Mung Bean Yoga Bowl

The kind of power bowl that keeps you strong – herb-packed yogurt dolloped over a hearty bowl of mung beans and quinoa, finished with toasted nuts and a simple paprika oil.

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I thought I’d show you how I take a favorite component of a recent recipe, make a minor tweak, and turn it into something completely different. Do you remember the herb-packed coconut milk from this green curry porridge? Well, it’s good. Good in its own right. And if you have some on hand, it’s a nice jumping off point for a meal. It has a luxe, cilantro-ginger creaminess that makes for a brilliant component in dressings, drizzles, and sandwich spreads. Add some eggs and you have an easy tart filling.
Big bowl filled with mung beans, quinoa, yogurt dressing and paprika oil
For today’s recipe I made a version with yogurt in place of the coconut milk, and it did not disappoint. Lobbing dollops over a simple bowl of mung beans and quinoa made for the sort of easy, nutritious lunch I aim for. Some toasted nuts and a drizzle of paprika oil bring a bit of flair and textural contrast. It’ll keep you strong for whatever you afternoon has in store – yoga class, a bike ride, work meetings, or whatever.
mung beans draining above a large cast iron pot and a jar of quinoa to the side

This is the sort of thing that you can pack in layers in a wide-mouthed mason jar as a portable lunch or picnic go-to. It’s good at room temperature and doesn’t require much fuss at all once you have the components prepared. And really, don’t get too hung up on the base ingredients – like I mentioned, I used mung beans and black quinoa, but if you have lentils and/or brown rice on hand, you’re set. Try to work in a substantial protein component though like some sort of bean or lentil. It’ll keep you strong and less hungry compared to, say, a rice-only version. xo Enjoy! -htofu scramble with skillet potatoes in a bowl

More lunch ideas:

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Broccoli Apple Salad

A dreamy broccoli apple salad made from all-star ingredients. Bright broccoli florets, crisp apples, crunchy fried shallots, candied nuts and slivered red onions are tossed in a honey-kissed, creamy, almond dressing.

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All things crunchy and colorful are combined in this broccoli apple salad. And it’s a beauty! Bright broccoli florets, crisp apples, crunchy shallots, candied nuts and slivered red onions are tossed in a barely sweet, creamy almond dressing.

broccoli apple salad drizzled with dressing on a blue plate

This is a hearty and substantial salad with lots of play between the sweet of the apple, the savory shallots, and the crunch of the candied walnuts and crisp, flash-boiled broccoli. It’s the sort of thing that is welcome on just about any table – holiday, picnic, Tuesday night, or desk at work. I if you’re on the look out for feel-good lunch ideas, I also love this broccoli salad as a bento component.

ingredients for broccoli salad including walnuts, chives, apples and red onions arranged on a counter

Make Ahead Plan

With a bit of planning, this recipe comes together quickly. You can make most of components ahead of time, but, pro-tip, don’t dress the salad until you are ready to serve it. This preserves the various crunches. Make the almond butter dressing up to a few days in advance. Same goes for the crispy shallots. If you are going to do the version with candied walnuts, those will hold in an air-tight container for weeks. Beyond that you’re simply boiling broccoli and slicing apples.

all the ingredients for broccoli apple salad in a metal bowl readdy to be tossed

Broccoli Salad Variations

  • Make it a Main Dish: Add caramelized tofu, pan-glazed tempeh, or spicy tempeh crumble (on top) to turn this into a main course.

  • Ginger Carrot Broccoli Salad: Swap out the creamy almond butter dressing in the recipe below, and use this ginger carrot dressing instead.

  • Broccoli Apple Salad with Spicy Ranch Dressing: Swap out the creamy almond butter in the recipe below and use this spicy ranch dressing in this wedge salad recipe instead.

  • Broccoli Apple Salad with Peanut Butter Dressing: In this version, swap out the almond butter and swap in peanut butter.

broccoli apple salad drizzled with dressing on a blue plate with a large serving spoon

More Broccoli Recipes

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10 Fantastic Pumpkin Recipes Worth Making this Fall

The best pumpkin recipes currently on my radar for this fall. A curated list of recipes to have in rotation for peak pumpkin (and winter squash) season. Emphasis on dinner, emphasis on savory.

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Because pumpkin recipes can often be so wrong, you need a list of when they are so right. This is a curated list of recipes to have in rotation for peak pumpkin (and winter squash) season. Emphasis on dinner, emphasis on savory.

1. Pumpkin and Rice Soup(101 Cookbooks)
Six ingredients stand between you and this favorite ginger-chile kissed pumpkin soup. Served over rice it makes the perfect simple, soul-warming meal. Get the recipe here.

Fantastic Pumpkin Recipes worth Making this Fall

2. Pumpkin & Feta Muffins(101 Cookbooks)
These are a super interesting, hearty beast of a savory muffin. Packed with seeds, spinach, herbs, and seasoned with mustard, you can use any winter squash. Get the recipe here.

Fantastic Pumpkin Recipes worth Making this Fall

3. Pumpkin Miso Broth with Soba(My New Roots)
Soba noodles in a pureed pumpkin soup flavored with miso and ginger. Top with lots of scallions, sesame seeds, seaweed (I like toasted nori, crumbled), and sautéed (or roasted) shiitake mushrooms. Or you can simply make the base soup and top with whatever you have on hand. Get the recipe here.

Fantastic Pumpkin Recipes worth Making this Fall
4. Toasted Pumpkin Seeds – (101 Cookbooks)
While you’re at it, if you’re cooking with pumpkin, you might as well toast the seeds. It’s simple and you can season them a bunch of different ways – I’ve included three faves here. Get the recipe.
Fantastic Pumpkin Recipes worth Making this Fall

5. David Kramer and Hayley Magnus’ Squash and Kale Salad(Salad for President)
Use whatever pumpkin or hard winter squash you’ve got, cut into thick slabs. Kale represents big here accented with hazelnuts, pickled onions, and cilantro. Get the recipe here.

Fantastic Pumpkin Recipes worth Making this Fall
6. Sourdough Galette with Delicata Squash(101 Cookbooks)
Six ingredients stand between you and this favorite ginger-chile kissed pumpkin soup. Served over rice it makes the perfect simple, soul-warming meal. Get the recipe here.
Fantastic Pumpkin Recipes worth Making this Fall

7. Incredible Squash Pizza(Wholehearted Eats)
If you’re open to alternative interpretations of pizza, this is a beauty. The “crust” is a riff on the popular cauliflower crust, this one made with pumpkin (or winter squash) slathered with a basil-spinach nut sauce, and topped with vibrant cherry tomatoes or other seasonal veg. Get the recipe here.

Fantastic Pumpkin Recipes worth Making this Fall

8. Miso Sesame Winter Squash – (101 Cookbooks)
Inspired by a recipe in Bryant Terry’s cookbook, The Inspired Vegan. Roasted winter squash (and tofu) is combined here with a wonderful miso, maple, sesame and citrus sauce. Get the recipe here.

Fantastic Pumpkin Recipes worth Making this Fall

9. Roasted Delicata Squash – (101 Cookbooks)
If breaking down a big pumpkin or squash fills you with dread, this is your recipe. A longtime favorite, it calls for thin-skinned delicata squash, and you leave the skins on. Tossed with a miso harissa paste, roasted and combined with potatoes, kales, and almonds. Give this one a go for sure. Get the recipe here.

Fantastic Pumpkin Recipes worth Making this Fall
10. Pumpkin, Spinach and Walnut Spaghetti(Lazy Cat Kitchen)
If I can’t be bothered to carve and cube an actual pumpkin or squash for a recipe like this one, I grab for a bag of frozen sweet potatoes. They’re pre-cubed, and I always keep a couple bags in the freezer for lazy weeknights. Alternately, you might carve a number of pumpkins or squash on your own, and freeze any you wont be using. Being nice to your future self! 😉Get the recipe here.
Fantastic Pumpkin Recipes worth Making this Fall

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Big Sur Bakery Hide Bread

From the Big Sur Bakery cookbook, a seed-packed pocket bread recipe contributed by a good friend of the bakery. Sesame, sunflower, flax and poppy seeds, quinoa and oat bran impressively cram themselves into these delicious, hearty rolls.

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The Big Sur Bakery sits back off California’s famous Highway 1 a bit, nestled next to a gas station. The owners, three of them, left the Los Angeles restaurant scene years ago, determined to turn a property with a lackluster track record into something special. They set their sights on a house-turned-abandoned-restaurant, eventually wrangling it into what is now the beloved Big Sur Bakery.

Small round homemade breads topped with seeds and butter on a baking sheet
It was tough choosing a single recipe to feature from their namesake cookbook, but a seed-packed pocket bread contributed by a good friend of the bakery jumped out at me. Sesame, sunflower, flax and poppy seeds, millet, oat bran, and a splash of beer impressively cram themselves into palm-sized hearty rolls in a way that doesn’t disappoint.
Small round homemade breads topped with seeds on a marble counter

Big Sur Bakery Hide Bread

The recipe is from Terry “Hide” Prince, one of the bakery’s earliest friends. If you can imagine dense, seed and grain-packed soda bread, you’re in the ballpark. Rather than using salt, Terry gathers kelp from the coast and uses it to season the bread. I use sea salt (and salad booster), or dulse flakes if I have them. Use what you have. The key to enjoying these delicious little breads (and I can’t emphasize this enough), is splitting them open, toasting until they are deeply golden, then slathering generously with butter (or drizzling with olive oil). Then sprinkle with a bit more salt. Blissful buttery crunchiness.

Variations

These are divisive little pucks. People either have deep love for them, or….don’t. You can browse the comments for insight into both camps. They also take well to endless variations. As you can see from terry’s comment below, that’s the spirit of it!

  • More from Terry: He says, “There’s no need to be intimidated by making my bread. It was born out of a sea voyage, from Hawaii to New Zealand, because it was easier than yeast bread. I used my friend, Jay’s, Irish soda bread recipe, only I added my own super foods. Amaranth, millet, and quinoa all have the 8 essential amino acids for building muscle, flax seeds for digestion, and kelp or seaweed for vitamins and minerals. I keep a 5 gallon pickle bucket with my dry bread mix, adding whatever sounds healthy.”
  • A gluten-free version: Obsoletepostergirl says, “this recipe adapted very well to gluten free. I used my usual mix of brown rice flour, millet flour, oat flour, and tapioca starch in place of the flour. I used coconut milk in place of buttermilk as well. They turned out wonderfully when toasted!”

Bread in a roll shape topped with seeds held in the palm of a hand

The Big Sur Bakery Cookbook

The cookbook captures a year in the life of the restaurant through a series of vignettes, purveyor profiles, and recipes. Anyone who dreams of starting their own restaurant should have a read. One of the things I like about this book is the way it illustrates many of the things that make creating a restaurant so fulfilling. At the same time it isn’t afraid to touch on some of the stuff that also makes it so difficult. As I’m sure many of you know (or can imagine) Big Sur is remote, and running any sort of business in a town connected by a single power line to Carmel isn’t without its challenges.

How To Make Big Sur Hide Bread

Here’s a quick guide to the major steps needed to make this bread. 

Large mixing bowl with bread ingredients including flax seeds, sunflower seeds, quinoa, flour, and bran

Step 1: This bread comes together like a soda bread. No yeast is called for, it’s a quick bread that comes together in no time with baking soda as the leavener. Start by combining the dry ingredients in a large mixing bowl. Add buttermilk to this dry mixture and stir until everything comes together.

bread dough rolled out on counter and cut into portions
Step 2: Turn the dough out onto a countertop, roll into a wide log. Slice into equal pieces and for into patties. The shape I aim for is like a small English muffin.

Individual rolls shaped and arranged on metal baking sheet prior to baking
Step 3: Brush the tops of each roll with buttermilk and sprinkle with seeds and seaweed.
Individual bread rolls on baking sheet sprinkled with seeds prior to baking
Step 4: Bake for about 45 minutes or until the bottoms are golden.
Small round homemade breads topped with seeds on a marble counter

A Few Things That Make the Big Sur Bakery Special

I’ve been to the bakery a number of times over the years. I love the dark wood, the beautifully rustic morning pastries, and the mix of locals and people just-traveling-through intersecting at the counter. The bakery serves coffee and pastries in the morning and early afternoon, lunch on certain days, as well as dinner (hours listed here). The heart of the bakery is the wood-fired stove – and much of the food served (and featured in the cookbook) is inspired by it.

A Bit More About the Cookbook

The Big Sur Bakery Cookbook includes a wide range of recipes, not simply pastries and baked treats. Also plenty for vegetarians and non-vegetarians alike. I’ve earmarked the Dresden Stollen (legendary), Nine-Grain Pancakes, Date & Quinoa Muffins, and the Fresh Garbanzo Bean Stew. Sara Remington did the photography for the book – a beautiful combination of portraits, images of Big Sur, meals shared, and of course, no end to the photos of the food. In all, 262 pages, full color. If you haven’t been able to visit in person yet, the book is next best.

Small round homemade breads topped with seeds on a marble counter

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Green Curry Porridge

A green curry porridge to keep you cozy as the weather changes season. This is a great way to use up winter squash and any herbs you have on hand. Rice and coconut milk form the base, and you get a kiss of spicy from serrano chile.

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This is a boisterous green curry porridge made with pan-toasted brown rice, spicy herb-packed green coconut broth, all punctuated with winter squash and lots of green onions. It’s the kind of bowl that keeps you warm, full, and happy from the inside out.

a bowl of rice-based green curry porridge made with delicata squash and herbs

Green Curry Porridge: Variations

A good number of you have made this over the years. Here are a few stand-out riffs on the recipe from the comments. Over here, sometimes we like to serve it with a poached egg on top. Other times we work in some chickpeas and a bit of pan-fried tofu to top things off.

  • Mix it up! Drops of Jupiter swapped out the rice…”My boyfriend made this last night substituting rice with a high fibre grain mix (wheat, buckwheat, rice, chinese barley, wild rice) and it was stupendous! we didn’t even saute the rice. We used organic veg broth and in place of sorrel, baby spinach and arugula that was lying in the fridge. Eating this for lunch now too as it makes for great leftovers.”
  • Other squash: Claire notes, “ I used acorn squash, stirred in some tofu, and garnished with chopped peanuts”

a hand drizzling olive oil over a bowl of green curry porridge
The key with this recipe is to get the seasoning right. If you under salt, it’ll be bland. So, pay close attention. You also want it to have nice acidity from a generous squeeze of lime, a kick of spiciness from the chile pepper, and a jolt of green from the sorrel or spinach, cilantro, and green onions. The creamy coconut milk brings it all together. You can dial any of the variables to your liking and, of course, experiment with other toppings.

More delicata squash recipes

More Rice Recipes

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Peanut Butter Granola

Using a short ingredient list of pantry basics, this peanut butter granola is incredibly good. It features a peanut butter and maple syrup coating that bakes beautifully into crunchy oat clusters.

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This peanut butter granola is my granola of choice as the seasons change. If mornings are cold enough to need a sweater, the homemade granola I’m baking is getting an extra layer as well. In this case that extra layer is a warm mixture of peanut butter and maple syrup accented with lemon zest. Combine this with a bowl of old-fashioned oats, and the granola it forms while baking develops a peanut-centric, powdery soft coating. Cashmere and crunchy clusters. So good.
peanut butter granola topping yogurt in a ceramic bowl

If you’ve never baked homemade granola before, this would be the recipe to try. The ingredient list is short, and consists of items you might already have in your pantry – oats, peanut butter, maple syrup, lemon, vanilla extract. It’s not a lot of effort, you can bake a double batch, and you’ll likely be way ahead on cost compared to store-bought granolas which can be super pricey.peanut butter granola in a large mason jar

How To Make Peanut Butter Granola

Making peanut butter granola couldn’t be simpler! You gently heat a mixture of peanut butter and maple syrup along with a couple other ingredients into a beautiful molten mixture that will have you licking the pan. Pour this mixture over your oats and peanuts and bake into golden-edged clusters.a mixing bowl filled with granola ingredients and a large spoon

A Couple Tips

There are a couple things I pay close attention to when making this granola. I’m calling them out here, before you get down into the recipe, for emphasis.

  • Mixing matters: First, you want to mix the oats and peanut butter coating *really* well. Stir, stir, and then stir some more. This way you get a uniform granola that will bake more evenly.
  • No blond granola: For this granola (and most granolas, really) to be truly great you need it toasted. I’d rather over-bake this granola versus underbake. Go for golden edges, and stir the granola at least once to give some of the center a chance to toast out near the edges.

granola spread across a baking sheet prior to baking
Well mixed granola before baking (above). And nicely toasted granola after baking (below).
clumps of peanut butter granola on a rimmed baking sheet

Variations & Ideas

I’ve included the recipe down below, it’s a great base recipe for peanut butter granola, but keep in mind you can use it to explore all sorts of other ideas and variations! For example:

  • Experiment with other nut butters: Of the nut butters, I prefer the strong flavor of peanut butter, but almond butter is another option especially if you or someone close to you has a peanut allergy. I want to do a pistachio butter version, but would have to name it Millionaires’ granola. The last small jar I bought was $25 – worth every penny, but so far it has been reserved for enjoying by the spoonful straight from the jar.
  • Add boosters:  You can add nutritional boosters here and/or spices. Adding a couple tablespoons of chia or hemp seeds to the oat mixture is one option. Adding a tablespoon of curry powder to granola is another favorite flavor boost.
  • Gluten Free Peanut Butter Granola: use gluten-free oats and follow the recipe as written.
  • Use granola in baking: Mix a couple cups of clumps of peanut butter granola into your next batch of chocolate chip cookies, or shortbread.

peanut butter granola topping yogurt in a ceramic bowl

Peanut butter granola served over Greek yogurt with a drizzle of maple syrup and some crushed freeze-dried raspberries.

More Breakfast Recipes

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Roasted Cherry Tomatoes

Keep these on hand to dial up all your favorite meals. They are intensely flavorful roasted cherry tomatoes. Made by roasting in a hot oven with olive oil, salt, and a bit of brown sugar. So simple to make and so good!

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For a good part of the year, roasted cherry tomatoes factor into just about every meal. The cycle goes something like this: buy a lot of cherry tomatoes – red, orange, purple, yellow – they’re all a good. Rinse, roast, then put them on (and in!) everything. The tiny tomatoes collapse and caramelize  in a hot oven. The water bakes out of them, and you’re left with intensely concentrated flavor that adds a bolt of flavor to whatever you’re cooking.

deeply roasted cherry tomatoes on a sheet pan

I’ve included a version of this recipe in just about every cookbook I’ve written. It’s also embedded in many of the recipes on this site. I felt like it was time this superhero got a dedicated page.

Roasted cherry tomatoes like these are a simple way to boost an everyday meal, sandwich, or pasta bowl to the next level. They bring the flavor big time.

different color cherry tomatoes piled in a container

Tasty Ways to Use Roasted Tomatoes:

  • As a topping on avocado toast. Finish with a little squeeze of lemon and some chopped chives.
  • On polenta with lots of grated Parmesan cheese and a bit of chile oil.
  • They’re a great pizza topping and always welcome on flatbreads.
  • For an amazing compound butter, after allowing to cool completely, fold some of the tomatoes into a stick of softened butter. Add some snipped chives, and fresh thyme and use on everything from baked potatoes to homemade pasta.
  • As a brunch topping bar hero, we love them on waffles, frittatas, and tucked into a good omelette.
    yellow cherry tomatoes on a baking sheet

More Recipes with Roasted Cherry Tomatoes

This is a list of the recipes I’ve featured over the years that include roasted cherry tomatoes.

TLT sandwich pictured from the side with lettuce and roasted cherry tomatoes

TLT Sandwich: This is a vegetarian TLT sandwich inspired by the classic BLT sandwich. This version includes chipotle-marinated tempeh alongside oven roasted tomatoes, a bit of shredded lettuce, and a generous avocado slather on a thin slice (or two) of great bread.bowl of tom yum soup topped with tomatoes, mushrooms and lime wedge

California Tom Yum Soup: Roasted cherry tomatoes are a favorite topping on this twist on tom yum.

tortilla soup in a bowl topped with tortilla strips, sliced avocado, and sour cream
Vegetarian Tortilla Soup: This soup is all about the broth. And then all about the toppings. Roasted cherry tomatoes are a favorite way to finish tortilla soup along with thinly sliced avocado, and lots of tortilla chip matchsticks.

plate of quinoa mixed with roasted tomatoes, tofu, seeds, and kale
Heather Quinoa: The tomatoes are a major component in this favorite quinoa recipe. Tossed together with quinoa, pepitas, corn, kale, and tofu.bowl of panzanella made with bread, tomatoes, and sprouts

California Panzanella: I call this a wildcard panzanella. And it is a bit of a weirdo, but in a good way! Very Northern California and hippie in spirit. It features the roasted tomatoes, multi-grain bread, sprouts, grilled tofu, and a spicy peanut sauce.

 

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Better Breakfast Cereal

This is going to make your mornings better. Combine entire boxes of healthful cereal into your biggest bowl, add extra oats, oat bran, ground flax seeds, and freeze-dried berries. Now you have plenty of breakfasts ready to go.

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I’m going to share with you a bigger, better, crunchier breakfast cereal. Also more nutritious. Some of you aren’t going to be interested in this concept at all, and that’s cool. For some of you, this is going to be a game changer. Because all of the the components are dry, your are rewarded with weeks of quick breakfasts, and you can easily scoop some into baggies for simple travel breakfasts.

A large jar filled with homemade breakfast cereal

I had been making my own dry cereal breakfast blends for months before things started to get more interesting. I started making it in increasingly larger, and larger batches. We eventually got to the point where I like to cherry-pick boxes of favorite cereals, dump entire boxes into the most massive bowl I can find, and add quick oats, oat bran, ground flax, and freeze dried fruit. After that, give everything a good toss, and transfer to two XXXL glass Weck jars. The big-batch thing is the magic. Especially if you’re at all lazy, but still want a great breakfast.
Closeup photo of better breakfast cereal

A Custom Blend: Choosing Your Cereals

I’m including the recipe down below for what I think of as my “base” cereal recipe. That said, I encourage you to use it as a jumping off point. Try not to get hung up on whether you can track down the exact cereals I use. My cereals of choice are oat flakes, shredded wheat, plus some sort of dense nugget cereal. Broadly speaking, a mix of sugar-free / whole grain / high-fiber cereals is what you’re going for. Said another way, a mix of textures, and nutrient diversity.

two bowls filled with breakfast cereal

Better Breakfast Cereal: Variations

This is the berry version (photos above and below). But there are times I do a tropical version, swapping out the berries for freeze-dried bananas, pineapple, and apples. Big flakes of toasted coconut is also a good add. You can also introduce fresh fruit when you add the milk, along with anything else you have on hand that might be a bonus.

A Big, Crunchy, Better Breakfast Cereal

More Make-Ahead Breakfast Recipes

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Heather’s Quinoa

A one-skillet quinoa recipe – quinoa, corn, chopped kale and pan-toasted tofu tossed with a big dollop of pesto and finished off with a few roasted cherry tomatoes.

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This quinoa recipe is an odd bird of sorts, but it was so well received that I thought I’d share it with you. Heather, my sister was on her way over for lunch. Wanting to avoid a trip to the store, I committed myself to throwing lunch together using whatever I had on hand. 
Big plate of quinoa with tomatoes, pesto, and pepitas
Now, I rarely combine tofu with Italian-style sauces, but this (and a few other questionable culinary moves) came into play as I reached for ingredients from both fridge and freezer. Working toward a nutritious, somewhat balanced, in-the-realm-of-healthy main course here’s where I ended up. In a sentence – a skillet of quinoa, corn, chopped lacinato kale and pan-toasted tofu tossed with a big dollop of pesto and finished off with a few roasted cherry tomatoes.

Roasted cherry tomatoes on a baking sheet
I’ve cooked this many times in the years since, and it’s a great late-summer recipe that comes together quickly, especially if you keep a few of the components on hand. For example, I like to keep big jars of roasted tomatoes at the ready. Toasted pepitas are often in a bowl on the counter. And at some point during any given week there is leftover quinoa.
pepitas toasted on a baking sheet

Heather’s Quinoa: Variations

There are infinite ways to switch this up. If I have paneer cheese on hand, I like to swap that in for the tofu. You brown the paneer in a skillet, the same way you would tofu, and it gets nice and sizzly. So good.

And while you can certainly swap in a wide range of grains here – rice, millet, etc. – I love it with quinoa. You see it pictured here with tri-color quinoa, but I often make it with the white variety. Th recipe calls for three cups of cooked quinoa, if you’re not sure how to make it, here’s a page with my preferred method of how to cook quinoa.

Pepitas are my go to for crunch. Seconds choice is toasted cashews (chopped  just a bit).

Big plate of quinoa with tomatoes, pesto, and pepitas
If you want to make this even more substantial, you can add in a couple hard boiled eggs, sliced into quarters, around the perimeter. 
Big plate of quinoa with tomatoes, pesto, and pepitas

I hope you enjoy this one as much as we did. The first time I made this was in 2008, and we still make it regularly. Especially when it is peak pesto season and cherry tomatoes are abundant. 

More Quinoa Recipes

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Turmeric Chickpeas with Garlic Tahini

A quick lunch. And a compelling reason to always keep turmeric chickpeas on hand!

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This was a quick, clean out the refrigerator lunch, and a compelling reason to always keep some of these turmeric chickpeas on hand. Turmeric Chickpeas with Garlic Tahini – simple, filling, and all-around good.

Turmeric Chickpeas with Garlic Tahini in a Bowl

With the tahini under-dressing and the broccoli situation, we’re not that far from this Curried Sheet Pan Broccoli. But here there’s no oven involved, and there’s the special chickpeas, and then whatever other green things you might have at the ready in your refrigerator. The whole thing is pretty loose, I mean you can toss pretty much anything on top of the tahini sauce, and it’s a yes.

More Chickpea Recipes

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