How to Use Rice as a Pie Weight

How to Use Rice as a Pie Weight

The crust is the foundation of most pie recipes and many of those recipes call for the crusts to be blind baked. Blind baking is when you partially bake (or sometimes fully bake) the crust before adding the filling, which helps ensure that the finished pie and crust combination …

The post How to Use Rice as a Pie Weight appeared first on Baking Bites.

How to Use Rice as a Pie Weight

The crust is the foundation of most pie recipes and many of those recipes call for the crusts to be blind baked. Blind baking is when you partially bake (or sometimes fully bake) the crust before adding the filling, which helps ensure that the finished pie and crust combination will both be completely cooked through.

Most pastry doughs have layers of butter or other fats that are intended to make the baked pastries tender and flaky. They also tend to puff up during baking if they aren’t weighed down – so bakers tend to use pie weights to keep the crust in place while its in the oven. You can buy pie weights at most baking stores, but dried beans are a commonly recommended substitute. But what if you don’t have beans to use as pie weights? Learn how to use rice as a pie weight instead!

How to Use Rice as a Pie Weight

Rice is extremely easy to use as a pie weight and it is my go-to when it comes to baking pie crusts. You will need 1-2 cups of uncooked rice to weight down your pastry for an average 9-inch pie. To use the rice as a pie weight, roll out your pie crust and shape it into your pie dish. Gently press a piece of aluminum foil over the top of the unbaked crust, then fill the foil with the uncooked rice. Bake the crust as directed by your recipe.

When the crust is baked – either partially or fully – lift out the aluminum foil and pour the uncooked rice into a plastic bag or small storage container to use for the next time. You can use parchment paper in place of foil, but the foil is a bit easier to press into the corners of the pie and will often give you better coverage. There is no need to grease the foil, since there is plenty of butter or other fat in your pastry crust already.

How to Use Rice as a Pie Weight

Rice works beautifully here for a few reasons. First, even more people have rice on hand than uncooked beans. Second, the rice really fills the pie crusts evenly, getting into small corners where beans and other pie weights find it difficult to fit. Finally. uncooked rice has very little moisture, so it doesn’t change shape and cools down easily after baking.

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It’s National Donut Day! Celebrate With These 12 Recipes

It’s National Doughnut Day (Or National Donut Day, depending on where your grammatical proclivities point)! While we believe every day is an excuse to eat doughnuts (and fritters, twists, bear claws, and more), today is worthy of an extra-large bite. S…

It’s National Doughnut Day (Or National Donut Day, depending on where your grammatical proclivities point)! While we believe every day is an excuse to eat doughnuts (and fritters, twists, bear claws, and more), today is worthy of an extra-large bite. So to celebrate, we’re sharing a dozen of our favorite homemade doughnut recipes that you can make now and enjoy all weekend long.

1. Basic Cake Doughnuts

Let’s start with the basics—these classic vanilla cake doughnuts (but don’t worry—we have a substitution for chocolate ones too!). Finish them with vanilla or chocolate glaze, matcha white chocolate, or old-fashioned cinnamon-sugar.

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How to Make Swirly, Flaky Sfogliatelle

Buckle up, guys—this pastry is definitely a project. But trust me, it’s a super fun, satisfying, and delicious one. There’s nothing like a batch of still-warm sfogliatelle (or if you’re just referring to one, sfogliatella), an especially beautiful Ital…

Buckle up, guys—this pastry is definitely a project. But trust me, it’s a super fun, satisfying, and delicious one. There’s nothing like a batch of still-warm sfogliatelle (or if you’re just referring to one, sfogliatella), an especially beautiful Italian pastry. Multiple layers of gorgeously thin dough (rolled using a pasta machine) encase a creamy filling made with a base of semolina “pudding” and ricotta cheese. The pastry, sometimes referred to as “lobster claws” (not “lobster tails,” that’s something else) here in the States, bake up gorgeously golden and crisp. The result is a seriously impressive pastry that’s time-consuming, but totally doable at home, and worth it. Ahead, I’ll walk you through exactly how to make sfogliatelle at home using my go-to recipe and you’ll be folding and shaping dough in no time.

But First…How Do You Pronounce Sfogliatelle?

Let me take a stab at this one—Ss-fog-lee-uh-tell-ee.

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Flan Parisien

When people inquire about recipes from the pastries on offer in Paris pastry shops, I look at the recipes we used when I went to pastry school at Ecole Lênotre and it’s hard to imagine cutting down a recipe that makes a hundred canelés into a recipe that makes six or eight for a home cook, who likely doesn’t want to go out and buy…

When people inquire about recipes from the pastries on offer in Paris pastry shops, I look at the recipes we used when I went to pastry school at Ecole Lênotre and it’s hard to imagine cutting down a recipe that makes a hundred canelés into a recipe that makes six or eight for a home cook, who likely doesn’t want to go out and buy a hundred copper canelé molds at 35 dollars (or even €10-15) a pop. Professional bakeries don’t make a single gâteau Opéra or eight éclairs; it’s might be a dozen cakes, five or six dozen éclairs, and hundreds of caramels. So paring down a recipe that won’t overwhelm the oven, kitchen…or budget…of a home baker can be a challenge

Professional bakeries also make components separately as part of their schedule, and in large quantities, and will start the puff pastry or make the pastry cream for a cake or tart in advance, then assemble them over the course of several days. Often recipes depend on techniques learned over a period of time, such as macaronage, the proper stirring and folding of macaron batter, and aren’t just a list of ingredients. So as wonderful and generous as bakers tend to be, not all professionals can share (or in some cases, are willing to part with) the secrets of their success.

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How to Make Sausage Rolls Like You’re on ‘The Great British Bake Off’

This week’s episode of The Great British Bake Off wasn’t entirely sweet. In fact, it was a little savory too. During the technical challenge, the five remaining contestants were tasked with making eight vegan sausage rolls as part of the episode’s “fre…

This week’s episode of The Great British Bake Off wasn’t entirely sweet. In fact, it was a little savory too. During the technical challenge, the five remaining contestants were tasked with making eight vegan sausage rolls as part of the episode's “free from” theme, which included dairy-free ice cream sandwiches and two-tier gluten-free cakes. “Flavor always matters, but in this recipe it’s absolutely key,” said co-judge Prue Leith, who introduced the challenge. Contestants were expected to make a crisp golden vegan rough puff pastry surrounding a mushroom and walnut filling, and accompanied by a sticky caramelized red onion chutney. But how do you make sausage rolls, anyway, vegan or otherwise?

How to Make Sausage Rolls

Food52’s recipe for traditional sausage rolls are made by spreading Dijon mustard over puff pastry and topping it with pork sausage meat, a drizzle of Worcestershire sauce, and a sprinkle of fresh thyme leaves. “To form the sausage rolls, fold the top half of the pastry over the sausage and press the edges together with a fork. Trim the edge to get a neat line then gently slice the pastry log into inch wide segments but do not fully separate. Lightly slash the top of each segment with a sharp knife and glaze with an egg wash,” writes recipe developer Lily Hughes. From here, bake the sausage rolls in a 400℉ oven for 30 minutes, or until the pastry is golden brown and the sausage is fully cooked. This recipe called for store-bought pork sausage and frozen and thawed puff pastry. But what kind of GBBO challenge would it be if both of the key ingredients weren’t made from scratch?

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How to Make Donuts From Scratch (Like You Know What You’re Doing)

Doughnuts, for me, represent absolute perfection. Don’t get me wrong: Pie is my number one; cake is near the top of my list; and I’ve never met a cookie I didn’t like. But doughnuts…there isn’t much in this world that&rsq…

Doughnuts, for me, represent absolute perfection. Don’t get me wrong: Pie is my number one; cake is near the top of my list; and I’ve never met a cookie I didn’t like. But doughnuts…there isn’t much in this world that’s better than a good—no, a GREAT—doughnut. Sure, they can be doused in sugary glaze and topped generously with sprinkles, but the dough itself isn’t too sweet‚it’s just yeasty and light and fluffy and perfect. It’s the ideal canvas for endless variations to suit your whims. 

The real reason doughnuts are so wonderful to me is the connection they have to my past. My grandmother lived in a house built by my great-great-great grandparents: a real little house on the prairie in the middle of nowhere, Kansas. When my grandma was a kid, it was her grandma’s house; same for my dad; and luckily, for me too. Along with the wonderful history of the place itself, the house was home to a lot of our own food history. One day, my grandma pulled out a pretty little yellow tin recipe box. The paint was chipped, but it was lovely and chock-full of my great-great grandma’s recipes. This includes the tattered old card that contained the handwritten recipe for these doughnuts. When a recipe is good, it stands the test of time—and these doughnuts do just that. 

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How to Master Pâte à Choux (For Éclairs, Gougeres & Cute Little Cream Puffs)

This original article was written to detail the process of specifically making crullers, a fried pâte à choux based pastry. For the February episode of Bake it Up a Notch, we took a deep dive into all things pâte à choux, and …

This original article was written to detail the process of specifically making crullers, a fried pâte à choux based pastry. For the February episode of Bake it Up a Notch, we took a deep dive into all things pâte à choux, and I wanted to update the article to discuss the broader scope of this process—one of my favorite pastry building blocks and baking standbys.

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The Storage Hack That Leads to Flakier Pastries

How many times has a pie crust or biscuit or scone recipe insisted that you start with cold butter and make sure it stays cold at all costs?

This, we are told, is the secret to success. Because when cold butter bits nestled in pillowy dough hit a hot …

How many times has a pie crust or biscuit or scone recipe insisted that you start with cold butter and make sure it stays cold at all costs?

This, we are told, is the secret to success. Because when cold butter bits nestled in pillowy dough hit a hot oven, they melt, producing steam, creating layers, yielding flaky baked goods. Hence the proceed-with-caution signs for warm fingertips and summery kitchens.

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Bostock

One of the lesser-known French pastries is Bostock. Perhaps it’s the funny name that doesn’t sound very French, as pain au chocolat or chausson aux pommes do, that’s been keeping it out of the spotlight. True, the name does sound like a Swiss bouillon mix and although I’ve read it’s from Normandy, I haven’t found any conclusive evidence of that. But wherever it’s from, the…

One of the lesser-known French pastries is Bostock. Perhaps it’s the funny name that doesn’t sound very French, as pain au chocolat or chausson aux pommes do, that’s been keeping it out of the spotlight. True, the name does sound like a Swiss bouillon mix and although I’ve read it’s from Normandy, I haven’t found any conclusive evidence of that. But wherever it’s from, the good thing about Bostock is that it’s one of the easiest desserts to make and doesn’t require rolling out any pastry, spending a day making brioche, or rely on any fancy techniques. It’s one of my very favorite things to eat.

Bostock was likely invented to use up leftover brioche that bakeries had on hand after they closed their doors. Bakers everywhere are naturally thrifty and this is a clever way to use up leftover bread, whether it be brioche, challah, or any firm-textured white bread, such as pain de mie.

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