Turkey and Wild Rice Soup

Turkey and Wild Rice Soup is a great way to use up those Thanksgiving leftovers, plus the leftovers are great so it’s the perfect meal prep!

The post Turkey and Wild Rice Soup appeared first on Budget Bytes.

Have you eaten all of your Thanksgiving leftovers yet?? If not, here’s an amazing soup that you can make with that leftover turkey, and any leftover vegetables you may have laying around from all that Thanksgiving prep a few days ago. This Turkey and Wild Rice Soup is rich, flavorful, and just packed with goodies. Plus, it’s one of those soups that tastes even better the next day, so make a pot of this and you’ll be eating GOOD for the next few days!

Overhead view of a bowl of turkey and wild rice soup on a wood surface.

What’s in Turkey and WIld RIce Soup

This recipe is actually based on the filling for my chicken pot pie recipe, but I used leftover Thanksgiving turkey instead and made it a little thinner to be more soup-like.

It starts with a basic medley of vegetables (onion, garlic, carrot, celery, and mushrooms) sautéed until tender, then we add a combination of butter and flour that will help thicken the soup and give it body. Next, we add vegetable broth, herbs, and the wild rice blend, and simmer until the rice is tender. Finally, we add in the cooked chopped turkey, heat through, then add a dose of cream for a rich finish. 👌 Perfect!

Do I Have to Use Turkey?

This recipe is quite flexible, so if you want to make it any other time of the year other than after Thanksgiving, simply swap out the cooked turkey with some chopped rotisserie chicken! Still super delish and hearty!

Overhead view of turkey and wild rice soup in the pot with a ladle.

What Kind of Rice to Use

For this soup, you’ll want to use a wild rice blend. While you can use wild rice by itself, I find that using a blend of different rices adds more texture and color to the bowl and the rice blends tend to be more affordable than wild rice by itself. I used Lundberg’s Wild Blend, but you can sometimes find generic store versions of this, depending on where you shop (last year ALDI had some). And, since rice is shelf stable, you can save the leftovers to use in other recipes, rather than worrying about it going to waste.

How to Store Leftovers

Refrigerate this soup just after cooking so that it cools quickly. Even better yet, divide it into single servings for faster cooling and easier serving and reheating later. Chill completely in the refrigerator overnight, then, if desired, transfer it to the freezer for longer storage. The soup can be reheated in the microwave or in a pot on the stove over medium-low, stirring often, until hot.

Close up side view of a bowl of turkey and wild rice soup.
Overhead view of a bowl of turkey and wild rice soup.
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Turkey and Wild Rice Soup

Turkey and Wild Rice Soup is a great way to use up those Thanksgiving leftovers, plus the leftovers are great so it's the perfect meal prep!
Course Dinner, Lunch, Main Course, Soup
Cuisine American
Total Cost $8.94 recipe / $2.24 serving
Prep Time 15 minutes
Cook Time 1 hour
Total Time 1 hour 15 minutes
Servings 4 1.75 cups each
Calories 472kcal

Equipment

Ingredients

  • 1 yellow onion $0.37
  • 2 carrots $0.29
  • 3 ribs celery $0.32
  • 2 cloves garlic $0.16
  • 5 Tbsp butter, divided $0.48
  • 8 oz. mushrooms $1.79
  • 4 Tbsp all-purpose flour $0.06
  • 1/2 cup wild rice blend $1.20
  • 1/2 tsp dried thyme $0.05
  • 1/2 tsp rubbed sage $0.05
  • 1/4 tsp freshly cracked black pepper $0.02
  • 4 cups vegetable broth $0.47
  • 2 cups chopped cooked turkey $3.11
  • 1/3 cup heavy cream $0.55
  • 1/2 tsp salt (or to taste) $0.02

Instructions

  • Dice the onion, slice the carrots and celery, and mince the garlic. Add the onion, carrot, celery, and garlic to a large soup pot with 1 Tbsp butter and sauté over medium heat until the onions are soft.
  • While the vegetables are sautéing, slice the mushrooms. Add the mushrooms to the pot and continue to sauté until the mushrooms are soft.
  • Add the flour and remaining 4 Tbsp butter to the pot. Continue to stir and cook for about one minute more.
  • Add the wild rice, thyme, sage, pepper, and broth to the pot. Stir until all of the flour and butter mixture has dissolved off the vegetables and the bottom of the pot.
  • Place a lid on the pot, turn the heat up to medium-high, and bring the soup up to a boil. Once boiling, turn the heat down to medium-low and let the soup simmer for about 40 minutes, stirring occasionally, or until the rice is tender.
  • Once the rice is tender, add the chopped turkey. Stir to combine and heat through.
  • Stir in the heavy cream, then taste the soup and season with about ½ tsp salt, or to your liking. Enjoy hot with bread for dipping!

See how we calculate recipe costs here.

Nutrition

Serving: 1.75cups | Calories: 472kcal | Carbohydrates: 36g | Protein: 24g | Fat: 27g | Sodium: 1451mg | Fiber: 4g
Close up of a ladle full of turkey and wild rice soup over the pot.

How to Make Turkey and wild rice soup – Step by Step Photos

Carrot, onion, celery, and garlic in the soup pot.

Dice one yellow onion, slice 2 carrots, slice 3 ribs of celery, and mince two cloves of garlic. Add the onion, carrot, celery, and garlic to a large soup pot with 1 Tbsp butter. Sauté over medium heat until the onions are soft.

Sliced mushrooms added to the pot.

While the vegetables are sautéing, slice 8 oz. mushrooms. Add them to the pot and continue to sauté until the mushrooms have softened.

Butter and flour added to the pot.

Add 4 Tbsp butter and ¼ cup flour to the pot. Continue to stir and cook for about one minute more. The flour and butter will form a paste that will coat the vegetables, that is okay.

Wild rice blend and herbs added to the pot.

Add ½ tsp dried thyme, ½ tsp rubbed sage, ¼ tsp pepper, and ½ cup wild rice blend to the pot.

Vegetable broth being poured into the pot.

Add 4 cups of vegetable broth. Stir to combine and dissolve all of the flour and butter off of the vegetables and the bottom of the pot.

Simmered soup in the pot.

Place a lid on the pot, turn the heat up to medium-high, and allow the soup to come to a boil. Once boiling, turn the heat down to medium-low and let it simmer for about 40 minutes, stirring occasionally, or until the wild rice is tender.

Chopped turkey being poured into the pot.

Once the rice is tender, add 2 cups of chopped cooked turkey (or chicken) and stir to combine. Allow the turkey to heat through in the soup.

Cream being stirred into the soup.

Finally, to make the soup extra lush, stir in a ⅓ cup heavy cream.

Finished soup in the pot with a spoon.

Taste the soup and add salt to your liking (I added ½ tsp). Keep in mind that adding a little salt really helps the different flavors pop!

Finished pot of turkey and wild rice soup seen from above.

Serve the Turkey and Wild Rice Soup hot with some hearty bread for dipping!

The post Turkey and Wild Rice Soup appeared first on Budget Bytes.

Your Thanksgiving Turkey Might Be Twice As Expensive This Year

A looming turkey shortage coupled with rising inflation means that your Thanksgiving turkey is going to be hard to find and really pricey this year. Not only have food costs continued to creep up at an alarming rate thanks to inflation, turkey supplies are particularly tight thanks to a decision back in 2019 by turkey producers to cut back on the number of birds they raise after the price of turkey crashed. All this has been exacerbated by the ravages of avian flu, which killed 3.6 percent of the nation’s turkeys this year, reducing the number of birds available to purchase in the grocery store further, according to The New York Times.

What that means is that prices for turkey are going to be a lot higher than they were last year—in fact they could be as much as double. And it also means you might want to do your Thanksgiving preparations well in advance. LIke, yes, right now. “I tell people if they are going to buy one of our turkeys, if they see one in the store they better pick it up and put it in the freezer,” poultry producer Greg Gunthrop told The New York Times. He added that “I’ve never seen anything as crazy as the turkey market right now.”

Read More >>

A looming turkey shortage coupled with rising inflation means that your Thanksgiving turkey is going to be hard to find and really pricey this year. Not only have food costs continued to creep up at an alarming rate thanks to inflation, turkey supplies are particularly tight thanks to a decision back in 2019 by turkey producers to cut back on the number of birds they raise after the price of turkey crashed. All this has been exacerbated by the ravages of avian flu, which killed 3.6 percent of the nation’s turkeys this year, reducing the number of birds available to purchase in the grocery store further, according to The New York Times.

What that means is that prices for turkey are going to be a lot higher than they were last year—in fact they could be as much as double. And it also means you might want to do your Thanksgiving preparations well in advance. LIke, yes, right now. “I tell people if they are going to buy one of our turkeys, if they see one in the store they better pick it up and put it in the freezer,” poultry producer Greg Gunthrop told The New York Times. He added that “I’ve never seen anything as crazy as the turkey market right now.”

Read More >>

Chicken Pot Pie

Chicken Pot Pie is the ultimate comfort food, and this is the VERY best chicken pot pie recipe out there. Trust me. It gets rave reviews every single time. Your friends and family will LOVE it. The homemade crust is buttery, flaky, and tender and easy …

Chicken Pot Pie is the ultimate comfort food, and this is the VERY best chicken pot pie recipe out there. Trust me. It gets rave reviews every single time. Your friends and family will LOVE it. The homemade crust is buttery, flaky, and tender and easy to make. It will be your new favorite crust…

turkey pesto meatballs and orecchiette

As long as we are a full six days before fall begins, I am allowed to sneak in one more zucchini recipe. It would be right there in my contract, had I one, above the expectation of ironed shoelaces and below that of a daily slice of chocolate …

As long as we are a full six days before fall begins, I am allowed to sneak in one more zucchini recipe. It would be right there in my contract, had I one, above the expectation of ironed shoelaces and below that of a daily slice of chocolate biscuit cake. I’d actually intended this recipe for July (and the eggplant involtini for August). But July was so hot, and August wasn’t much better; I couldn’t bring myself to publish recipes that require oven time, so I waited for a better moment to arrive. Our patience has been rewarded; this brothy, late summer-y bowl of pasta and meatballs is absolutely perfect for right now, with the kind of sunny warm days that require a morning and evening cardigan — i.e. the very best weather on this earth, full stop.

turkey and pestoready to roastzucchiniseasoned and ready to roastsheet panroastedroastedmixed

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Pesto “Parmesan” Turkey Meatballs (Dairy & Egg-Free!)

These turkey meatballs? They’re the real deal, friends! Crispy on the outside, tender on the inside, and super flavorful thanks to dairy-free pesto and “parmesan”! Plus, they’re simple to make (just 9 ingredients) and freezer-friendly. OH yes, winners …

Pesto “Parmesan” Turkey Meatballs (Dairy & Egg-Free!)

These turkey meatballs? They’re the real deal, friends! Crispy on the outside, tender on the inside, and super flavorful thanks to dairy-free pesto and “parmesan”! Plus, they’re simple to make (just 9 ingredients) and freezer-friendly. OH yes, winners all around!

They’re perfect for meal prep and suitable for our friends who are sensitive to dairy, gluten, or eggs.

Pesto “Parmesan” Turkey Meatballs (Dairy & Egg-Free!) from Minimalist Baker →

The Thanksgiving Leftovers Hack We’ll Never Skip

Thanksgiving is over. You’ve packed up all the leftovers you couldn’t eat or give away, and now the second marathon begins: how to turn it all into something you want to eat again. If you’ve roasted a turkey (or chicken) before, odds are you know to sa…

Thanksgiving is over. You’ve packed up all the leftovers you couldn’t eat or give away, and now the second marathon begins: how to turn it all into something you want to eat again. If you’ve roasted a turkey (or chicken) before, odds are you know to save that carcass to use as the base for stock.

But when it comes to the most flavorful stock, the kind that you’d be happy to sip on straight when you just can’t get it up to make soup, there’s one thing you simply must do. Before making stock, you’ll need to roast the turkey carcass.

Read More >>

Sour cream turkey enchiladas

—————————————————— Thank you for reading! This is a premium post available to subscribers only. While most of the site is open to all,…
Source

------------------------------------------------------ Thank you for reading! This is a premium post available to subscribers only. While most of the site is open to all,…

Source

Leftover Stuffing Muffins

Use up your Thanksgiving leftovers in these customizable savory Leftover Stuffing Muffins. The perfect grab-and-go breakfast!

The post Leftover Stuffing Muffins appeared first on Budget Bytes.

We’re all about reducing food waste over here at Budget Bytes, so I want to make sure you’ve got plenty of options for enjoying your Thanksgiving leftovers later this week! These Leftover Stuffing Muffins have been a reader favorite since they were posted back in 2014, and since I made them again myself last week I decided to give the photos a little facelift. The recipe is the same as always, simple, delicious, and portable. ;) These tasty little savory muffins make a great grab-n-go breakfast!

Originally posted 11/29/2014, updated 11/23/2021.

close up overhead shot of stuffing muffins on a cooling rack

What is a Stuffing Muffin?

Okay, these are basically like those little egg bites that you can get at Starbucks, but with leftover stuffing added into the mix. In addition to the eggs and stuffing, I also added leftover turkey and spinach. So it’s like little single-serving baked eggs with meat, vegetables, and stuffing. Super tasty, super portable, and the perfect make-ahead breakfast!

Choose Your Ingredients

These great little muffins are a super flexible way to combine your Thanksgiving leftovers into a “new” meal and avoid Thanksgiving burnout. The bulk of this recipe is leftover stuffing (dressing), but you can add a variety of other ingredients into the mix and make them your own. Here are some other ingredients that would taste awesome in these Leftover Stuffing Muffins:

  • Chopped broccoli
  • Chopped ham
  • Roasted sweet potatoes or butternut squash
  • Chopped green beans
  • Mushrooms
  • Corn
  • Cheese (cheddar, brie, mozzarella, feta, goat)

Whatever you decide to add, make sure it’s chopped into small pieces!

Bake it as a Casserole

While I haven’t done this yet, you could definitely bake this as a breakfast casserole, just like a strata. This amount of ingredients would probably fit an an 8×8 or 9×9-inch casserole dish. You’ll need to bake it until the center reaches an internal temperature of 160ºF.

How Long Do They Last?

You’ll want to either freeze or eat these leftover stuffing muffins within a few days, assuming you made them the day after Thanksgiving. Unfortunately, there’s no exact lifespan of dishes like this because the freshness and safety of leftovers can depend on so many different things, like how long the ingredients stayed at room temperature before they were refrigerated, the conditions within your refrigerator, and how quickly they were able to cool down once inside the refrigerator. When in doubt, play it safe!

close up of a stuffing muffin that has been bitten into
Close up of leftover stuffing muffins on a cooling rack

Leftover Stuffing Muffins

Use up your Thanksgiving leftovers in these customizable savory Leftover Stuffing Muffins. The perfect grab-and-go breakfast!
Prep Time 15 minutes
Cook Time 25 minutes
Total Time 40 minutes
Servings 12 muffins
Calories 143kcal
Author Beth – Budget Bytes

Ingredients

  • 2 tsp butter (for greasing the muffin tin)
  • 3 cups prepared stuffing or dressing
  • 1 cup chopped turkey or ham
  • 1/4 lb. frozen spinach, thawed and squeezed
  • 6 large eggs
  • 2 Tbsp milk
  • 1/4 tsp salt
  • 1/4 tsp Freshly cracked pepper

Instructions

  • Preheat the oven to 375 degrees. Grease a muffin tin with butter, oil, or non-stick spray. Thaw and squeeze the spinach dry.
  • Add the stuffing, turkey, and spinach to a bowl, then stir gently to combine without breaking up the stuffing too much.
  • Divide the stuffing mixture between all 12 wells of the muffin tin. Leave the stuffing loosely packed in the cups so that the egg mixture can fill in around the stuffing.
  • In a medium bowl, whisk together the eggs, milk, salt, and pepper. Divide the egg mixture among the 12 wells, starting with 2 Tbsp per muffin and then adding a little bit more until all of the egg mixture has been used. The egg will not fully cover the stuffing, it will puff up as it bakes.
  • Bake the muffins for 25-30 minutes or until golden brown and crispy on the top. Allow the muffins to cool slightly, then run a knife around the edges to loosen and remove each muffin. Serve warm.

Nutrition

Serving: 1muffin | Calories: 143kcal | Carbohydrates: 12g | Protein: 7g | Fat: 7g | Sodium: 347mg | Fiber: 2g

How to Make Leftover Stuffing Muffins – Step by Step Photos

Greased muffin tin

Start by preheating the oven to 375ºF. Grease a muffin tin with butter, oil, or non-stick spray.

Stuffing muffin ingredients in a bowl, not mixed

First, mix together your solid ingredients. This is where you can get creative. I used 3 cups of leftover herb stuffing, 1 cup of chopped Thanksgiving turkey, and 1/4 lb. of frozen spinach (thawed and squeezed dry). Whatever you use, make sure it’s chopped into small pieces and all vegetables have been cooked down to remove most of their moisture. 

Muffin ingredients stirred together in a bowl

Gently stir the ingredients together until combined. Try not to stir too vigorously because that moist stuffing can kind of turn into a paste if stirred too much, and you want this mixture to remain chunky.

Solid ingredients added to the muffin tin

Divide the stuffing mixture between the 12 wells of a muffin tin. Do not pack the stuffing down into the well, you want there to be some empty space to be filled in with the egg mixture.

milk and eggs in a bowl with a whisk

Whisk together 6 eggs, 2 Tbsp of milk or cream, 1/4 tsp salt, and ¼ tsp freshly cracked pepper. Whisk until it’s really smooth to make it easier to pour into the muffin tins.

Egg mixture being scooped into the muffin tin

Divide the whisked egg mixture between all 12 wells of the muffin tin. To make sure you don’t run out of egg mixture, start by adding just 2 Tbsp to each well, then go back to add a little bit more to each until you’ve used all of the egg mixture. The egg will not fully cover the solid ingredients. The egg will puff up quite a bit as it bakes.

baked leftover stuffing muffins

Bake the Leftover Stuffing Muffins in the preheated 375ºF oven for 25-30 minutes, or until the tops are brown and crispy on the edges. Let them cool slightly, then run a knife around the edges to help loosen and remove the muffins.

Close up of leftover stuffing muffins on a cooling rack

Allow them to cool to room temperature, then transfer to an air-tight container to store in the refrigerator or freezer. A quick zap in the microwave will make them hot and breakfast ready!

The post Leftover Stuffing Muffins appeared first on Budget Bytes.

Prosciutto Wrapped Stuffed Turkey Breast.

This prosciutto wrapped turkey breast is stuffed with fresh herbs, garlic and dried cranberries. It’s the perfect Thanksgiving entree and stunning on a table! Plus, it tastes fantastic. Time to add this deliciousness to your menu! I’ve got the simplest turkey option on the menu for you today! We’ve got one week to go until […]

The post Prosciutto Wrapped Stuffed Turkey Breast. appeared first on How Sweet Eats.

This prosciutto wrapped turkey breast is stuffed with fresh herbs, garlic and dried cranberries. It’s the perfect Thanksgiving entree and stunning on a table! Plus, it tastes fantastic.

Time to add this deliciousness to your menu!

prosciutto wrapped stuffed turkey breast

I’ve got the simplest turkey option on the menu for you today! We’ve got one week to go until Thanksgiving so if you’re still scrambling for a main dish, I AM HERE FOR YOU! 

And it’s ridiculously delicious.

prosciutto wrapped stuffed turkey breast

A gorgeous stuffed turkey breast, loaded with fresh herbs and dried cranberries (or cherries!) and garlic and wrapped in crispy prosciutto. Best meal ever!

stuffing on turkey breast

I have so many delicious stuffed pork tenderloin recipes that we love to bust out during the holiday season. They are easier than you think and can be stuffed with so many delicious ingredients. And because of that, I knew a stuffed turkey breast had to happen too!

I’ve wanted to share one for years but finally made it happen. This is the perfect dish for Thanksgiving if you’re hosting a smaller gathering or if you’re intimidated by a whole turkey. Or, if you’re like me and prefer to save room for all of the sides!

Side dishes are where it’s at. Give me a plate of sides please.

prosciutto wrapped stuffed turkey breast

The filling for this stuffed turkey breast is SO good. It’s super simple too. All you need for the filling is:

A bunch of chopped herbs

Minced garlic 

Bread crumbs – I like seasoned ones! 

Dried cranberries or cherries

Mix that all together, spread it on the turkey breast and you’re golden.

FLAVOR CENTRAL!!

prosciutto wrapped stuffed turkey breast

Oh but it gets better because I can’t possibly stop there. Instead of simply stuffing the turkey and roasting it like that, I also wrap it in prosciutto.

Oh my word. 

The prosciutto gets so crispy and crunchy – it flakes right off and almost melts in your mouth. It provides the most savory, crisp element to the stuffed turkey. Especially since the turkey has a little dried fruit in it. 

prosciutto wrapped stuffed turkey breast

Not only is this less intimidating than a whole turkey – there are a few other bonuses too. First, it’s on the smaller side side and simpler to make, so you could actually make two of them with completely different flavor profiles! Stuff them with different ingredients and enjoy the excitement.

And second, this is SO pretty on the table. It makes for a lovely centerpiece and really shines!  (more…)

The post Prosciutto Wrapped Stuffed Turkey Breast. appeared first on How Sweet Eats.