A DIY Ottoman Makeover—With a Twist

As a designer, the question I’m asked most often is where I get my inspiration. And the answer is: from as many sources as possible—from fashion to food, music, and cinema. But some of my favorite inspirations have come from decorative objects I’ve acq…

As a designer, the question I’m asked most often is where I get my inspiration. And the answer is: from as many sources as possible—from fashion to food, music, and cinema. But some of my favorite inspirations have come from decorative objects I’ve acquired from local markets on my travels: Spanish tiles sourced from Valencia, brightly woven textiles bought at tiny shops in the side streets of Mexico City, and beaded necklaces from the beaches of Thailand. I love spotting the little details on some of these objects that I now have at home, and using those to spark ideas.

Over the past few years, I’ve been collecting mini woven baskets from bazaars as far as Spain and Thailand, and have wanted to design a piece of furniture around them. Well, actually one basket in particular—bought from a market in Brooklyn and made by a Ghanian weaver—that boasts a glorious color combination of deep yellow and teal. A few weeks ago, I came upon the perfect vessel for the project: an old ottoman in need of some love and repair.

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Here’s How to Properly Shut Down a Grill After a Barbecue

Inspired by conversations on the Food52 Hotline, we’re sharing tips and tricks that make navigating all of our kitchens easier and more fun.
Today: Shutting down a grill is just as important as starting it up. Read More >>

Inspired by conversations on the Food52 Hotline, we're sharing tips and tricks that make navigating all of our kitchens easier and more fun.

Today: Shutting down a grill is just as important as starting it up.

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How to Use Sourdough Discard in Any Recipe

Sourdough starter needs to be fed constantly to keep the cultures active. But if you add more flour and water today, then more flour and water tomorrow—and on and on—you’ll end up with a starter big enough to occupy your kitchen. That’s where discard c…

Sourdough starter needs to be fed constantly to keep the cultures active. But if you add more flour and water today, then more flour and water tomorrow—and on and on—you’ll end up with a starter big enough to occupy your kitchen. That’s where discard comes in: the portion of starter you, well, discard before feeding.

But don’t interpret discard as throwaway. For starters (pun intended), it’s a matter of food waste. Small amounts of discard swiftly add up in the trash, compost bin, or drain, especially if you feed your starter daily. Why toss something that you can put to good use?

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You’re Just 3 Ingredients Away From the Best Corn on the Cob

Nothing should have to be confusing about corn.
But your mom may have told you to boil it for ten minutes; your mother-in-law, for seven. Your dad may have let it roll on the stove until he remembered it. There’s been an age-old debate on the bes…

Nothing should have to be confusing about corn.

But your mom may have told you to boil it for ten minutes; your mother-in-law, for seven. Your dad may have let it roll on the stove until he remembered it. There’s been an age-old debate on the best way to cook corn on the cob – and, at the center, how long to boil it.

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Itching to DIY? Here Are All the Tools You’ll Need to Get Started.

This past year was a real make-lemonade-out-of-lemons situation for me. The lemon: a global pandemic that forced us to spend all our time indoors and make peace with our homes being our entire worlds. The lemonade: making the 500-square-foot apartment …

This past year was a real make-lemonade-out-of-lemons situation for me. The lemon: a global pandemic that forced us to spend all our time indoors and make peace with our homes being our entire worlds. The lemonade: making the 500-square-foot apartment I share with my husband feel bigger than it is.

I’ve bought more tools and done more home DIY projects in the last year than in the six years I’ve lived on my own. And I’m not the only one! A friend that once sat through a wine-and-paint event like she was having her teeth pulled out at the dentist now calls me regularly to discuss her DIY projects.

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What to Do With Crunchy, Sweet & Spicy Peppers

It’s the season of overflowing market bags, heavy CSA boxes, and gardens run amok. Alexandra Stafford of Alexandra Cooks is showing us how to store, prep, and make the most of the bounty, without wasting a scrap.
Today: How to store…

It's the season of overflowing market bags, heavy CSA boxes, and gardens run amok. Alexandra Stafford of Alexandra Cooks is showing us how to store, prep, and make the most of the bounty, without wasting a scrap.

Today: How to store, prep, and make the most of the season's pepper crop, whether you have just a handful or you picked so many you should be called Peter Piper. Start with Yotam Ottolenghi's marinated pepper salad.

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6 Knife Mistakes We’re Never, Ever Making Again

We’re teaming up with Shun Cutlery to celebrate the launch of their brand-new Premier Grey Knife Collection, which has all the slicers and dicers you need to tackle any kitchen task. Here, we’re sharing the knife mistakes we’ve made—and learned from—ov…

We’re teaming up with Shun Cutlery to celebrate the launch of their brand-new Premier Grey Knife Collection, which has all the slicers and dicers you need to tackle any kitchen task. Here, we’re sharing the knife mistakes we’ve made—and learned from—over the years, so you can keep your own blades in tip-top shape.


My cramped galley kitchen is filled to the brim with all sorts of cookware, tools, storage containers, pantry goods, and gadgets. Some of those things I reach for on the daily (nonstick skillet and electric kettle: check and check), while a couple I’m ashamed to say I’ve used just a handful of times. (Vegetable spiralizer, it was fun while it lasted.)

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What Is Durum Wheat (& How the Heck Do You Bake With It)

The Perfect Loaf is a column from software engineer-turned-bread expert (and Food52’s Resident Bread Baker), Maurizio Leo. Maurizio is here to show us all things naturally leavened, enriched, yeast-risen, you name it—basically, every vehicle to slather…

The Perfect Loaf is a column from software engineer-turned-bread expert (and Food52's Resident Bread Baker), Maurizio Leo. Maurizio is here to show us all things naturally leavened, enriched, yeast-risen, you name it—basically, every vehicle to slather on a lot of butter. Today, how to turn high-protein durum flour into a golden loaf of bread.


If you’re a fresh pasta-maker, chances are high you’re familiar with durum wheat. Though the species is most commonly used to make pasta, it’s also an excellent choice to incorporate into bread. It’s a hard wheat—hence the name durum, which is Latin for “hard,”—and is so-called because of the strength of the durum berry itself, requiring significant force to mill. The grain has a high protein percentage, but the gluten quality in durum flour doesn’t have the same gas-trapping characteristics as traditional wheat. This means when using even finely-milled durum flour. The resulting bread will have a tighter, more cake-like crumb, or internal structure, somewhat akin to a loaf of whole wheat bread (as opposed to a super-light loaf with large inner holes, like a country loaf). Though there are visual and textural differences to a loaf of bread made durum wheat, there’s no compromise made: The color, aroma, and flavors from durum are all quite striking when used in bread, yielding a more rustic loaf but nonetheless delicious.

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7 Decor DIYs That Will Instantly Refresh Your Home

For many, the first couple of months of a new year are synonymous with resolutions: saving money, spending more time with friends and family, scoring that promotion etc. 2021 is shaping up to be a bit different. Hunkered down and (still) social distanc…

For many, the first couple of months of a new year are synonymous with resolutions: saving money, spending more time with friends and family, scoring that promotion etc. 2021 is shaping up to be a bit different. Hunkered down and (still) social distancing, many homeowners and renters say this year is about getting their hands dirty—and keeping their minds occupied—by focusing on the four walls around them.

Beau Ciolino and his fiancé Matthew Armato are no exception. Since moving into their New Orleans, LA Victorian a year ago, the couple has been decorating against the grain—and sharing the process with the followers of their popular Instagram and blog Probably This. Their latest über modern addition? A DIY fluted table made from PVC pipe and birch plywood that’s been drenched in limewash to help it resemble stone.

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DIY Sachets for Sweet-Smelling Sock Drawers

As we’re sure you well know, the months of February and March can easily stretch into what feels like a never-ending winter, especially when warm, teasing days poke through just to be dashed by a forecast of snow the next. One way to make them fe…

As we’re sure you well know, the months of February and March can easily stretch into what feels like a never-ending winter, especially when warm, teasing days poke through just to be dashed by a forecast of snow the next. One way to make them feel instantly less bleak? A breezy little assembly-line craft, and one that’ll (physically) warm your cold, winter hands.

These sweet-smelling handmade sachets are just the thing to spruce up your unmentionables drawer and air out stuffy closets—smaller ones are kind of like boxes of baking soda in their ability to stave off stale odors lingering in last season’s clothes. Not only that, but larger versions can be popped in the microwave for about a minute and act as the world’s best-smelling heating pad for your snow-shovel backache. Come summer, these little guys can also be stashed in the freezer to relieve the back of your neck from sweltering temps, as well as provide gentle cold relief to strained muscles. 

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