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Tools of the Trade: 11 Essentials for Throwing the Ultimate Outdoor Grill Party

This article is part of an interview series called Tools of the Trade, a column featuring expert-approved tips, tricks, and product recommendations. Food52 earns an affiliate commission on qualifying purchases of the products we link to.

If you beli…

This article is part of an interview series called Tools of the Trade, a column featuring expert-approved tips, tricks, and product recommendations. Food52 earns an affiliate commission on qualifying purchases of the products we link to.


If you believe that boxed wine can't be high quality, Woody Hambrecht and Ross Dawkins are here to change that. Career winemakers and decades-long friends, the pair are the co-owners of Ami Ami, a direct-to-consumer brand focused on providing high-quality, eco-conscious, and delicious boxed (yes, boxed) French wine.

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Not Ready For Pumpkin Spice? Try Vanilla Salt.

Welcome to Plus One, a column by Food Editor Emily Ziemski where small-but-mighty additions—ingredients, sauces, toppings—that instantly upgrade whatever’s on the table are the star of the show. Today, a way to combat Late Summer Erasure™.

Summer—an…

Welcome to Plus One, a column by Food Editor Emily Ziemski where small-but-mighty additions—ingredients, sauces, toppings—that instantly upgrade whatever’s on the table are the star of the show. Today, a way to combat Late Summer Erasure™.


Summer—and outdoor grilling—season may technically still be in full swing, but it's hard to deny the whispers of fall decorations and the less... whispery declarations that pumpkin-spiced everything IS. BACK. (I get it! Please stop yelling at me, Dunkin' commercials.)

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Why We’re Marinating Just About Everything in Mayo

This article is a part of Mayo Week—seven days celebrating all things mayonnaise—presented in partnership by our friends at Primal Kitchen.
Mayonnaise is a savior in a spread, a miracle in a jar, a genie in a bottle. Besides decking out our sandwiches…

This article is a part of Mayo Week—seven days celebrating all things mayonnaise—presented in partnership by our friends at Primal Kitchen.

Mayonnaise is a savior in a spread, a miracle in a jar, a genie in a bottle. Besides decking out our sandwiches and dressing up our grain bowls, it makes the fluffiest pancakes, the fudgiest chocolate cake. It can even remove watermarks from tables, stickers from jars, mistakes from the past.

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11 New Recipes Our Community Loved in June

While May’s top recipes were all about enjoying those final days of spring, June’s are decidedly more summery. Burgers were a major winner over the past month (no surprise—it was just Burger Week), as were other grill-ready mains, from steak to cabbage…

While May’s top recipes were all about enjoying those final days of spring, June’s are decidedly more summery. Burgers were a major winner over the past month (no surprise—it was just Burger Week), as were other grill-ready mains, from steak to cabbage. It was a big month for our Residents, too. Cocktail expert Harper Fendler and rancher Mary Heffernan of Five Marys both joined the crew, sharing their recipes for perfect Manhattans and bacon marmalade-topped burgers, respectively.

In no particular order, here are 11 of June’s most popular recipes.

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Our 5 Best Skewer Recipes

Skewers—also known as kebabs, yakitori, souvlaki, satay, and brochettes—make grilling easier, more fun, and often more delicious. At their best, skewers are evenly cooked, deeply flavored, and served piled high on a platter near the grill—ready to be e…

Skewers—also known as kebabs, yakitori, souvlaki, satay, and brochettes—make grilling easier, more fun, and often more delicious. At their best, skewers are evenly cooked, deeply flavored, and served piled high on a platter near the grill—ready to be enjoyed outside with friends and a cold drink in hand. And while there’s no such thing as a bad skewer (we’ll eat anything off of a stick), some are better than others. Here are five of our favorite skewer-based recipes, plus everything you’ll need to make them.

The Right Skewers

Grilling with skewers shouldn’t require discarding an armory of miniature wooden swords into the trash after cooking. While wooden skewers are better than no skewers, the safety benefits of reusable, metal skewers simply make them the best option. Unlike their wooden counterparts, metal skewers never catch on fire, splinter, or—for some hellish reason—do both at the same time. Metal also doesn’t need to soak in water to become grill-safe—it’s born flame-ready.

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How to Grill a Great Steak Every. Single. Time.

When I was a line cook, I spent the majority of my time working the grill. On a nightly basis, I was responsible for not just a grill full of various types and cuts of meat—I also had to ensure that when they reached the dining room, they were cooked t…

When I was a line cook, I spent the majority of my time working the grill. On a nightly basis, I was responsible for not just a grill full of various types and cuts of meat—I also had to ensure that when they reached the dining room, they were cooked to each customer’s preferred internal temperature. It’s a lot to deal with, and when an expensive steak is involved, things become even more stressful. While grilling at that scale and level of precision never becomes truly easy, if you set up your steak and grill correctly, successful outcomes are much more feasible. With that in mind, here is everything you need to know in order to grill the perfect steak for you.

How To Prepare Steak For The Grill

Roughly twenty minutes before grilling a steak, you should remove the meat from the fridge and allow it to reach room temperature. This ensures that your steak will cook evenly, preventing the dreaded combination of an overcooked exterior and cold, raw center. According to J. Fox—owner of Manhattan butcher shop Hudson & Charles—it’s important to be mindful of food safety precautions while doing this. “You want to make sure the protein isn’t in the 40°F to 140°F range for more than two hours,” he says. “If the temperature outside is 90 degrees, that means no more than one hour sitting out of refrigeration.”

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The Genius Secret to Juicy Turkey Burgers (Chicken & Pork Burgers, Too)

This post contains products independently chosen (and loved) by our editors and writers. Food52 earns an affiliate commission on qualifying purchases of the products we link to.

Who among us hasn’t been burned by a dry turkey burger before? (Or chi…

This post contains products independently chosen (and loved) by our editors and writers. Food52 earns an affiliate commission on qualifying purchases of the products we link to.

Who among us hasn’t been burned by a dry turkey burger before? (Or chicken, or pork, or even beef, that time whoever was in charge of shopping went down a dark path and bought the 98% lean mix.) I had an especially dismal one just recently at the burger joint across the street from my apartment. Fool me, I don’t know, a hundred times?

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Inside Coney Island’s Hot Dog Wars

The setting was Coney Island in the early 1900s. The characters were inventive, shrewd, cutthroat, and aggressive. The story was meaty and juicy, with glitzy and glamorous celebrities influencing the plot. No, this is not a pitch for an HBO prestige dr…

The setting was Coney Island in the early 1900s. The characters were inventive, shrewd, cutthroat, and aggressive. The story was meaty and juicy, with glitzy and glamorous celebrities influencing the plot. No, this is not a pitch for an HBO prestige drama or Oscar-nominated biopic. Rather, it was the real-life scene of the (hot) dog fight that took place between Charles Feltman and Nathan Handwerker, two names that might not immediately resonate, but whose influence in the world of hot dogs is legendary.

Whether you top it with a meat chili as is done in New York’s North Country—Clinton, Essex, Franklin, Hamilton, St. Lawrence, Jefferson, and Lewis Counties—or smother it in nuclear reactive green relish, yellow mustard, chopped onions, and a dill pickle spear as you might find in Chicago, there’s something satisfying about the simple pleasure of eating a hot dog. Of course, not all franks are created equally: There are countless variations, from all-beef kosher, to cased, uncased, cured, and uncured. Take pea and soy protein and extrude it into a casing, and you have a sausage. Put that same creation on a bun, and voila, it becomes a hot dog—albeit not the one that ignited the fiery encounter between Feltman and Handwerker on Coney Island’s boardwalk.

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9 Kitchen, Pantry & Grill Essentials You Need to Make a Truly Excellent Burger

Few things taste like summer more than biting into a freshly grilled, fully loaded, burger. The bun is buttery, the toppings are piled high (unless you’re more of a minimalistic burger connoisseur and keep things simple or plain), and you know you’ll b…

Few things taste like summer more than biting into a freshly grilled, fully loaded, burger. The bun is buttery, the toppings are piled high (unless you're more of a minimalistic burger connoisseur and keep things simple or plain), and you know you'll be going back for seconds.

If you're typically the one enjoying the burgers and never behind the grill, you might wonder how the mouthwatering backyard dinner staples come to be. It's not magic or a skill that has to be passed down through generations—anyone can make a truly excellent burger with the right tools.

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How 3 Cookbook Authors Make Vegetables the Star of Every Meal

For New York Times columnist and cookbook author Hetty Lui McKinnon, vegetables are more than just a food group—they’re deeply personal. “My father worked the produce markets in Sydney, so…we were surrounded by fresh, seasonal produce,” she says. “Ther…

For New York Times columnist and cookbook author Hetty Lui McKinnon, vegetables are more than just a food group—they’re deeply personal. “My father worked the produce markets in Sydney, so…we were surrounded by fresh, seasonal produce,” she says. “There was a sense of abundance.” But after he passed away, when Hetty was 15, their family no longer had access to that same beautiful, seasonal produce. In that time, practicality, not seasonality, became the guiding principle for how they shopped and ate.

In her new cookbook, Tenderheart, which landed on shelves in May, Hetty puts her complex relationship to vegetables on display in recipes that reflect her flexible, deeply personal approach to cooking. Organized into chapters that each highlight a different vegetable, the book explores family recipes (like Mum’s Velvet Potatoes) alongside playful riffs on classics (see: Charred Broccoli Reuben Salad and Chocolate-Eggplant Brownies) and ultra-versatile weeknight meals (Soy-Butter Bok Choy Pasta and Cheesy Kale & Rice Cake Bake, to name just two).

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