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Why Are We Throwing Away the Best Parts of the Tomato?

There may be perfectly good reasons for coring or seeding or peeling a tomato—sometimes.

Maybe you want a supersmooth sauce. Maybe that unpredictable pool of juice could throw off the ratio in your nkrakra or pudding. Maybe you’re in French culinary s…

There may be perfectly good reasons for coring or seeding or peeling a tomato—sometimes.

Maybe you want a supersmooth sauce. Maybe that unpredictable pool of juice could throw off the ratio in your nkrakra or pudding. Maybe you’re in French culinary school and it’s tomato concassé day (when you’ll learn to strip away everything but small cubes of flesh—and then form your own opinions).

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The Single Most Genius Thing You Can Do to a Ripe Tomato

There are heaps of inarguably perfect ways to eat a ripe tomato—on plain-jane sandwich bread with a cushy swipe of mayo, blistered hot and fast in a skillet till the skins peel back and the oil swirls with juice, cherry babies squished behind your seal…

There are heaps of inarguably perfect ways to eat a ripe tomato—on plain-jane sandwich bread with a cushy swipe of mayo, blistered hot and fast in a skillet till the skins peel back and the oil swirls with juice, cherry babies squished behind your sealed lips.

But the one way to make a tomato taste its most tomatoey, to become a fully actualized, out-loud version of itself, is to very verrrry slowly remove that which isn’t tomato. And the part that isn’t pulling its weight as tomato is the 94% of it that’s water.

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The Latest ‘Genius’ Cookbook Looks Like Another Winner

Food52 founding editor, Kristin Miglore, has done it again. Last year, when we announced the publication of her latest cookbook—Simply Genius: Recipes for Beginners, Busy Cooks & Curious People—we knew it would be another winner. Her series of cook…

Food52 founding editor, Kristin Miglore, has done it again. Last year, when we announced the publication of her latest cookbook—Simply Genius: Recipes for Beginners, Busy Cooks & Curious People—we knew it would be another winner. Her series of cookbooks based upon her Genius recipe column has already notched one award from the International Association of Culinary Professionals (IACP), and last week, the organization showed her some love once again by making Simply Genius a finalist in the General category of the 2023 IACP Cookbook awards.

Kristen's book is in good company—Ottolenghi Test Kitchen: Extra Good Things Bold and Milk Street: Cook What You Have are also finalists—and the IACP will announce the winners in late September. Even without this accolade, the book is a hit with our community members. “If I had to choose any of my hundred or more recipe books to take on a desert island,” writes one reviewer, Elizabeth B., “I would choose Genius [Recipes] and Genius Desserts and now Simply Genius. They are the best!” Congrats to Kristen!

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The Secret to Your Next Easy Dinner is Your Kettle

Yes, simply buttered noodles or a packet of instant ramen can make for a nearly effortless dinner. And yes, my family has made it clear they generally prefer them to anything more complex that I can whip up. And sometimes, that’s exactly what we do.

B…

Yes, simply buttered noodles or a packet of instant ramen can make for a nearly effortless dinner. And yes, my family has made it clear they generally prefer them to anything more complex that I can whip up. And sometimes, that’s exactly what we do.

But, as the third party naysayer who always wants (but rarely has time for) much more, I latched onto this line in Lara Lee’s new cookbook, A Splash of Soy: Everyday Food from Asia, about Lara’s take on the iconic Jakarta noodle dish, ketoprak: “The kettle is your friend in this no-cook version.”

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The Genius Secret to Juicy Turkey Burgers (Chicken & Pork Burgers, Too)

This post contains products independently chosen (and loved) by our editors and writers. Food52 earns an affiliate commission on qualifying purchases of the products we link to.

Who among us hasn’t been burned by a dry turkey burger before? (Or chi…

This post contains products independently chosen (and loved) by our editors and writers. Food52 earns an affiliate commission on qualifying purchases of the products we link to.

Who among us hasn’t been burned by a dry turkey burger before? (Or chicken, or pork, or even beef, that time whoever was in charge of shopping went down a dark path and bought the 98% lean mix.) I had an especially dismal one just recently at the burger joint across the street from my apartment. Fool me, I don’t know, a hundred times?

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52 Essential Genius Recipes for Beginners & Busy Cooks

Fifteen-minute dinners from the pantry. Shakshuka and ragú you can make ahead to take the angst out of having friends over. Shortcut recipes filled with things you don’t have to do, like babysit beans, slow-scramble eggs, peel squash, or knead bread do…

Fifteen-minute dinners from the pantry. Shakshuka and ragú you can make ahead to take the angst out of having friends over. Shortcut recipes filled with things you don’t have to do, like babysit beans, slow-scramble eggs, peel squash, or knead bread dough.

These are the sorts of Genius recipes that welcome beginners and soothe busy cooks. Below are 52 essentials, broken down by needs from speedy workday breakfasts to no-special-equipment desserts (there are loads more like them in the Simply Genius cookbook, with extra riffs, how-to photos and illustrations, and tips for fixing the oopses). Share with graduates, newlyweds, weary new parents, and all those in your life who could benefit from such magical intel—then tuck them into your back pocket, too.

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12 Genius Salads You’ll Be Making All Spring & Summer Long

Salads have always been sleeper Genius Recipe hits year-round (the butternut you don’t have to peel? The radicchio with the secret onion? The bitter greens doused in melted cheese, nachos-style?).

But spring and summer, of course, with a rainbow of pl…

Salads have always been sleeper Genius Recipe hits year-round (the butternut you don’t have to peel? The radicchio with the secret onion? The bitter greens doused in melted cheese, nachos-style?).

But spring and summer, of course, with a rainbow of plant friends bursting forth, are when salads with a smart trick or two really get their day in the sun. Below are 12 of my favorites for prolific gardens and warm days, picnics and backyard barbecues—conversation-sparkers, each and every one.

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12 Years Later, Le Bernardin’s Crispy-Skinned Fish Is Still Genius

Twelve years ago, I wrote about a gonzo trick for crispy-skinned fish I’d witnessed in the kitchen at Le Bernardin.

One of the fanciest restaurants in New York City (and the world) decidedly wasn’t using stone-ground local grains, but Wondra flour—a 1…

Twelve years ago, I wrote about a gonzo trick for crispy-skinned fish I’d witnessed in the kitchen at Le Bernardin.

One of the fanciest restaurants in New York City (and the world) decidedly wasn’t using stone-ground local grains, but Wondra flour—a 1960s-era convenience product that wondrously dissolves more quickly than all-purpose. I had to tell the world about this technique, and our community quickly fell in love, too. But then, until recently, I forgot the joys of using it myself.

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This Genius Recipe Is Our All-Time Most Popular Egg Dish

Scrambled, poached, fried, or coddled: Every way of making eggs has a time and place. However, there’s only one egg that I could eat anytime, anywhere, with anything—and based on the recipe’s enduring popularity, I’d bet a lot of you feel the same way….

Scrambled, poached, fried, or coddled: Every way of making eggs has a time and place. However, there’s only one egg that I could eat anytime, anywhere, with anything—and based on the recipe’s enduring popularity, I’d bet a lot of you feel the same way. I’m talking about none other than Momofuku’s Soy Sauce Eggs.

From Korea’s mayak gyeran to Japan’s shoyu tamago, soy sauce-marinated eggs have long been a popular dish in many cuisines. Savory and salty, they're typically made using the same general formula: The eggs are first medium- or hard-boiled, then marinated in soy sauce along with acid, sugar, and other aromatics, if desired. From there, you can add the eggs to pretty much anything (or eat them straight from the fridge, as I tend to do).

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A Genius Trick for Quicker, Creamier Oatmeal—With No Sticky Pot to Clean

The elevator pitch for the recipe is a really good one: With one little equipment swap, you can make a quicker, creamier bowl of oatmeal, and leave no stubborn pot soaking in the sink.

This was how talented food stylist, author, and TV star Samantha S…

The elevator pitch for the recipe is a really good one: With one little equipment swap, you can make a quicker, creamier bowl of oatmeal, and leave no stubborn pot soaking in the sink.

This was how talented food stylist, author, and TV star Samantha Seneviratne hooked me at a Genius video shoot years ago. She’d picked up the trick in a test kitchen and really put it to use feeding her toddler son Artie. Ready for it? Grab a nonstick skillet for cozy oats that cook down quicker and creamier than in a deep pot (and clean up way easier).

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