A Handy Guide to Homemade Sandwich Bread

The Perfect Loaf is a column from software engineer turned bread expert (and Food52’s Resident Bread Baker), Maurizio Leo. Maurizio is here to show us all things naturally leavened, enriched, yeast-risen, you name it—basically, every vehicle to slather…

The Perfect Loaf is a column from software engineer turned bread expert (and Food52's Resident Bread Baker), Maurizio Leo. Maurizio is here to show us all things naturally leavened, enriched, yeast-risen, you name it—basically, every vehicle to slather a lot of butter on. Today, he’s discussing sandwich loaves, and whether the best bread comes from Pullman pans or traditional loaf pans.


My pantry is stocked to the brim with baking pans of all shapes, sizes, and materials. I have long rectangular pans with straight sides, medium pans with tapered sides, and even smaller pans the size of two sticks of butter. Materials range from my hefty cast-iron Staub loaf pan to light aluminum or aluminized steel (cast iron makes the crust nice and crispy, while aluminum goes in the thinner direction). With so many baking pan choices, it can be challenging to determine which pan to use. So let’s look at a few different choices and what they bring to your baking arsenal—and even take a look at my all-time favorite pan for just about everything: the Pullman pan.

Read More >>

Is a Patty Melt a Hamburger or a Sandwich? Either Way, It’s the Best

I’ve realized that the population of my Brooklyn neighborhood, where I’ve lived for a decade, can be divided into buffalo chicken salad people and patty melt people. I put myself in the latter category. One of my favorites was the patty melt they serve…

I’ve realized that the population of my Brooklyn neighborhood, where I've lived for a decade, can be divided into buffalo chicken salad people and patty melt people. I put myself in the latter category. One of my favorites was the patty melt they served at beloved local spot MeMe’s Diner, which closed its doors in 2020 but has been reborn as K.I.T., a natural-wine spot that also sells excellent baked goods.

But here’s the question: Is the patty melt a sandwich or a hamburger? Because if it’s a burger, then we enter a minefield of issues that people just love to debate when it comes to things you can grill in the summertime and put between a bun.

Read More >>

To Me, This Ingredient Will Always Be Better Than Bacon

A Big Little Recipe has the smallest-possible ingredient list and big everything else: flavor, creativity, wow factor. That means five ingredients or fewer—not including water, salt, black pepper, and certain fats (like oil and butter), since we’re gue…

A Big Little Recipe has the smallest-possible ingredient list and big everything else: flavor, creativity, wow factor. That means five ingredients or fewer—not including water, salt, black pepper, and certain fats (like oil and butter), since we're guessing you have those covered. Psst, did you hear we’re coming out with a cookbook? We’re coming out with a cookbook!


Depending on which New Jerseyan you ask, the most magical pork product of all time is either called “Taylor ham” or “pork roll.” The former is more common in the north chunk of the state (that’s me). The latter, more popular in the central and south. In any case, neither is the full name—as a 1908 advertisement read, “LOOK OUT For Imitators...SEE That You Get the Genuine TAYLOR Pork Roll.”

Read More >>

Classic Shrimp Rolls

This shrimp roll recipe takes everything that’s great about a lobster roll…and makes it with shrimp! Serve it on a…

A Couple Cooks – Recipes worth repeating.

This shrimp roll recipe takes everything that’s great about a lobster roll…and makes it with shrimp! Serve it on a warm, toasted bun.

Shrimp Roll

Who doesn’t love a lobster roll? They’re a pinnacle of deliciousness: that savory, creamy tender filling encased by a warm, buttery bun. Here in the Midwest though, lobster is a bit of a delicacy. So we wondered…why not make it with shrimp? Introducing…the Shrimp Roll! It takes all the goodness of a lobster roll and makes it with more economical, easy to find shrimp. We served it for a dinner party with corn on the cob and watermelon sorbet, and everyone raved.

Ingredients in a shrimp roll

Researching this recipe, we found that the filling for a shrimp roll is actually a shrimp salad. Not a green salad, mind you: the 1950’s mayo-based salad that’s more familiar with tuna or egg. It’s got crunchy veggies, mayo and just the right amount of savory, creamy sauce. Here’s what you’ll need:

  • Shrimp
  • Celery
  • Green onions
  • Chopped chives or dill
  • Mayonnaise
  • Lemon juice
  • Dijon mustard
  • Old Bay
  • Salt and pepper
Shrimp Roll recipe

The key: a butter-toasted split top bun

What makes a shrimp roll? The warm, buttery toasted bun. Do not skip the step! We were curious and tried it in a plain old bun. Don’t waste your time on it, folks. It doesn’t taste like a shrimp roll. Here’s what you’ll need to pull this off:

  • Grab split top hot dog buns. Split top buns are loaded from the top down, and are customary in a lobster roll. You’ll need them to make a killer shrimp roll recipe!
  • Melt butter in a large skillet over medium heat. Place the buns cut-side down into the skillet and cook for 20 to 30 seconds until browned.
  • Flip the buns. Then flip and continue frying about 10 to 15 seconds on the other side. They come out beautifully buttery and toasted. Perfection!

This shrimp roll recipe makes 6 to 8 sandwiches

Most of our recipes here at A Couple Cooks are for 4 servings. But this shrimp roll recipe is so good, we like making it serve 6 to 8 sandwiches. Here’s why you may want to make a big batch:

  • The shrimp rolls are so good, you may want to eat two. Or you can eat the extra filling without a bun. That’s what we did at our dinner party!
  • Leftovers also save well. Extra filling lasts up to 3 days refrigerated.
Shrimp Roll

Boil the shrimp, or it’s ideal for leftover cooked

You can use fresh shrimp for this shrimp roll recipe, or it’s actually a great use for leftover cooked shrimp! Boiling is the quickest method to get from raw shrimp to cold shrimp, but you can use whatever cooking method you like.

  • Boil the shrimp for 2 minutes, then remove to an ice bath. The ice bath stops the cooking immediately, and gets the shrimp cooled down and ready for the salad.
  • Or, use leftover cooked shrimp. This is actually a great use for shrimp leftovers, which can be unappetizing on their own. Got leftover shrimp cocktail? Make shrimp rolls!

The secret spice? Old Bay

One last thing about this shrimp roll recipe. It’s nice to use this secret seasoning if you have it. Old Bay! It’s not required, but Old Bay is a seasoning blend that’s traditionally used in New England seafood recipes (like a shrimp boil). We added a hint of it to this recipe, and rounded it out perfectly.

Where to find Old Bay? In the US, you can find Old Bay in your grocery store in the spices aisle. Or, you can buy Old Bay online or make homemade Old Bay!

Shrimp roll recipe

More shrimp recipes

Love shrimp? (Us too.) Here are a few more tasty recipes to add to your repertoire:

This shrimp roll recipe is…

Pescatarian and dairy free. For gluten-free, use gluten-free buns.

Print

Shrimp Roll


  • Author: Sonja Overhiser
  • Prep Time: 25 minutes
  • Cook Time: 5 minutes
  • Total Time: 30 minutes
  • Yield: 6 to 8

Description

This shrimp roll recipe takes everything that’s great about a lobster roll…and makes it with shrimp! Serve it on a warm, toasted bun.


Ingredients

  • 1 1/2 pound medium or small shrimp, peeled and deveined*
  • 2 ribs celery
  • 2 green onions
  • 2 tablespoons finely chopped chives or dill
  • 5 tablespoons mayonnaise
  • 1 tablespoon lemon juice
  • 1 ½ tablespoons Dijon mustard
  • ½ teaspoon Old Bay (optional)
  • ½ teaspoon kosher salt
  • Fresh ground black pepper
  • 6 to 8 split top hot dog buns
  • 2 tablespoons butter (or coconut oil or vegan butter for dairy free)

Instructions

  1. Boil the shrimp: Boil 2 quarts of water, seasoned with ½ teaspoon kosher salt. Add the shrimp and cook about 2 minutes (more or less time depending on size of shrimp), until bright pink and cooked through. Remove the shrimp with a slotted spoon and place it directly into an ice water bath to stop the cooking.
  2. Chop the shrimp: Remove the shrimp from the ice bath with a slotted spoon. Pat the shrimp dry with a few paper towels as you place them onto the cutting board. Then chop the shrimp into bite-sized pieces.
  3. Make the filling: Finely mince the celery and thinly slice the green onions. Finely chop the chives. Stir together the chopped shrimp with the celery, green onion, chives, mayonnaise, lemon juice, Dijon mustard, Old Bay, kosher salt, and fresh ground black pepper.
  4. Toast the buns: Melt the butter in a large skillet over medium heat. Place the buns cut-side down into the skillet and cook for 20 to 30 seconds until browned. Then flip and continue frying about 10 to 15 seconds on the other side.
  5. Serve: Place the shrimp filling into the buns and serve. Leftover filling keeps for up to 3 days in the refrigerator. 

Notes

*You can also use leftover cooked shrimp for this recipe: it’s an ideal use!

  • Category: Main Dish
  • Method: Stovetop
  • Cuisine: Seafood

Keywords: Shrimp roll

A Couple Cooks - Recipes worth repeating.

The Enduring Magnificence of the Publix Sub

We all have a food that speaks to our comfort and makes us feel all warm and fuzzy inside. For me, this is most commonly wrapped in nostalgia. I constantly crave the tastes and smells (well, some of them) of my childhood, those that brought me simple j…

We all have a food that speaks to our comfort and makes us feel all warm and fuzzy inside. For me, this is most commonly wrapped in nostalgia. I constantly crave the tastes and smells (well, some of them) of my childhood, those that brought me simple joy during times of celebration, jubilation, or even heartbreak. And as a Floridian, that joy comes in the form of a sandwich from a popular grocery chain. That's right, I'm talking about the wonders of the Publix submarine sandwich—affectionately known as a "Pub Sub."

I know what you’re probably thinking: Get a life, dude. It’s a sandwich. But one look at the internet will prove that I’m absolutely not alone in sharing this sentiment. There are love letters, Twitter fan accounts, and even Reddit forums dedicated to the meat, cheese, bread, and condiment combo. There was even outrage when free samples of these ingredients were seemingly discontinued at certain store locations, only to be reinstated immediately and woven back into Publix’s culture of generosity and appeasing demanding customers. But beyond that, what exactly makes a Pub Sub far superior than the norm? I had to find out, for you and for science.

Read More >>

Molly Baz’s Tuna Sandwich Ruined Us for All Other Tuna Sandwiches

If you love cross-back aprons and salt, and you know what a Cae Sal is, odds are you’re a fan of Molly Baz, recipe developer and the author of Cook This Book. Baz is also a sandwich aficionado, and she’s getting ready to share her wisdom with all of us…

If you love cross-back aprons and salt, and you know what a Cae Sal is, odds are you’re a fan of Molly Baz, recipe developer and the author of Cook This Book. Baz is also a sandwich aficionado, and she’s getting ready to share her wisdom with all of us, via The Sandwich Universe, her new podcast with Declan Bond, on the Food52 Podcast Network. We were able to score a little preview of the first few episodes of the pod and find out some of Baz’s thoughts on sandwiches—plus, we’re sharing a killer tuna sandwich recipe from Cook This Book! Who’s ready for lunch?

Tuna Sandwich

Fans of Baz know she loves tuna (so much so that she named her dog after it!). Naturally, there’s a tuna sandwich in Cook This Book, but it’s not the tuna salad sandwich you’d find in a lunchbox. Though there is a time and a place for those as well, Baz’s dream tuna sandwich is a bit more exciting. “This was originally destined to be a niçoise salad, my attempt at taking a fresh look at the beloved French classic of tuna, olive, potato, and egg,” writes Baz in the recipe headnote. She swiftly realized she couldn’t improve on something that’s already perfect, so she switched gears: “However, if you take all of those same flavors and rearrange them in the form of a sandwich (sorta à la pan bagnat), then I do have reason to get involved." And thus, her Niçoise Sando With Smashed Eggs & Black Olive Mayo was born. Spoiler alert: there are potato chips inside.

Read More >>

We Shared a Recipe for a Green Bean Sandwich & People Got Upset

Crunchy, crispy, and vibrant as can be, green beans are practically one of the seven wonders of the world. Right? Right. We’re obsessed with them year-round, but especially during spring and summer, when they’re at their peak (like…right now!). But frankly, the same dish of sautéed green beans with slivered almonds and lemon zest can get a little boring time and time again. We’re always looking for new ways to highlight seasonal produce to change things up a bit. Food editor Emma Laperruque does this time and time again, asking questions like “What If Latkes Were Made With…Asparagus?”) and baking feta with fresh strawberries. Leave it to recipe developer and frequent Food52 contributor Caroline Lange to come up with a totally new and innovative way to serve green beans—in the form of a sandwich!

To make this beautiful bite, slices of focaccia are topped with the slices of mozzarella and are baked until the bread is toasted and cheese has melted. Then, a generous scoop of the marinated oily, vinegar-y beans are piled high on the bread for a vegetarian sandwich that balances the texture of creamy cheese, soft bread, and crisp beans. Simple and easy, right?

Read More >>

Crunchy, crispy, and vibrant as can be, green beans are practically one of the seven wonders of the world. Right? Right. We’re obsessed with them year-round, but especially during spring and summer, when they’re at their peak (like…right now!). But frankly, the same dish of sautéed green beans with slivered almonds and lemon zest can get a little boring time and time again. We’re always looking for new ways to highlight seasonal produce to change things up a bit. Food editor Emma Laperruque does this time and time again, asking questions like “What If Latkes Were Made With...Asparagus?”) and baking feta with fresh strawberries. Leave it to recipe developer and frequent Food52 contributor Caroline Lange to come up with a totally new and innovative way to serve green beans—in the form of a sandwich!

To make this beautiful bite, slices of focaccia are topped with the slices of mozzarella and are baked until the bread is toasted and cheese has melted. Then, a generous scoop of the marinated oily, vinegar-y beans are piled high on the bread for a vegetarian sandwich that balances the texture of creamy cheese, soft bread, and crisp beans. Simple and easy, right?

Read More >>

Is a Hot Dog a Sandwich? The Food52 Editorial Team Weighs In.

“Are hot dogs sandwiches?”

It’s the kind of question that can make your blood boil, raise your voice a few octaves higher than you knew possible, and summon strong opinions from even the shyest snacker in your friend group. Ahead of the July 4th weeke…

“Are hot dogs sandwiches?”

It’s the kind of question that can make your blood boil, raise your voice a few octaves higher than you knew possible, and summon strong opinions from even the shyest snacker in your friend group. Ahead of the July 4th weekend and the infamous Nathan’s Hot Dog Eating Contest held each year on New York’s Coney Island (I’m rooting for you, as always, Joey Chestnut), outdoor furniture retailer RTAOutdoorLiving.com surveyed 1,000 individuals in an attempt to settle the debate with no end. Reader: the results may be disturbing, so proceed at your own risk.

Read More >>

Marche des Producteurs de Pays

This week France rather quietly announced that visitors from the U.S. and Canada were allowed to come to the country without any restrictions. Things are still moving in the direction of getting back to normal, and while last year is still sort of a haze to me, I believe the markets in Paris remained open the entire time, operating under different conditions. Outdoor markets are…

This week France rather quietly announced that visitors from the U.S. and Canada were allowed to come to the country without any restrictions. Things are still moving in the direction of getting back to normal, and while last year is still sort of a haze to me, I believe the markets in Paris remained open the entire time, operating under different conditions. Outdoor markets are extremely important in France and, of course, pre-dated les supermarchés which are now everywhere and have more agreeable hours – some are now even open on Sundays, which was controversial when it happened. But the outdoor markets take place six days a week in Paris, and in a country where holidays and vacations, and Sundays, are sacred, they remain open no matter what, even on Christmas, Easter, and New Year’s Day.

The outdoor markets are an integral part of French life and while in Paris there are over 100 marchés alimentaires (food markets), many of the stands are run by négotiants, or middle-men and women, who get their fruits, vegetables, meats, poultry, and fish from Rungis, the wholesale market outside of the city. There are many small farms in France but many stay, and sell, only in their regions due to their size. So I’m always happy when I see signs posted about an upcoming Marché des Producteurs de Pays, where you can buy things directly from the growers and producers, who bring their foods to the city.

Continue Reading Marche des Producteurs de Pays...

chickpea pan bagnat

When I was in high school and we were finally allowed to go off-grounds for lunch, we often went to a local deli where my friends would get various sandwiches with turkey, salami, ham, or all of the above, plus, lettuce, tomato, onions, vinega…

When I was in high school and we were finally allowed to go off-grounds for lunch, we often went to a local deli where my friends would get various sandwiches with turkey, salami, ham, or all of the above, plus, lettuce, tomato, onions, vinegar and oil and I, a vegetarian in a place baffled by this, would get a the same but with cheese instead. I have thought about this sandwich and what it did well — salt, pepper, vinegar, oil, crunch — and what it did poorly — a stack of tasteless sliced deli cheese as filler — for way too long in the years (and decades, sigh) since because I still love a sandwich full of vegetables, but find most vegetable sandwiches very disappointing, either heavy with cheese (and I love cheese, but not, like, an inch of it) or overcooked, under-seasoned vegetables. Why not avocado and crispy kale? Why not hummus, marinated cucumbers and carrots? Why not… make it for yourself, Deb? Which brings us, as ever, back here today.

a few good sandwich things

Read more »