Chewy Lemon Sugar Cookies

These Chewy Lemon Sugar Cookies are soft, perfectly chewy, and flavored with plenty of lemon zest and juice. Your family will love these bright sugar cookies! I can’t tell you how many times I’ve made these Chewy Lemon Sugar Cookies in the past 10 years, but it’s been a lot. I originally posted this recipe …

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These Chewy Lemon Sugar Cookies are soft, perfectly chewy, and flavored with plenty of lemon zest and juice. Your family will love these bright sugar cookies!

Stack of chewy lemon sugar cookies. The top cookie has a bite taken out of it.

I can’t tell you how many times I’ve made these Chewy Lemon Sugar Cookies in the past 10 years, but it’s been a lot.

I originally posted this recipe in 2010 after finding it on Rock Recipes and after 10+ years, I thought it was time to share them again with new photos and updated text.

These Chewy Lemon Cookies are simple to make and bursting with lemon flavor, which in my opinion makes them the perfect cookie for summer!

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Betcha Didn’t Know All of These Were Stone Fruits

Whether you’re wandering around in a farmers market or passing through a section of the grocery store, odds are you’ve seen the term “stone fruit” tossed around near the peaches and plums. You put your keen mind to the task and gather that the term is …

Whether you’re wandering around in a farmers market or passing through a section of the grocery store, odds are you’ve seen the term “stone fruit” tossed around near the peaches and plums. You put your keen mind to the task and gather that the term is referencing a fruit (great start) with a, well, stone-like pit. Nailed it! But is there more to the concept? What is a stone fruit, exactly?

What is a stone fruit?

We’ve already gone over the obvious: Stone fruits are those with pits in the center. Officially, they’re fruits with a fleshy exterior known as the mesocarp (covered with a skin, or exocarp) that encases a stone or pit (the shell of which is a hardened endocarp with a seed inside). Also known as drupes, this category includes peaches, plums, cherries, nectarines, apricots, and pluots.

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12 Fruit Desserts to Make With Your Farmers Market Haul

When it comes to fruit desserts, there really are no rules. Toss peaches into pie, blend blueberries into ice cream. Arrange cherries in cobbler, layer plums in a crumble. (Should I stop? You get it.)

Jason Schreiber definitely gets it. His cookbook, …

When it comes to fruit desserts, there really are no rules. Toss peaches into pie, blend blueberries into ice cream. Arrange cherries in cobbler, layer plums in a crumble. (Should I stop? You get it.)

Jason Schreiber definitely gets it. His cookbook, Fruit Cake, is a celebration of (you guessed it!) cakes that feature fruit. From tea and snack cakes that are just as welcome at 11 a.m. as they are at 10 p.m, to multilayered, custard-filled, and cream-topped showstoppers, the book is filled with fruit desserts. There are plenty of formal cakes, like Coconut Pound Cake and Hazelnut Plum Snacking Cake, but also fun variations on a theme, like Cranberry Pecan Muffins and Strawberry Tamales de Dulce. We’re talking fruit desserts so dang vibrant, you'll find yourself seized with the urge to run to the nearest farmers market and buy a bushel of whatever’s in season—because there’s probably a recipe in here for a treat featuring whichever fruit you come back with.

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Lemon Raspberry Scones

Sweet, springy Lemon Raspberry Scones make a delectable way to start your day. Paired your morning coffee or tea, they’re the boost you need to kick your day into overdrive! Even though Ohio weather is pretty much the worst – I mean it’s 39 degrees as I type this – I am finally starting to …

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Sweet, springy Lemon Raspberry Scones make a delectable way to start your day. Paired your morning coffee or tea, they’re the boost you need to kick your day into overdrive!

Close up of glazed lemon raspberry scones on a wire cooling rack

Even though Ohio weather is pretty much the worst – I mean it’s 39 degrees as I type this – I am finally starting to see little glimmers of spring even though the weatherman said there’s a chance of flurries next week.

Come on, Mother Nature it is MAY.

I even went against my better judgement and planted a bunch of Superbells this past weekend. And now I am just over here hoping that I don’t have to cover them due to said flurries.

But despite the cold temps and dreary skies, I am craving all things sweet, tart and summery. And let me tell you, even if the weather is less than ideal where you’re located, these Lemon Raspberry Scones are sure to brighter up your day and maybe even your mood!

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Watergate Salad

Watergate Salad is loaded with pistachio pudding, crushed pineapple, miniature marshmallows, and pecans. It’s perfect for a Spring get-together or mid-week dessert. Growing up, salads that weren’t really salads were a staple at my Nana’s house. From Ambrosia Salad to Strawberry Pretzel Salad – these were the salads that I looked forward to at family …

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Watergate Salad is loaded with pistachio pudding, crushed pineapple, miniature marshmallows, and pecans. It’s perfect for a Spring get-together or mid-week dessert.

Three small serving dishes filled with watergate salad set on a white platter

Growing up, salads that weren’t really salads were a staple at my Nana’s house. From Ambrosia Salad to Strawberry Pretzel Salad – these were the salads that I looked forward to at family gatherings, and Watergate Salad was no exception.

Nana and her friends always had their go-to recipes that they were famous for and could whip them up in no time flat for a church function, ailing friend, or family get-together. 

Nana was known for her cheesecake – usually cherry cheesecake, but switched up with other pie fillings depending on the season. Strawberries during spring, and lemon during the summer months.

Nana’s friend, Anita, always made an amazingly fluffy pistachio “salad” known as Watergate Salad. We come from a family that loves anything with pistachio pudding, from pudding pie to Pistachio Pudding Parfaits, so naturally, I was obsessed with the stuff as a kid. 

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This Flower Arrangement Is Actually a Cheese Plate

I’ve built a community around sharing new and exciting ways to arrange cheese plates. Today, we’re taking it beyond the plate with this cheesy bouquet, perfect for Mother’s Day (but let’s be honest, any day will work). You may be thinking, “Marissa, wh…

I’ve built a community around sharing new and exciting ways to arrange cheese plates. Today, we’re taking it beyond the plate with this cheesy bouquet, perfect for Mother’s Day (but let’s be honest, any day will work). You may be thinking, “Marissa, why? Wasn’t cheese already good enough on a plate?” Sure, but I’m here to give you permission to more fully express your creativity when it comes to snacks: Have fun (dare I say, even play) with your food!

This idea was inspired by Edible Arrangements—you know, the bouquets of flower-shaped pineapple chunks and melon cubes. I say it’s time to level up with real flowers, and throw in a few cheese hearts, salami roses, and cracker leaves! The pairings here are thoughtful, not just random fruit that doesn’t really go together: Each skewer includes the ingredients for a perfect bite. Plus, this bouquet makes for a stunning centerpiece for your celebration. Let’s dive in.

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Raspberry Puff Pastry Tart

I’m a big fan of this puff pastry tart; it’s flaky crust and creamy center hit all the right notes. The raspberries add a burst of freshness, and are the perfect partner to the pastry cream topping. It’s a wonderful balance of flavors…

Raspberry Puff Pastry Tart

I’m a big fan of this puff pastry tart; it’s flaky crust and creamy center hit all the right notes. The raspberries add a burst of freshness, and are the perfect partner to the pastry cream topping. It’s a wonderful balance of flavors and textures, and would be delightful for Mother’s Day or Brunch.  You can make my homemade rough puff pastry, or use store-bought, whichever you prefer! Both will result in a delicious dessert.  Here’s my cheater method for this raspberry tart: Simply use one sheet of store-bought puff pastry (look for a puff pastry that has real butter in it for best results) + and this easy cream cheese filling. To make the cream cheese filling: In the bowl of a standing mixer fitted with a whisk attachment, whip 4 oz  [113 g] room temperature cream cheese, 4 tablespoons of granulated sugar, 1 teaspoon of pure vanilla extract, and a pinch of salt on medium-high until light and fluffy (1 to 2 minutes). Reduce the speed to low and add 1 cup [240 g] of  heavy cream in a slow, steady stream. Once the cream is incorporated, scrape down the mixer bowl, then increase the speed to medium-high […]

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A Newbie-Friendly Guide to Starting a Vegetable Garden

Jeni Afuso used to kill her houseplants. “For years, I thought I had a black thumb,” the Los Angeles-based food photographer told me over the phone. Turns out, she was wrong. Frustrated by the lack of regularity of certain kitchen staples at her market…

Jeni Afuso used to kill her houseplants. “For years, I thought I had a black thumb,” the Los Angeles-based food photographer told me over the phone. Turns out, she was wrong. Frustrated by the lack of regularity of certain kitchen staples at her market, the abundance of plastic used to wrap the ingredients she did buy on a regular basis, and the money she was spending on them, Afuso decided to start her own outdoor edible garden—previous failures be damned.

In a certain way, it’s no surprise things went better than expected. Gardening is in her blood. Her great-grandfather emigrated from Okinawa to Maui and ended up, as many Japanese immigrants did, working in the sugarcane fields. Her grandfather, who moved the whole family from Hawaii to Los Angeles in the mid-’50s, had his own gardening and landscaping business in the Valley. Her parents, though not professionals, grew food in their backyard. “I don’t remember my mom or dad ever buying green onions,” she says.

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Our New Favorite Charoset is from the Biggest Jewish Deli in Texas

Every year, in the days leading up to Passover, Ziggy Gruber makes up to 1,500 pounds of charoset. For comparison, my mom will make no more than a pound of the chopped fruit and nut mix, and there will be some left over. But when has Gruber ever done a…

Every year, in the days leading up to Passover, Ziggy Gruber makes up to 1,500 pounds of charoset. For comparison, my mom will make no more than a pound of the chopped fruit and nut mix, and there will be some left over. But when has Gruber ever done anything on a small scale?

David, who goes by Ziggy, is a third-generation deli man. His grandfather, Max, arrived in New York via Budapest at the turn of the century. He found work in delis across the city until 1927 when he opened his own, the Rialto Deli, with his brothers-in-law. The Rialto, they claim, was the first deli to open its doors on Broadway, just two years before the start of the Great Depression. Amidst the anguish of the era, the Rialto thrived, serving the likes of Ethel Merman and the Marx brothers. All three of them. Decades later, Ziggy’s father opened his own deli, on Madison Avenue and called it Genard’s. Once Ziggy came around, the family had moved, shuttered its prospects in the city, and opened a deli in decidedly quieter Spring Valley, New York.

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Everything You Need to Know About Tangy, Floral Loquats

I have this thing for picking things off trees and eating them. The fruit calls to me. I can spot the first fig ripening on a tree or find a wee wild strawberry growing under a carpet of green.

I have this thing for picking things off trees and eating them. The fruit calls to me. I can spot the first fig ripening on a tree or find a wee wild strawberry growing under a carpet of green.

Photo by Catherine Lamb

So when I caught a glimmer of orange in a tree while biking around my hometown of Charleston, you’re damn right I screeched to a halt right then and there to investigate.

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