6 Kitchen Scraps to Use in the Garden—Even if You Don’t Compost

If you’re already composting (be it on your countertop, in your backyard, or squirreled away in the freezer), good for you! Composting, while very advantageous for the environment and our kitchen scraps, is sometimes a hard hobby to get into. If …

If you’re already composting (be it on your countertop, in your backyard, or squirreled away in the freezer), good for you! Composting, while very advantageous for the environment and our kitchen scraps, is sometimes a hard hobby to get into. If you haven’t yet picked it up, but are looking for ways to reduce your kitchen waste, look no further. There are plenty of ways to use your leftovers in your garden, from organic pest deterrents, to yellow jacket traps, to ground covering that prevents weed growth. Read on for some of our favorite scrap-lications.

eggshell seed starter pots

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7 Simple Cooking Tips for Your Eco-Friendliest Kitchen

With The Climate Diet, award-winning food and environmental writer Paul Greenberg offers us the practical, accessible guide we all need. This new release contains fifty achievable steps we can take to live our daily lives in a way that’s friendlier to …

With The Climate Diet, award-winning food and environmental writer Paul Greenberg offers us the practical, accessible guide we all need. This new release contains fifty achievable steps we can take to live our daily lives in a way that’s friendlier to the planet—from what we eat, how we live at home, how we travel, and how we lobby businesses and elected officials to do the right thing. Here, Paul shares a whole host of simple tips to make our cooking—and yes, our kitchens overall—a whole lot more sustainable.


With the news this month that Eleven Madison Park, by some measures the most famous restaurant in the world, has gone vegan, I think it’s safe to say climate-conscious menu planning has gone mainstream. Queries for vegan recipes now regularly top Google food searches and any number of plant-based meat replacements are now widely available at American supermarkets, potentially pairing with millions of tons of emissions off of our meals.

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15 Very Doable Tweaks to Reduce Kitchen Waste

A Full Plate is a column about family life and the home by contributing writer Laura Fenton, who explores the intersection of sustainable living and home design through a mother’s eyes.

Quick, where’s the biggest garbage can inside your home? Bet yo…

A Full Plate is a column about family life and the home by contributing writer Laura Fenton, who explores the intersection of sustainable living and home design through a mother’s eyes.


Quick, where’s the biggest garbage can inside your home? Bet you said the kitchen, right? Our kitchens are the source of so much of the waste that flows into—and out of—our homes. From food packaging to forgotten leftovers, the trash fills up quickly.

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12 Ideas to Upgrade Your Outdoor Space, Sustainably

There is no better feeling than breaking out your outdoor decor for the season. You know the day: the weather has finally hit 60 degrees and you can’t wait to blissfully sit out on your porch (slash deck, slash apartment terrace) and finally finally fe…

There is no better feeling than breaking out your outdoor decor for the season. You know the day: the weather has finally hit 60 degrees and you can’t wait to blissfully sit out on your porch (slash deck, slash apartment terrace) and finally finally feel the sun warm your face again (with SPF 45 on, of course). Whether you have just enough room for a bistro table and chairs or a whole outdoor living room to play around with, our fresh-air spaces quickly become sanctuaries for the next several months.

My partner and I have been in the market for some new outdoor decor now that we own a home and finally have a backyard of our own to deck out. And, while there are so many beautiful options out there, the "consume, consume, consume" mindset that comes with buying (and decorating) a new home can often feel like… a lot. To help ease our environmental footprint a bit, we decided to approach shopping for our very own oasis from an eco-conscious mindset, and look to items that were sustainably made to outfit our outdoor space.

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15 Eco-Friendly Tricks We’ve Learned in the Last Year

We’ve come through a year that changed our lives more than any of us could’ve imagined: When a pandemic impacted millions of lives, unemployment soared, small businesses struggled, and our lives retreated to the four walls of our homes.

And what of th…

We’ve come through a year that changed our lives more than any of us could've imagined: When a pandemic impacted millions of lives, unemployment soared, small businesses struggled, and our lives retreated to the four walls of our homes.

And what of the impact on the earth? A year when black-footed penguins took over the empty streets of Cape Town, South Africa, and people in India saw the Himalayas from their roofs for the first time from over 100 miles away, and birdsong was louder (and prettier) than ever was also a year of food shortages, natural disasters, and increased plastic pollution.

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This Cutting Board Is Made From Single-Use Utensils

In one corner of my cutlery drawer sits an unlikely candidate: my guilt. It sits atop a bunch of forks and spoons, paper napkins, and chopsticks—my cumulative takeout “extras.” For years I have tried to address this via the number of times we order in …

In one corner of my cutlery drawer sits an unlikely candidate: my guilt. It sits atop a bunch of forks and spoons, paper napkins, and chopsticks—my cumulative takeout "extras." For years I have tried to address this via the number of times we order in (which is at odds with wanting to support our local restaurants), what we order, and repeatedly writing “NO CUTLERY AND NAPKINS, PLEASE!!!” in the special requests section. Yet... the single-use cutlery keeps finding its way in.

Each year, after just one use, millions of units of restaurant cutlery are thrown out, and end up in landfills and in our waterways. Plastic cups, plates, utensils, and straws are obviously a big source of pollution (a smart and successful campaign made straws the villain of the piece), but as I’ve learned, wooden (bamboo and others) chopsticks are culpable, too. The common assumption that chopsticks are produced with scrap wood products just isn’t true: millions of trees are logged each year to make chopsticks that are shipped around the world, used once, and discarded. And because they’re treated with chemicals, and soiled after use, they often can’t be recycled.

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We Love This Low-Stress Decluttering Challenge

It’s rare that a new decluttering or organizing method comes along that feels like something new. But Christine Platt, the author of the forthcoming book The Afrominimalist’s Guide to Living With Less and the person behind @afrominimalist on Instagram,…

It’s rare that a new decluttering or organizing method comes along that feels like something new. But Christine Platt, the author of the forthcoming book The Afrominimalist’s Guide to Living With Less and the person behind @afrominimalist on Instagram, has our attention with her slow-and-steady decluttering challenge. Christine’s brand of minimalism looks very different from the one in our popular imagination—that of white rooms filled with the bare minimum of furnishings. It looks a lot more like what I’d call real life: In her home you’ll find colorful textiles, plenty of books, personal photos, and a cute (but small) collection of coffee mugs.

Christine Platt, aka, the Afrominimalist

Christine’s approach to decluttering is also radical in its simplicity. Two years ago, she dreamed up the #1thing1day1year challenge. The idea came about after hearing from so many people who said they wanted to live a more minimalist lifestyle, but couldn't do it. Christine says, “I thought if it's just one thing a day, it would be a nice way to have people ease into it. Making it just one thing keeps it low-pressure.” But she also knows the infectious nature of clearing space out would get people to say goodbye to more than just one thing on some days.

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Your Biggest Climate Decision Isn’t What You Cook—It’s What You Don’t

With The Climate Diet, award-winning food and environmental writer Paul Greenberg offers us the practical, accessible guide we all need. This new release contains fifty achievable steps we can take to live our daily lives in a way that’s friendlier to …

With The Climate Diet, award-winning food and environmental writer Paul Greenberg offers us the practical, accessible guide we all need. This new release contains fifty achievable steps we can take to live our daily lives in a way that’s friendlier to the planet—from what we eat, how we live at home, how we travel, and how we lobby businesses and elected officials to do the right thing. Here, Paul shares on the the role of food waste in our overall climate decision making—and how it's a much bigger deal than we think.


We spend a lot of time climate-agonizing over what to buy and what to cook. By now, most of us know that beef can have 25 times the carbon footprint of legumes, that out-of-season air-freighted things like winter berries and fish from distant shores burden the planet, and that water from the tap is a vastly better choice than bottled. But if we’re really looking to trim our carbon footprints consistently throughout the year—what I call going on a climate diet—addressing what we do after our meals are cooked and eaten can be a real game changer. By doing that, every American could easily cut their carbon footprint from food in half.

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11 Expert Tips for Thrift Shopping (Secondhand Treasures Await!)

A Full Plate is a column about family life and the home by contributing writer Laura Fenton, who explores the intersection of thoughtful living and home design through a mother’s eyes.

When I was pregnant with my son, a college friend told me, “I ha…

A Full Plate is a column about family life and the home by contributing writer Laura Fenton, who explores the intersection of thoughtful living and home design through a mother’s eyes.


When I was pregnant with my son, a college friend told me, “I have one piece of advice for you: Don’t buy anything new.” He was a dad of two by then and knew how quickly kids grow out of things, and how short a time we’d actually use our baby gear. I was already a flea market shopper, but I took his advice to heart as we added to our home to accommodate a child: buying a vintage rocker and dresser to furnish our son’s nursery and saying yes to all the hand-me-downs. Six years later, this “nothing new” mindset extends to almost every purchase I make.

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Thinking About Composting? This Is Your Ultimate Guide

It’s always gross when you go to take out the trash, only to find the bag smells like rotting food—and maybe is even dripping from the bottom. Bleck. But what if I told you there was a way to prevent your trash from smelling, all while being more eco-f…

It’s always gross when you go to take out the trash, only to find the bag smells like rotting food—and maybe is even dripping from the bottom. Bleck. But what if I told you there was a way to prevent your trash from smelling, all while being more eco-friendly in the process? Sign me up!

Composting offers both these noteworthy benefits, not to mention that it creates rich fertilizer that your gardens or houseplants will love. (Seriously, people call it “black gold”!) However, I didn’t know the first thing about composting—not to mention how I could do it in my apartment—so I called in an expert: Erin Rhoads, an eco-lifestyle blogger and the author of Waste Not, a guide on how to make a big difference by throwing away less.

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