Dry Your Own Herbs and You’ll Never Have to Buy Bottled Again

Can You Dig It is a monthly series by Kristin Guy in which a real-life garden DIY is tackled with style. Whether you’ve got an expansive outdoor plot or just a few houseplants, Kristin will inspire you to grow even more with easy-to-accomplish projects…

Can You Dig It is a monthly series by Kristin Guy in which a real-life garden DIY is tackled with style. Whether you’ve got an expansive outdoor plot or just a few houseplants, Kristin will inspire you to grow even more with easy-to-accomplish projects and horticultural know-how.


When you think about preserving summer produce, pickling and canning are typically what comes to mind. Drying tends to be an afterthought, but it can be just as powerful for saving summertime flavors! There’s something calming about the drying process, too—you quite literally have to slow down and be patient—and you can easily create your own drying tools to make this ritual even more special.

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The Classic Decorating Trick That’s Making a Comeback

When it comes to quick ways to completely make over a room—with no remodeling involved—wallpaper easily rises to the top of my list. It’s a transformation you can accomplish in a weekend, and oftentimes, it doesn’t even require professional installatio…

When it comes to quick ways to completely make over a room—with no remodeling involved—wallpaper easily rises to the top of my list. It’s a transformation you can accomplish in a weekend, and oftentimes, it doesn’t even require professional installation. With the range of colors and patterns out there, it’s a great way to bring dimension, layers, and interest to a space.

While the earliest wallpapers (or painted decorative papers) date back to China, not too long after paper itself was invented, its extension, wallpaper borders, are relatively more recent, originating in the 1700s. If you’re unfamiliar with the use of wallpaper borders, they’re essentially thin strips of wallpaper meant to be used as accents instead of complete wall applications. They are typically horizontally oriented and measure between two to eight inches high. Their popularity has ebbed and flowed over time, but they’ve made a marked comeback—and are looking fresher, more modern, and less fussy than their predecessors.

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Here’s How to Emulsify Anything

A creamy hollandaise sauce drizzled over eggs Benedict. A rich, herby bearnaise sauce served on the side of a pan-seared steak. A rich dressing tossed over crunchy lettuce and juicy tomatoes. These silky, luxurious sauces all get their body via a proce…

A creamy hollandaise sauce drizzled over eggs Benedict. A rich, herby bearnaise sauce served on the side of a pan-seared steak. A rich dressing tossed over crunchy lettuce and juicy tomatoes. These silky, luxurious sauces all get their body via a process called emulsification. To understand emulsification—aka the process that happens when oil and water mix to create stable substances like mayonnaise, salad dressing, and even milk—we are going to have to talk science for a minute.

We promise that there will be no atomic diagrams, no Latin, and no, Bill Nye won’t be standing by your side in the kitchen. And if you hang on until the end, you’ll be rewarded with creamy aiolis, mayonnaise that won’t break, and vinaigrettes that hold together for days in the fridge. 

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We’re Rethinking Our Lawn Design (& You Should, Too)

If bright yellow dandelions and purple clover are popping up on lawns that usually look like carpet, or it’s eerily quiet on your street on a Saturday afternoon when you would otherwise hear the humming of lawn mowers, there’s a chance that your neighb…

If bright yellow dandelions and purple clover are popping up on lawns that usually look like carpet, or it’s eerily quiet on your street on a Saturday afternoon when you would otherwise hear the humming of lawn mowers, there's a chance that your neighbors are participating in the No-Mow May campaign.

The idea behind it is this: In May when native pollinators like bees and butterflies wake up after the winter, they need a major calorie boost to get them started for the season ahead. When faced with manicured lawns with no blooming plants in sight, our pollinator friends are starved for a meal. By not mowing for a month, you create a habitat—and place to forage—for bees and other early-season pollinators.

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A DIY Potting Tarp to Make Indoor Gardening Mess-Free

Can You Dig It is a new monthly series by Kristin Guy in which a real-life garden DIY is tackled with real style. Whether you’ve got an expansive outdoor plot or just a few houseplants, Kristin will inspire you to grow even more with easy-to-tackle pro…

Can You Dig It is a new monthly series by Kristin Guy in which a real-life garden DIY is tackled with real style. Whether you’ve got an expansive outdoor plot or just a few houseplants, Kristin will inspire you to grow even more with easy-to-tackle projects and horticultural know-how.


Spring is here, and with it the anticipation of more plant projects both indoors and out. With daylight lingering longer, no matter where you live, it’s hard to want to stay indoors any longer than you need to. Right now I’m harvesting the remainder of my winter greens and tinkering with them in the kitchen, starting seeds, and focusing on the new delicious season ahead (I see you, tomatoes!). I guess you could say for most gardeners it’s go time—aka, the most exciting (and busiest) time of the year.

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Curtains, Blinds, or Both? Here’s How to Pick Window Treatments

If there’s one thing to remember when outfitting a room, it isn’t that you need a cozy sofa and an appropriately-sized area rug. You also don’t have to keep reminding yourself to add a variety of light sources and verdant plants. These important detail…

If there’s one thing to remember when outfitting a room, it isn’t that you need a cozy sofa and an appropriately-sized area rug. You also don’t have to keep reminding yourself to add a variety of light sources and verdant plants. These important details aren’t necessarily going to slip your mind, but this sole component might: Choosing the right window treatments.

“We ask a lot from our windows,” says Nicholas Potts, an architect based in Washington, D.C. “There are times when lighting has to be controlled in certain ways, and other times when treatments are unnecessary.”

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What to Do with an Overload of Radishes

I think by now we all know the formula: Radishes + salt = appetizer elegance. Radishes + butter + baguette = snack time nirvana. Radishes + rustic farm table + screen-printed textiles = a food photographer’s dream.But what if you’re on your 100th radis…

I think by now we all know the formula: Radishes + salt = appetizer elegance. Radishes + butter + baguette = snack time nirvana. Radishes + rustic farm table + screen-printed textiles = a food photographer's dream.

But what if you're on your 100th radish bunch of the summer and these peppery gems need to play a greater role? More than something to tide us over between meals, more than just a garnish? What if a bundle of radishes on its own must be tonight’s vegetable?

CSA subscribers, prolific gardeners, and enthusiastic market-goers alike know this issue all too well. Sure, radishes and butter and salt are made for each other, but come mid-summer, even the most striking ombre roots begin to lose their luster.

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Why You’ll Find Marzipan Goldfish on My Nowruz Table

Walk into an Iranian home during Nowruz, the Persian New Year that begins with the spring equinox, and you’ll be greeted by what may be an unusual sight: an altar laid with ritual objects, including a shock of green wheatgrass, a mirror and candles, an…

Walk into an Iranian home during Nowruz, the Persian New Year that begins with the spring equinox, and you’ll be greeted by what may be an unusual sight: an altar laid with ritual objects, including a shock of green wheatgrass, a mirror and candles, and seven dishes. Each dish holds a different food that starts with the letter “S”. But the most eye-catching item of all may be a bowl of live goldfish darting to and fro. In recent decades, the millions of goldfish bought for Nowruz have churned up controversy: After the holiday, they’re released into rivers and ponds where, for the most part, they die. To avoid this while still paying homage to tradition, I have a solution. Enter: marzipan goldfish, a harmless stand-in that’s edible to boot.

It’s unclear when the goldfish wiggled their way onto the Sofreh Haft Seen, the table of seven “S”s, the setting of which has been performed in Iran since at least Zoroastrian times. The table is a blueprint for the year ahead, with each item representing a desired quality like health, wealth, and love. Goldfish, signifying life, add a dramatic splash of color to the New Year table and are traditionally released into the wild after the celebration; however, they’re unlikely to survive the transition. Lately, many are coming up with creative ways to replace the live goldfish, whether with a plastic toy, a drawing, or even an orange in a bowl.

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How to Get Your Soil Ready for Gardening Season

I recently started thinking about what I’m going to plant in my garden this spring—it’s a nice mental escape from the current dreary New England weather—and as I’ve been researching different flowers and vegetables, I keep seeing references to “ideal s…

I recently started thinking about what I’m going to plant in my garden this spring—it’s a nice mental escape from the current dreary New England weather—and as I’ve been researching different flowers and vegetables, I keep seeing references to “ideal soil quality.” For example, the growing guides in Almanac always say things like, “Dahlias thrive in rich, well-drained soil. The pH level of your soil should be 6.5-7.0, slightly acidic.”

It makes sense that soil has a pH, but it’s never been something I took into consideration as I planted my garden. I’ve always considered soil quality to be “advanced gardener stuff”—after all, my plants grow just fine—but seeing repeated mentions of it has piqued my curiosity. As a result, I started reading about soil quality, plant pH, and soil testing, and eventually, even reached out to Vanessa Dawson, a gardening expert and CEO of Arber, an organic, non-toxic plant wellness company, for expert insights on soil quality and why it matters. Here’s what I learned.

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6 Ways to Repurpose Leftover Vanilla Bean Pods

Today, Guest Editor Dorie Greenspan is sharing five ways to capture every last drop of flavor from vanilla bean pods.
Vanilla is earthy. It’s ethereal. It’s exotic. It’s indispensable in some recipes and, when added to others on a w…

Today, Guest Editor Dorie Greenspan is sharing five ways to capture every last drop of flavor from vanilla bean pods.

Vanilla is earthy. It's ethereal. It's exotic. It's indispensable in some recipes and, when added to others on a whim, seems essential. And it's expensive. At least the good stuff is, and it's the good stuff that you should be using. Always. If you're using vanilla extract, make sure it's pure. A good whiff should either make your head spin or compel you to dab a little behind your ears. And the beans...ah, the beans. Vanilla beans are the queens of the vanilla family. The ne plus ultra of flavoring.

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