a recall of more than 28,000 pounds of ground beef. Oregon-based Interstate Meat Distributors is recalling approximately 28,356 pounds of ground beef products (give or take) that may be contaminated with E. coli O157:H7, which refers to a particularly nasty strain of E. coli.

The raw ground beef was produced on December 20, 2021 and was distributed to retail locations including Albertsons, Kroger, Walmart, and WinCo in Arizona, California, Nevada, Oregon, Utah, Washington, and Wyoming.

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Two Million Pounds of Pork Have Been Recalled Across the U.S.

Not to be dramatic, but you probably shouldn’t serve a spiral-glazed ham for Christmas this year. Not smoked ham either, nor an applewood smoked ham, not even a fully cooked spiral sliced honey ham, and nope, not a boneless ham with water added. Those …

Not to be dramatic, but you probably shouldn’t serve a spiral-glazed ham for Christmas this year. Not smoked ham either, nor an applewood smoked ham, not even a fully cooked spiral sliced honey ham, and nope, not a boneless ham with water added. Those are just a few of the pork products that are being recalled all across the country, due to listeria contamination. The USDA has announced one of the most massive recalls in recent history—it includes more than two million pounds of pork, including two dozen types of ham and multiple pepperoni products.

The pork was distributed, and subsequently recalled, by Alexander & Hornung, a unit of Perdue Premium Meat Company based in Michigan. The products made their way onto the shelves of grocery stores including Big Y and Whole Foods.

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There’s a Huge Coca-Cola Recall—Here’s What to Know

We talk about recalls a lot. But generally the recalls we report on address salmonella, E. coli, and listeria contamination in raw produce and meat. Not today. The Coca-Cola Company has announced a recall of three different Minute-Maid products due to …

We talk about recalls a lot. But generally the recalls we report on address salmonella, E. coli, and listeria contamination in raw produce and meat. Not today. The Coca-Cola Company has announced a recall of three different Minute-Maid products due to potential contamination of metal bolts or washers. Before you stock your wet bar for an upcoming holiday party, look out for these beverages: Minute Maid Berry Punch, Strawberry Lemonade, and Fruit Punch in 59-ounce cartons. Additionally, Sprite 12-ounce cans and Coca-Cola 12-ounce cans were voluntarily recalled; each has date code AUG 1522 WM B.

The recalled products, which have an expiration date in 2022, were distributed to eight states including Connecticut, Maine, Maryland, New Jersey, New York, North Carolina, Pennsylvania, and Virginia. The fact that the products are not yet expired means thousands of people may still have them on their shelves or tucked away in their refrigerators.

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The No-Browning Way to Store Peeled Potatoes

One of the most revelatory things I learned while working as a line cook was that restaurant food is, essentially, very good reheated leftovers. Sure, proteins are seared on the spot and crème brûlée is torched to order, but everything else—risotto, pasta, green beans, soups—are made hours and days in advance. As soon as an order is fired (meaning the server tells the kitchen staff to start preparing the salads and steak tartare for table 11), everything is reheated in skillets and sizzler platters in the oven. What does this have to do with potatoes? Right. Those are prepared way in advance too.

Most mornings on the job, I was tasked with peeling pounds and pounds of russets for creamy potatoes. I would then cut the spuds with the largest restaurant-provided chef’s knife I could find and transfer them to a 22-quart container, cover them in water, and store the incredibly heavy container in the refrigerator. At that point, they would hang out, uncovered, for a few days until we were running low on mashed potatoes or hand cut French fries and it was time to make more.

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One of the most revelatory things I learned while working as a line cook was that restaurant food is, essentially, very good reheated leftovers. Sure, proteins are seared on the spot and crème brûlée is torched to order, but everything else—risotto, pasta, green beans, soups—are made hours and days in advance. As soon as an order is fired (meaning the server tells the kitchen staff to start preparing the salads and steak tartare for table 11), everything is reheated in skillets and sizzler platters in the oven. What does this have to do with potatoes? Right. Those are prepared way in advance too.

Most mornings on the job, I was tasked with peeling pounds and pounds of russets for creamy potatoes. I would then cut the spuds with the largest restaurant-provided chef’s knife I could find and transfer them to a 22-quart container, cover them in water, and store the incredibly heavy container in the refrigerator. At that point, they would hang out, uncovered, for a few days until we were running low on mashed potatoes or hand cut French fries and it was time to make more.

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The FDA Is Investigating a Major E. Coli Outbreak in Spinach

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is investigating a major outbreak of E. coli in raw spinach, just one week before Thanksgiving, according to a press announcement shared by the FDA on November 16th, 2021. The report reveals that there have been a…

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is investigating a major outbreak of E. coli in raw spinach, just one week before Thanksgiving, according to a press announcement shared by the FDA on November 16th, 2021. The report reveals that there have been a total of 10 illnesses linked to the E. coli outbreak across seven different states including Iowa, Indiana, Michigan, Minnesota, Montana, Ohio, and South Dakota. The infections reportedly occurred between October 15th and October 27th, and five people reported eating spinach one week before becoming sick. At least one person reported eating Josie’s Organics brand of raw spinach as the specific cause.

A bit on the outbreak from the FDA itself:

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Wait, So Does Cooking Actually Kill Salmonella?

Here at Food52, I have covered pop culture phenomena like Ted Lasso and The Great British Bake Off. I have shared tips for food and produce storage, written dozens of delicious recipe roundups, and professed my love to Stanley Tucci. But I’ve also writ…

Here at Food52, I have covered pop culture phenomena like Ted Lasso and The Great British Bake Off. I have shared tips for food and produce storage, written dozens of delicious recipe roundups, and professed my love to Stanley Tucci. But I’ve also written about lots and lots of recalls due to salmonella, E.coli, and listeria outbreaks. And that’s because it seems like every week, something new is being recalled. I’ve researched why there are so many salmonella outbreaks in products such as hummus, raw onions, and carrots, but there’s still one question that remains: Does cooking kill salmonella?

“The short answer is yes, cooking will kill salmonella, but it has to be the right type of cooking,” says Trevor Craig, corporate director of technical consulting for Microbac Laboratories. This doesn’t mean that if you knowingly have chicken breasts that have been recalled you should cook with them anyway. You should discard them immediately or return them to the place of purchase. But lots of food may contain trace amounts of salmonella or other foodborne pathogens—no recall needed. In order to ensure that you kill off any and all bacteria before consuming meat, poultry, or even vegetables, you need to cook it thoroughly.

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Raw Onions Are Linked to a Salmonella Outbreak in 37 States

Stop what you’re doing and check your onions. Then, depending on what you see—chuck ’em, compost ’em, whatever you need to do! There is a massive (and I mean, massive) outbreak of salmonella in raw onions that has already impacted 37 states in the U.S….

Stop what you’re doing and check your onions. Then, depending on what you see—chuck ’em, compost ’em, whatever you need to do! There is a massive (and I mean, massive) outbreak of salmonella in raw onions that has already impacted 37 states in the U.S. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, consumers should refrain from buying or eating any whole fresh red, white, or yellow onions if they were imported from Chihuahua, Mexico and distributed by ProSource Inc. So how do you know if your onions are impacted? If you purchased a bag of onions (generally sold in three- or five-pound quanties), there should be a tag that tells you where the onions were grown and which company distributed them. If they were grown in the U.S., they're safe (for now). However, if the label says that they were grown in Chihuahua, Mexico, get rid of 'em. Furthermore, if you only purchased one or two onions from a large grocery store display, there is no easy way to know where they're from. In that case, it's safest to assume they're contaminated.

Per the CDC’s food safety alert, which was announced on Wednesday, October 20th, more than 600 people have experienced food poisoning after consuming the onions and over 100 people have been hospitalized. At this time, the onions have not been formally recalled and there have been no deaths.

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There’s a Major Recall on Ground Turkey

Thanksgiving is less than six weeks away, but there’s already cause for concern over this year’s turkey supply. Butterball has issued a recall of more than 14,000 pounds of ground turkey product because it is suspected to be contaminated with blue plastic. According to Butterball, the ground turkey was distributed to Kroger and BJ’s grocery stores. No other Butterball turkey products are affected by this recall and the brand is cooperating with the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) to complete a thorough investigation to confirm the safety of the rest of their products.

According to the USDA, the affected ground turkey products include 2.5-lb. trays containing “farm to family Butterball all-natural Ground Turkey” with the case code 50211271, a sell or freeze by date of 10/18/2021, and timestamps from 2123 through 2302 printed on the packaging; and a three-pound tray containing “Kroger Ground Turkey” with the case code 50211271, a sell or freeze by date of 10/17/2021, and timestamps from 2314 through 2351 printed on the packaging.

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Thanksgiving is less than six weeks away, but there’s already cause for concern over this year’s turkey supply. Butterball has issued a recall of more than 14,000 pounds of ground turkey product because it is suspected to be contaminated with blue plastic. According to Butterball, the ground turkey was distributed to Kroger and BJ’s grocery stores. No other Butterball turkey products are affected by this recall and the brand is cooperating with the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) to complete a thorough investigation to confirm the safety of the rest of their products.

According to the USDA, the affected ground turkey products include 2.5-lb. trays containing “farm to family Butterball all-natural Ground Turkey'' with the case code 50211271, a sell or freeze by date of 10/18/2021, and timestamps from 2123 through 2302 printed on the packaging; and a three-pound tray containing “Kroger Ground Turkey'' with the case code 50211271, a sell or freeze by date of 10/17/2021, and timestamps from 2314 through 2351 printed on the packaging.

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Simple Mills Has Recalled Its Popular Sea Salt Crackers

Before you start assembling a board of cheese, charcuterie, and crackers for happy hour tonight, check your pantry if you have a milk allergy: Simple Mills, a popular producer of gluten-free snacks, has issued a voluntary recall of its Fine Ground Sea Salt Almond Flour Crackers. According to the brand, a select number of boxes of the sea salt crackers were incorrectly packed with bags of Farmhouse Cheddar Almond Flour Crackers. The ingredient panel on the Fine Ground Sea Salt Almond Flour Cracker boxes does not disclose milk, which is a major health concern for people who have an allergy or sensitivity to dairy. Milk is a key ingredient in the brand’s cheddar crackers. At this time, there are no other known health or safety risks associated with consuming the Farmhouse Cheddar crackers—so if you’re OK with dairy, it should be safe to eat the crackers. “We know this type of news can be concerning, so as a valued customer we want to make sure you have all the facts,” said the brand in their alert.

The product lot impacted by the recall includes 4.25-ounce boxes with UPC number 856069005131. The best-by dates read February 12, 2022, February 13, 2022, February 14, 2022, and February 15, 2022. The boxes may have been sold as individual boxes or part of a 3- or 6-pack from wholesale grocery stores, direct delivery services, and e-commerce. Impacted recallers include Walmart, Target, Kroger, Publix, and Sprouts. This is the only Simple Mills product that is subject to the current recall. Impacted retailers have been notified of the recall and are in the process of removing the cracker boxes from their warehouses, distribution centers, and store shelves.

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Before you start assembling a board of cheese, charcuterie, and crackers for happy hour tonight, check your pantry if you have a milk allergy: Simple Mills, a popular producer of gluten-free snacks, has issued a voluntary recall of its Fine Ground Sea Salt Almond Flour Crackers. According to the brand, a select number of boxes of the sea salt crackers were incorrectly packed with bags of Farmhouse Cheddar Almond Flour Crackers. The ingredient panel on the Fine Ground Sea Salt Almond Flour Cracker boxes does not disclose milk, which is a major health concern for people who have an allergy or sensitivity to dairy. Milk is a key ingredient in the brand’s cheddar crackers. At this time, there are no other known health or safety risks associated with consuming the Farmhouse Cheddar crackers—so if you’re OK with dairy, it should be safe to eat the crackers. “We know this type of news can be concerning, so as a valued customer we want to make sure you have all the facts,” said the brand in their alert.

The product lot impacted by the recall includes 4.25-ounce boxes with UPC number 856069005131. The best-by dates read February 12, 2022, February 13, 2022, February 14, 2022, and February 15, 2022. The boxes may have been sold as individual boxes or part of a 3- or 6-pack from wholesale grocery stores, direct delivery services, and e-commerce. Impacted recallers include Walmart, Target, Kroger, Publix, and Sprouts. This is the only Simple Mills product that is subject to the current recall. Impacted retailers have been notified of the recall and are in the process of removing the cracker boxes from their warehouses, distribution centers, and store shelves.

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