We Shared a Recipe for a Green Bean Sandwich & People Got Upset

Crunchy, crispy, and vibrant as can be, green beans are practically one of the seven wonders of the world. Right? Right. We’re obsessed with them year-round, but especially during spring and summer, when they’re at their peak (like…right now!). But frankly, the same dish of sautéed green beans with slivered almonds and lemon zest can get a little boring time and time again. We’re always looking for new ways to highlight seasonal produce to change things up a bit. Food editor Emma Laperruque does this time and time again, asking questions like “What If Latkes Were Made With…Asparagus?”) and baking feta with fresh strawberries. Leave it to recipe developer and frequent Food52 contributor Caroline Lange to come up with a totally new and innovative way to serve green beans—in the form of a sandwich!

To make this beautiful bite, slices of focaccia are topped with the slices of mozzarella and are baked until the bread is toasted and cheese has melted. Then, a generous scoop of the marinated oily, vinegar-y beans are piled high on the bread for a vegetarian sandwich that balances the texture of creamy cheese, soft bread, and crisp beans. Simple and easy, right?

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Crunchy, crispy, and vibrant as can be, green beans are practically one of the seven wonders of the world. Right? Right. We’re obsessed with them year-round, but especially during spring and summer, when they’re at their peak (like…right now!). But frankly, the same dish of sautéed green beans with slivered almonds and lemon zest can get a little boring time and time again. We’re always looking for new ways to highlight seasonal produce to change things up a bit. Food editor Emma Laperruque does this time and time again, asking questions like “What If Latkes Were Made With...Asparagus?”) and baking feta with fresh strawberries. Leave it to recipe developer and frequent Food52 contributor Caroline Lange to come up with a totally new and innovative way to serve green beans—in the form of a sandwich!

To make this beautiful bite, slices of focaccia are topped with the slices of mozzarella and are baked until the bread is toasted and cheese has melted. Then, a generous scoop of the marinated oily, vinegar-y beans are piled high on the bread for a vegetarian sandwich that balances the texture of creamy cheese, soft bread, and crisp beans. Simple and easy, right?

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Is a Hot Dog a Sandwich? The Food52 Editorial Team Weighs In.

“Are hot dogs sandwiches?”

It’s the kind of question that can make your blood boil, raise your voice a few octaves higher than you knew possible, and summon strong opinions from even the shyest snacker in your friend group. Ahead of the July 4th weeke…

“Are hot dogs sandwiches?”

It’s the kind of question that can make your blood boil, raise your voice a few octaves higher than you knew possible, and summon strong opinions from even the shyest snacker in your friend group. Ahead of the July 4th weekend and the infamous Nathan’s Hot Dog Eating Contest held each year on New York’s Coney Island (I’m rooting for you, as always, Joey Chestnut), outdoor furniture retailer RTAOutdoorLiving.com surveyed 1,000 individuals in an attempt to settle the debate with no end. Reader: the results may be disturbing, so proceed at your own risk.

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Marche des Producteurs de Pays

This week France rather quietly announced that visitors from the U.S. and Canada were allowed to come to the country without any restrictions. Things are still moving in the direction of getting back to normal, and while last year is still sort of a haze to me, I believe the markets in Paris remained open the entire time, operating under different conditions. Outdoor markets are…

This week France rather quietly announced that visitors from the U.S. and Canada were allowed to come to the country without any restrictions. Things are still moving in the direction of getting back to normal, and while last year is still sort of a haze to me, I believe the markets in Paris remained open the entire time, operating under different conditions. Outdoor markets are extremely important in France and, of course, pre-dated les supermarchés which are now everywhere and have more agreeable hours – some are now even open on Sundays, which was controversial when it happened. But the outdoor markets take place six days a week in Paris, and in a country where holidays and vacations, and Sundays, are sacred, they remain open no matter what, even on Christmas, Easter, and New Year’s Day.

The outdoor markets are an integral part of French life and while in Paris there are over 100 marchés alimentaires (food markets), many of the stands are run by négotiants, or middle-men and women, who get their fruits, vegetables, meats, poultry, and fish from Rungis, the wholesale market outside of the city. There are many small farms in France but many stay, and sell, only in their regions due to their size. So I’m always happy when I see signs posted about an upcoming Marché des Producteurs de Pays, where you can buy things directly from the growers and producers, who bring their foods to the city.

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chickpea pan bagnat

When I was in high school and we were finally allowed to go off-grounds for lunch, we often went to a local deli where my friends would get various sandwiches with turkey, salami, ham, or all of the above, plus, lettuce, tomato, onions, vinega…

When I was in high school and we were finally allowed to go off-grounds for lunch, we often went to a local deli where my friends would get various sandwiches with turkey, salami, ham, or all of the above, plus, lettuce, tomato, onions, vinegar and oil and I, a vegetarian in a place baffled by this, would get a the same but with cheese instead. I have thought about this sandwich and what it did well — salt, pepper, vinegar, oil, crunch — and what it did poorly — a stack of tasteless sliced deli cheese as filler — for way too long in the years (and decades, sigh) since because I still love a sandwich full of vegetables, but find most vegetable sandwiches very disappointing, either heavy with cheese (and I love cheese, but not, like, an inch of it) or overcooked, under-seasoned vegetables. Why not avocado and crispy kale? Why not hummus, marinated cucumbers and carrots? Why not… make it for yourself, Deb? Which brings us, as ever, back here today.

a few good sandwich things

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Mexico’s Most Popular Sandwich Is Also the Easiest Make at Home

On a quiet corner in the Roma neighborhood of Mexico City, the employees at Tortería Los Güeros, a torta restaurant open since 1974, are going through their opening routine. Genaro Aburto, an owner and torta maker, bends downs to drag a pla…

On a quiet corner in the Roma neighborhood of Mexico City, the employees at Tortería Los Güeros, a torta restaurant open since 1974, are going through their opening routine. Genaro Aburto, an owner and torta maker, bends downs to drag a plastic tub into view. “Today is the day we make the pickles,” he says, nodding at the mass of mottled red and green jalapeños bobbing in water. “We’ve already got the carrots, onion, and cauliflower cooking.”

Aburto is just one among legions of torta makers in the capital, those dedicated to assembling Mexico’s most popular sandwich. Though tortas have been eaten for more than a century now, wheat consumption was, at first, fiercely resisted. When the Spanish arrived in the early 1500s carrying wheat, they found an entrenched culture of corn that had been in place for more than 2,000 years. The Spanish created smear campaigns to denigrate corn while proselytizing the purity of wheat; when the taste for bread still failed to catch on, they forced indigenous populations to grow and process it. Hundreds of years later, bread has not supplanted the corn tortilla, though it is eaten as sweet pastry in the mornings, served alongside stews for lunch, rolled into tortillas in the north, and used to sandwich cold cuts and proteins in the ubiquitous, pedestrian torta.

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The Joy of a 5-Minute Pickle Sandwich

A Big Little Recipe has the smallest-possible ingredient list and big everything else: flavor, creativity, wow factor. That means five ingredients or fewer—not including water, salt, black pepper, and certain fats (like oil and butter), since we’re gue…

A Big Little Recipe has the smallest-possible ingredient list and big everything else: flavor, creativity, wow factor. That means five ingredients or fewer—not including water, salt, black pepper, and certain fats (like oil and butter), since we're guessing you have those covered. Psst, did you hear we’re coming out with a cookbook? We’re coming out with a cookbook!


In the before times, I was a lunch planner. Which is to say, more organized (okay, uptight) than a dinner planner, albeit not as much as a breakfast planner, or even a snack planner, though I’m not even sure if these exist.

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Tuna Melt

It’s funny some of the dos and don’ts that people have come up with around food. Things like that you shouldn’t wash button mushrooms, that you should drink red wine with cheese, and that you shouldn’t let soap anywhere near your cast iron skillet. Nope, nope, and nope. Not sure where these things get started, but people grab the ball and run with it without…

It’s funny some of the dos and don’ts that people have come up with around food. Things like that you shouldn’t wash button mushrooms, that you should drink red wine with cheese, and that you shouldn’t let soap anywhere near your cast iron skillet. Nope, nope, and nope. Not sure where these things get started, but people grab the ball and run with it without turning around to realize they are completely off the field.

Another thing you hear a lot is that fish doesn’t go with cheese. In addition to Moules au Roquefort (mussels with Roquefort) in France, Shrimp Saganaki (with feta) from Greece, and Machas a la parmesana (clams with Parmesan) from Chile, the Tuna Melt is a popular sandwich in the States. However, I do draw the line at les sushis restaurants and decline the bœuf fromage brochette that comes with yakitori assortment plates in France, and ask if they can swap it for a second roasted duck. I love melted cheese, and I like sushi. I’m not sure I want them in the same meal, but à chacun son goût…to each their own taste.

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On Grief, Seasoning Skillets, & the Comfort of a BLT

Summer 2019. I have a new cast-iron skillet, and it needs seasoning. “Bacon,” my friends said. “Cook lots and lots of bacon.”

At first, I resisted. I’m not a bacon kind of girl, I reasoned. We didn’t cook it at all when I was growing up—even in a tho…

Summer 2019. I have a new cast-iron skillet, and it needs seasoning. “Bacon,” my friends said. “Cook lots and lots of bacon.”

At first, I resisted. I’m not a bacon kind of girl, I reasoned. We didn’t cook it at all when I was growing up—even in a thoroughly assimilated Jewish household, pork was a bit foreign. Plus, bacon was too fatty for my parents’ liking, even before they stopped eating meat altogether. I ate a whole strip of bacon once as a child, and later that day had a stomachache; I fancied the two connected, and for years I insisted that bacon wasn’t for me. Even now, in my 30s, my tastes largely mirror what I grew up eating: I prefer olive oil to butter, and low-fat milk to whole.

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Happiest Hanukkah From This Crispy Latke, Egg & Cheese Sandwich

Egg and cheese sandwiches are often just that: egg and cheese on a roll or bagel or toast. Just as often, they co-star a choose-your-own breakfast meat, be it bacon or sausage or ham. But arguably the most festive version, especially during Hanukkah, f…

Egg and cheese sandwiches are often just that: egg and cheese on a roll or bagel or toast. Just as often, they co-star a choose-your-own breakfast meat, be it bacon or sausage or ham. But arguably the most festive version, especially during Hanukkah, features a crispy, chewy latke.

The latke, egg, and cheese sandwich on house-baked challah from B&H Dairy in Manhattan’s East Village has technically been available for years, yet only just became a permanent menu item.

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The WFH Snack You Can Make (& Eat) Between Zoom Calls

We’ve partnered with Hood Cottage Cheese to share a few of our favorite ways their creamy, protein-rich cottage cheeses—like their savory Cottage Cheese with Cucumber and Dill—make for a delicious, speedy snack.

Working from home in pajamas, with yo…

We've partnered with Hood Cottage Cheese to share a few of our favorite ways their creamy, protein-rich cottage cheeses—like their savory Cottage Cheese with Cucumber and Dill—make for a delicious, speedy snack.


Working from home in pajamas, with your dog napping next to you: Once upon a time, that would’ve sounded luxuriously relaxing, right?

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