19 Recipes From Black Food Bloggers to Celebrate Juneteenth

Juneteenth (June Nineteenth) marks the date in 1865 when the news of emancipation finally reached Galveston, Texas. On this day, over two years after the Emancipation Proclamation was signed, nearly 250,000 enslaved people were freed. 
Although America…

Juneteenth (June Nineteenth) marks the date in 1865 when the news of emancipation finally reached Galveston, Texas. On this day, over two years after the Emancipation Proclamation was signed, nearly 250,000 enslaved people were freed.  Although America’s history has and continues to be blemished with senseless acts of violence, brutality, and inequality toward the Black community, today, Juneteenth serves as a national day of remembrance and honor. And in a historic moment, on June 16th, 2021 the United States Senate unanimously passed a bill to make Juneteenth a federal holiday. 

Through joyful celebrations and soulful traditions, Juneteenth allows us to make space to pay homage to our ancestors by acknowledging their struggles and perseverance. And at the center of these celebrations are an expansive range of soulful recipes with deep-rooted histories as rich and diverse as the Black experience itself.

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Vegan Strawberry Shortcake

Whip up this vegan strawberry shortcake for your next sweet tooth craving. Homemade vegan strawberry shortcakes topped with fresh strawberries, and a coconut whipped cream. This is the ultimate dessert for strawberry season.  This strawberry short…

Whip up this vegan strawberry shortcake for your next sweet tooth craving. Homemade vegan strawberry shortcakes topped with fresh strawberries, and a coconut whipped cream. This is the ultimate dessert for strawberry season.  This strawberry shortcake recipe is perfect for summer entertaining, take to a holiday gathering, or your next potluck event. Don't wait, try...

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This article was written and published by Oh My Veggies. It may not be reproduce or republished without permission of the author. The original article can be found here: Vegan Strawberry Shortcake.

Couscous Salad

This colorful couscous salad recipe tastes irresistibly fresh with herbs, garlic, and lemon! It’s ideal as a side dish, lunches,…

A Couple Cooks – Recipes worth repeating.

This colorful couscous salad recipe tastes irresistibly fresh with herbs, garlic, and lemon! It’s ideal as a side dish, lunches, picnics or potlucks.

Couscous Salad

Here’s a salad that’s about as delightful as they come: this fresh and herby Couscous Salad! It’s an ideal way to use Israeli couscous, those delightfully chewy pasta spheres. Throw it together with fresh dill and mint, garlic, lemon and a pile of vegetables, then sprinkle with salty feta. Take a bite and it’s irresistibly fresh and savory: we couldn’t stop eating it! This deli-style Israeli couscous salad works for lunch or picnics, or as a colorful side for fish, chicken or the grill. Really, what can’t this salad do? With one bite you’ll be smitten.

Ingredients in this couscous salad recipe

A couscous salad could work with Moroccan couscous, which has very small irregular pieces. But this one uses the larger perfectly round Israeli couscous, which technically isn’t couscous at all! We like an Israeli couscous salad because the larger size has a more distinguishable texture when mixed in with the veggies. Here’s what you’ll need for this salad:

  • Israeli couscous (aka pearl couscous)
  • Garlic powder
  • Garlic clove
  • Shallot
  • Cherry tomatoes
  • Fresh dill and fresh mint
  • Baby arugula
  • Feta cheese crumbles
  • Lemon juice and zest
  • Olive oil
  • Salt and pepper

Simply cook up the Israeli couscous, slice the veggies, and mix everything together! It’s quick and simple, and the flavor is unbelievably refreshing with a pop of acidity.

Israeli Couscous
Israeli couscous is larger in size than standard couscous and spherical

Couscous vs Israeli couscous

A little background on couscous! What’s the difference between standard couscous and Israeli couscous? Make sure to grab Israeli couscous when shopping for this recipe. Here’s what to know:

  • Couscous is a North African pasta with tiny grains made from semolina flour. Its texture looks like grains of rice or quinoa, but’s actually a pasta! It originated with the Berbers of Algeria and Morocco between the 11th century and 13th century. It’s a cultural dish of the Maghrebi cuisines in the countries of Algeria, Tunisia, Mauritania, Morocco, and Libya. Couscous has very small, irregular grains. It’s the standard variety and labeled “couscous” at the grocery (it typically won’t include the word Moroccan).
  • Israeli couscous aka pearl couscous is larger and shaped like balls. It’s technically considered a pasta and not couscous, since the grains are large and shaped exactly the same. It’s always been machine made, whereas couscous is made by hand. The food was invented in Israel in the 1950’s when the government needed to feed masses of immigrants.

Keep in mind: couscous is not gluten free and it’s not suitable for gluten-free diets. You can find gluten-free couscous online.

Couscous Salad

Look for baby arugula

One important note for this couscous salad: make sure to look for baby arugula! If you can’t find it, don’t substitute it with standard arugula. Here’s why:

  • Baby arugula has a feathery texture and is sold in bags or boxes. It has a delicately peppery flavor.
  • Standard arugula, sold in bunches, has a very spicy flavor that would overpower this salad!
  • Can’t find baby arugula? Substitute another baby green like baby spinach or baby kale.

Using fresh herbs in this couscous salad

This Israeli couscous salad goes big on herby flavor with fresh dill and fresh mint: they’re integral to the light, herbaceous flavor. But they can be expensive in winter months! Here are a few notes on working with fresh herbs:

  • If you can, use both fresh dill and mint. Growing your own herbs in the summer is the best way to keep this economical.
  • Want to use only one fresh herb? Go for the fresh dill and omit the mint.
  • Avoid substituting dried herbs: they have a much different flavor. If desired you can simply omit the herbs entirely: it still tastes good! (Just not quite as good.)
Couscous Salad

Ways to serve this couscous salad

This couscous salad is one of those ultra-versatile recipes that you can use for many different occasions and seasons. Here are some of our favorite ways to serve it:

Let us know how you plan to serve it in the comments below!

More salad recipes

Love a good grain or bean salad? They make a lovely easy side dish idea. Here are a few more fun recipes you’ll love:

This couscous salad recipe is…

Vegetarian. For gluten-free, look for gluten-free couscous online. For vegan and dairy-free, omit the feta and add a few pinches more salt.

Print
Couscous Salad

Couscous Salad


  • Author: Sonja Overhiser
  • Prep Time: 5 minutes
  • Cook Time: 15 minutes
  • Total Time: 20 minutes
  • Yield: 6 side dish servings

Description

This colorful couscous salad recipe tastes irresistibly fresh with herbs, garlic, and lemon! It’s ideal as a side dish, lunches, picnics or potlucks.


Ingredients

  • 1 cup Israeli couscous (aka pearl couscous; look for gluten-free if desired)
  • ¼ teaspoon garlic powder
  • ¾ teaspoon kosher salt, divided
  • 1 large garlic clove, minced
  • 1 shallot, minced
  • 1 pint cherry tomatoes, sliced
  • ¼ cup chopped fresh dill
  • 3 tablespoons chopped fresh mint**
  • 2 cups baby arugula (or other baby greens)*
  • ½ cup feta cheese crumbles (omit for vegan and add more salt to taste)
  • 2 tablespoons lemon juice, plus zest of ½ lemon
  • 1 tablespoon plus 1 teaspoon olive oil
  • Fresh ground black pepper

Instructions

  1. Bring 1 ½ cups water to a boil in a large saucepan. Add the Israeli couscous, garlic powder and ½ teaspoon of the kosher salt and reduce to a simmer. Cover with lid and cook 8 to 10 minutes, until the couscous is tender and the water is absorbed.  Remove the couscous to a bowl, mix it with 1 teaspoon of the olive oil, and allow to stand for 2 to 3 minutes. 
  2. Meanwhile, mince the garlic and shallot. Slice the cherry tomatoes in half. Chop the dill and mint.
  3. When the couscous is done resting, place it in a large bowl with the chopped vegetables and herbs. Add the baby arugula, feta cheese crumbles, lemon juice and zest, the remaining 1 tablespoon olive oil, ¼ teaspoon kosher salt, and a few grinds of black pepper. Mix gently to combine. Serve immediately or refrigerate for up to 5 days (flavor is best right away but tastes great after refrigeration; you may need to revive the flavors with a pinch or two of salt).

Notes

*Make sure to look for baby arugula, which has a feathery texture and is sold in bags or boxes. Standard arugula, sold in bunches, has much too spicy of a flavor. If you can’t find it, substitute another baby green like baby spinach or baby kale.

**If it’s winter and you’d like to pare back and use only one herb, go for the fresh dill. We highly recommend this salad with both fresh herbs (and try growing your own herbs in the summer). Avoid substituting dried herbs: you can simply omit the herbs entirely and it still tastes good.

  • Category: Salad
  • Method: Stovetop
  • Cuisine: Salad
  • Diet: Vegetarian

Keywords: Couscous salad

A Couple Cooks - Recipes worth repeating.

Hearty Farro Salad

This farro salad recipe mixes fresh veggies and a tangy dressing with this hearty whole grain! It makes a satisfying…

A Couple Cooks – Recipes worth repeating.

This farro salad recipe mixes fresh veggies and a tangy dressing with this hearty whole grain! It makes a satisfying side dish or lunch salad.

Farro Salad

Need a killer side salad or a fun lunch salad? Here’s a recipe that works as both: this Hearty Farro Salad! Farro is an ancient grain with a chewy texture and nutty flavor that’s burst on the scene in the past few years. It’s great as a side dish seasoned with garlic and herbs, but it’s also ideal for grain salads. This one is our new ultimate, pairing the whole grain with juicy tomatoes, earthy mushrooms, feathery arugula, savory pops of cheese, and a zingy vinaigrette.

Ingredients in this farro salad

This farro salad is fresh and veggie-packed, perfect as a side dish for dinner or as a lunch salad. You can save it up to 4 days refrigerated, so we typically use it for both! The flavor is Mediterranean-style, with a beautiful rainbow of jumbled vegetables. Here are the main ingredients you’ll need to make this farro salad:

  • Farro: pearled or semi pearled
  • Shallot and garlic
  • Cherry tomatoes, rainbow if possible
  • Button or cremini mushrooms
  • Carrot
  • Fresh herbs: fresh chives, mint or basil
  • Baby arugula: use only baby arugula here! Standard arugula has too strong of a flavor. For a substitute, use other baby greens.
  • Manchego cheese: or use Parmesan or fontina cheese (omit for vegan)
  • Lemon juice
  • Dijon mustard
  • Olive oil
Farro Salad

Types of farro

Farro is a whole grain that’s plump and chewy, with a texture similar to barley. It’s been a staple in Italian cuisine for centuries and recently spread to global popularity. Farro can be boiled on the stovetop, cooked in a rice cooker, or in a pressure cooker (Instant Pot). There are a few types you can find in American grocery stores:

  • Pearled farro has all of the bran removed from the grain, making it quicker to cook but removing some fiber. The cook time is 15 to 20 minutes.
  • Semi-pearled farro has part of the bran removed, retaining some additional fiber. The cook time is 25 to 30 minutes.
  • Whole farro is the whole grain and takes the longest to cook, but it’s harder to find in grocery stores (in the US). So this farro salad works with pearled or semi pearled!

Keep in mind: the labeling of this grain in the grocery store can be confusing. Many packages don’t contain the words pearled or semi-pearled (looking at you, Bob’s Red Mill). Check the cook time on the package as a guide.

Farro

Tips on substitutions

This farro salad is pretty forgiving, and you can substitute or add different vegetables or cheese to taste. Here are a few ideas:

  • Mushrooms: omit if you’re not a mushroom fan, but the raw mushrooms add a great earthy flavor and soft texture here!
  • Baby arugula: don’t substitute standard arugula sold in bunches; it’s much too spicy! Use other baby greens like baby spinach or baby kale.
  • Cheese: Manchego cheese is a Spanish cheese with a sweet, fruity flavor and firm texture that’s fabulous here! If you can’t find it, try Parmesan shavings instead. Or for a fun variation use Fontina cheese (like this Farro with Roasted Vegetables). You can also omit the cheese for vegan.
  • Tomatoes: Out of season, look for greenhouse or hydroponic cherry tomatoes. Or add ripe, local cherry tomatoes in summer! For allergies, try another red vegetable like red pepper.
Farro Salad

Ways to serve this farro salad

This farro salad is so versatile and works with many different meal concepts. Here are some ideas:

How do you plan to serve it? Let us know in the comments below!

More farro recipes

Farro is one of our favorite grains (though of course, don’t forget quinoa!). Here are a few more farro recipes to use up your bag:

This farro salad recipe is…

Vegetarian. For vegan, plant-based and dairy-free, omit the cheese.

Print
Farro Salad

Hearty Farro Salad


  • Author: Sonja Overhiser
  • Prep Time: 10 minutes
  • Cook Time: 20 minutes
  • Total Time: 30 minutes
  • Yield: 6

Description

This farro salad recipe mixes fresh veggies and a tangy dressing with this hearty whole grain! It makes a satisfying side dish or lunch salad.


Ingredients

  • 1 cup dry farro (pearled or semi pearled)
  • 1 teaspoon kosher salt, divided
  • 1 shallot, minced
  • 1 small garlic clove, minced
  • 1 cup cherry tomatoes, halved or quartered
  • 4 ounces button or cremini mushrooms, thinly sliced
  • 1 carrot, peeled and thinly sliced
  • ¼ cup chopped fresh herbs (like fresh chives, mint or basil)
  • 2 cups baby arugula (or other baby greens)
  • ½ cup Manchego cheese, sliced into chunks (or Parmesan shavings or fontina cheese; omit for vegan)
  • 2 tablespoons lemon juice
  • 1 teaspoon Dijon mustard
  • ½ teaspoon dried oregano
  • 3 tablespoons olive oil

Instructions

  1. Cook the farro: Rinse the farro under cold water in a fine mesh strainer. In a large saucepan, place the farro, 3 cups water and ½ teaspoon of the kosher salt and bring it to a boil. Reduce the heat to a simmer, cover, and cook until the grains are tender, about 15 to 20 minutes for pearled farro and 25 to 30 minutes for semi-pearled farro. Taste test a grain to see if it is tender (if the package is unmarked, just cook until tender). Drain any excess water. Stir in the additional ¼ teaspoon salt. Place on a baking sheet in a single layer and place in the freezer for 3 minutes until room temperature. (This step can be completed up to 2 days in advance; refrigerate the farro until making the salad.)
  2. Prep the veggies: Meanwhile, chop the shallot, garlic, cherry tomatoes, mushrooms, carrot, and fresh herbs as noted in the ingredient list above. Place the veggies in a large bowl, then add the baby arugula, cheese, and farro. 
  3. Make the dressing: In a medium bowl, whisk together the lemon juice, Dijon mustard, oregano, and ¼ teaspoon kosher salt. Gradually whisk in the olive oil 1 tablespoon at a time, until creamy. 
  4. Serve: Add the dressing to the bowl with farro and vegetables and toss. Taste and add another pinch or two of salt if desired. (Stores up to 4 days refrigerated; you may need to add a pinch or two more salt after refrigeration since it can dull the flavors.)
  • Category: Side dish
  • Method: Salad
  • Cuisine: Salad
  • Diet: Vegetarian

Keywords: Farro salad

A Couple Cooks - Recipes worth repeating.

33 Innovative Recipes to Honor Black History Month

Black History Month is here. Started in 1976, it is a time when we make space to pay homage to the rich, deep history of African Americans and celebrate their brilliance, perseverance, and invaluable contributions in our society. One aspect central to …

Black History Month is here. Started in 1976, it is a time when we make space to pay homage to the rich, deep history of African Americans and celebrate their brilliance, perseverance, and invaluable contributions in our society. One aspect central to this history is food, which is as diverse and nuanced as the Black experience itself.

Since 2017, Black food bloggers and content creators have come together to celebrate this joyous occasion by contributing recipes to the Black History Month Virtual Potluck. This year there is an exciting change: The potluck is now branded under Eat the Culture. Founded by Meiko Temple of Meiko and the Dish, Eat the Culture was established to create community-centered spaces that nurture, support, and amplify Black culinary creators. In addition to collaborations like this potluck, the organization also offers educational resources, virtual courses, and live events to help creatives elevate their craft and amplify the culinary heritage across the African diaspora.

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32 Best Potluck Recipes to Bring On-the-Go

Yay! You got invited to a party. But wait…it’s a potluck party. That means you have to bring something! Do you go sweet or savory? Do you choose something you can serve at room temperature or a dish that needs to be heated up? Even if you’re the Mart…

Yay! You got invited to a party. But wait...it's a potluck party. That means you have to bring something! Do you go sweet or savory? Do you choose something you can serve at room temperature or a dish that needs to be heated up? Even if you're the Martha Stewart or Amanda Hesser among your friend group, deciding what to cook and serve to family, friends, and possibly some strangers too can be stressful. Let us help steer you in the right direction with more than 30 of our best potluck recipes.

1. Olive Oil Blondies With Salted Caramel

You offered to bring dessert for your friend’s potluck party, but now the day is here and you have no idea what to make. How about these salty-sweet blondies that are crowd-friendly, quick to bake, and easy to transport on the road?

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10 Cold, Quick Noodle Salads for the Hungry, Hurried & Hot

If I could, I’d eat a bowl of cold noodle salad every noon and night till the fall winds cometh.

Noodles are the softest, squiggliest landing pads for a variety of summer vegetables (not to mention all sorts of cubed cheeses and salty fridge accessori…

If I could, I'd eat a bowl of cold noodle salad every noon and night till the fall winds cometh.

Noodles are the softest, squiggliest landing pads for a variety of summer vegetables (not to mention all sorts of cubed cheeses and salty fridge accessories, like capers, olives, and anchovies). Add a heap of noodles to July tomatoes slicked with olive oil and suddenly, you've got a meal, not a snack. (Add a spoonful of chili paste and suddenly, you're a little chef.)

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38 Jubilant Recipes to Kick Off Black History Month

February marks the kickoff of Black History Month, a 50-plus-year-old tradition celebrating Black culture. After gaining traction on college campuses in the late 1960s, Black History Month was recognized by President Gerald Ford in 1976.

And rightfull…

February marks the kickoff of Black History Month, a 50-plus-year-old tradition celebrating Black culture. After gaining traction on college campuses in the late 1960s, Black History Month was recognized by President Gerald Ford in 1976.

And rightfully so, considering Black people helped build the foundation of this nation. Now amid racial tensions coupled with the coronavirus pandemic, we’re all looking for something to be excited about, something to make us feel good again.

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68 Recipes From Black Creators to Celebrate Juneteenth

This Juneteenth probably won’t look the same as it has in the past. Expect to see fewer cookouts, outdoor music concerts, parades, and festivals. This year we have to improvise and find ways to honor our innate spirit of perseverance and celebrate the …

This Juneteenth probably won’t look the same as it has in the past. Expect to see fewer cookouts, outdoor music concerts, parades, and festivals. This year we have to improvise and find ways to honor our innate spirit of perseverance and celebrate the resilience our ancestors demonstrated in their plight to freedom.

And for that reason, almost 70 Black food creatives have to come together to share recipes in a digital cookout, inspired by this holiday and the African diaspora, all to continue our legacy of communion, albeit virtually, and share our history with the world.

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17 Last-Minute Potluck Ideas That Feed a Crowd in No Time Flat

It’s almost the weekend and you’re excited to get to that picnic, barbecue, or cookout your friends invited you to. But as you look back at the invitation (or scroll to the bottom of the email) for the get-together, you realize tha…

It’s almost the weekend and you're excited to get to that picnic, barbecue, or cookout your friends invited you to. But as you look back at the invitation (or scroll to the bottom of the email) for the get-together, you realize that it says “potluck.”

...Wait, what? Oh no. You definitely didn’t see that before. You most certainly are not prepared.

But never fear. Food52 is here to save you with some effortless recipes fit for a crowd. Wow your friends with rich chocolate cake or spicy salsa.

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