big apple crumb cake

This is the bouldered and dramatic intersection of two of my favorite things: cinnamon baked apples and a thick crumb cake. I don’t know how they make crumb cake where you are, but here in New York, and where I grew up in New Jersey, cru…

This is the bouldered and dramatic intersection of two of my favorite things: cinnamon baked apples and a thick crumb cake. I don’t know how they make crumb cake where you are, but here in New York, and where I grew up in New Jersey, crumb cake isn’t a genteel cinnamon-ribboned or finely streusel-ed coffee cake, but a hefty square that’s 50% crumb topping and 50% a golden, sour cream-enriched cake and I wouldn’t want it any other way. Thanks to brown sugar and cinnamon, the crumb topping is always a dark stripe, and a snow-cap of powdered sugar isn’t optional. Fruit is, but this is too good with fresh apples to skip them.

new york applessplit, then coredwedgedtossed with cinnamon, sugar, lemon

For such a loud and attention-demanding cake (I’m still talking about cake, I think?), no delicate slice or dice of apples will do so I use here a full pound of thick wedges snugged so tightly they barely fit in their confines, an all-too-accurate New York real estate story. Squeezing your crumbs in small handfuls before breaking them over the apples created more boulder-like pieces. Baking this cake for almost an hour at a slightly lower temperature gives the apples enough time to get tender, their juices bubbling. Your kitchen will smell, at minimum, like a blissful epiphany of apples, brown sugar, and cinnamon, and at peak melodrama, the absolutely best decision we’ve made yet in October.

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Autumn Fruit and Nut Oatmeal

Oatmeal has been one of my favorite budget ingredients since day one. It’s super inexpensive, shelf-stable, and can be used in both sweet and savory dishes. Not to mention, a warm bowl of oatmeal is just the epitome of cozy. 🥰 This Autumn Fruit and Nut Oatmeal is one of the first flavored oatmeal I […]

The post Autumn Fruit and Nut Oatmeal appeared first on Budget Bytes.

Oatmeal has been one of my favorite budget ingredients since day one. It’s super inexpensive, shelf-stable, and can be used in both sweet and savory dishes. Not to mention, a warm bowl of oatmeal is just the epitome of cozy. 🥰 This Autumn Fruit and Nut Oatmeal is one of the first flavored oatmeal I made back in the day when I was flat broke but knew I still needed to put something good in my belly. You can make one serving at a time, or make a batch of two as listed below and just microwave the second half for your breakfast the next morning (or share with someone you love). Enjoy!

Originally posted 10-29-2010, updated 10-7-2021.

Overhead view of two bowls of autumn fruit and nut oatmeal

What Kind of Oats are Best?

My favorite kind of oats to use for a classic bowl of oatmeal are old-fashioned rolled oats. These oats have plenty of texture so you don’t end up with a bowl of mush, and they still cook relatively quickly (about 5 minutes). You can use quick oats if you have to, but you’ll want to adjust the cooking time according to what is suggested on the package and keep in mind that the texture won’t be as great. You could definitely do something similar with steel-cut oats, although they require a much longer cooking time and more liquid, so adjust as needed. 

Sweeten to Your Liking

I used a couple of tablespoons of maple syrup to sweeten my Autumn Fruit and Nut Oatmeal because that maple flavor adds to the whole autumn vibe. But real maple syrup can be expensive, so if you want to cut the costs on this bowl a bit, try using brown sugar instead. Brown sugar still goes great with all the flavors in this bowl and is much less expensive. Feel free to swap out with any sweetener of your choice, keeping in mind the flavor differences from maple syrup. 

How to Store Leftovers of Autumn Fruit and Nut Oatmeal

The batch below makes two servings, so if you want to save the second serving for the next day, I would refrigerate it before adding the second half of the apples and the walnuts. Add those after reheating the next day. To reheat, simply microwave for 1-2 minutes, adding a splash of water to help loosen the oatmeal as you stir. Once reheated, top with the apples and walnuts, then enjoy.

Can I Use a Microwave?

Yes, you can definitely make this in a microwave. I suggest making one serving at a time (half of the recipe below). Simply add the butter, apples, cinnamon, cloves, oats, salt, water, and cranberries to a bowl. Microwave on high for one minute, stir, then microwave again in 30-second intervals until thickened. Sweeten with maple syrup, then top with the walnuts and remaining apples.

side view of a bowl of autumn fruit and nut oatmeal

Two bowls of autumn fruit and nut oatmeal surrounded by apples, leaves, and pinecones

Autumn Fruit and Nut Oatmeal

Get all of the delicious flavors of fall in one bowl with this Autumn Fruit and Nut Oatmeal. Sweet, crunchy, warm, and cozy!
Total Cost $1.83 recipe / $0.92 serving
Prep Time 5 minutes
Cook Time 10 minutes
Total Time 15 minutes
Servings 2 1.5 cups each
Calories 417kcal
Author Beth - Budget Bytes

Ingredients

  • 1 apple $0.41
  • 1 tsp butter $0.04
  • 1/2 tsp cinnamon $0.05
  • 1 pinch cloves (optional) $0.01
  • 2 cups water $0.00
  • 1 cup old-fashioned rolled oats $0.18
  • 1/8 tsp salt $0.01
  • 2 Tbsp dried cranberries $0.22
  • 1/4 cup chopped walnuts $0.30
  • 2 Tbsp maple syrup $0.60

Instructions

  • Chop the apple into ½-inch pieces. Add about ¾ of the apple pieces to a small saucepot with the butter, cinnamon, and cloves. Sauté over medium heat for a few minutes, or just until the apples begin to soften.
  • Add the water to the pot. Place a lid on top, turn the heat up to medium-high, and allow the water to come up to a boil.
  • Once the water reaches a boil, stir in the oats, dried cranberries, and salt. Turn the heat down to medium-low and continue to simmer the oats for about 5 minutes, or until thickened.
  • When the oats have thickened, stir in the chopped walnuts and maple syrup. Taste and adjust the sweetness to your liking. Top with the remaining chopped apples. Serve hot.

Nutrition

Serving: 1.5cup | Calories: 417kcal | Carbohydrates: 69g | Protein: 8g | Fat: 15g | Sodium: 182mg | Fiber: 9g

 

A spoonful of autumn fruit and nut oatmeal held above the bowl

How to Make Autumn Fruit and Nut Oatmeal – Step by Step Photos

Chopped apple on a cutting board

Chop one apple into ½-inch sized pieces. 

apple in the pot with butter

Add about ¾ of the apple pieces to a sauce pot with 1 tsp butter, ½ tsp cinnamon, and a tiny pinch of cloves (optional). Sauté over medium just until they begin to soften (just a few minutes). 

water being poured into the saucepot

Next, add 2 cups of water to the pot. Place a lid on top, turn the heat up to medium-high, and bring the water to a boil.

oats being poured into the pot

Once the water is boiling, add 1 cup old-fashioned rolled oats, 2 Tbsp dried cranberries, and 1/4 tsp salt. Turn the heat down to medium-low and continue to simmer the oats for about five minutes, or until thickened.

maple syrup being drizzled over the thickened oats in the pot

Once the oats have thickened, add ¼ cup chopped walnuts and 2 Tbsp maple syrup (or sweeten to your liking with your favorite sweetener).

Two bowls of autumn fruit and nut oatmeal surrounded by apples, leaves, and pinecones

Divide into two bowls and top with the remaining chopped apples. Enjoy!

Side view of two bowls of autumn fruit and nut oatmeal

The post Autumn Fruit and Nut Oatmeal appeared first on Budget Bytes.

Apple & Pecan Coffee Cake with Cinnamon Streusel

Apple & Pecan Coffee Cake with Cinnamon Streusel
Apple baking season doesn’t usually come into its prime until the beginning of fall, but I just couldn’t wait to get started this year. This Apple Pecan Coffee Cake with Cinnamon Streusel is a delicious coffee cake that will be a huge hit at any brunch, whether you’re serving it …

The post Apple & Pecan Coffee Cake with Cinnamon Streusel appeared first on Baking Bites.

Apple & Pecan Coffee Cake with Cinnamon Streusel
Apple baking season doesn’t usually come into its prime until the beginning of fall, but I just couldn’t wait to get started this year. This Apple Pecan Coffee Cake with Cinnamon Streusel is a delicious coffee cake that will be a huge hit at any brunch, whether you’re serving it up in the spring or autumn. The tender cake is packed with plenty of juicy apple chunks and crisp toasted pecans – and the whole thing is finished with a buttery cinnamon streusel!

The cake batter is fairly thick, which allows it to hold onto the apples and nuts so that you get a good distribution in every slice of the cake. It is made with greek yogurt (sour cream could be substituted, if you don’t have the yogurt) that tenderizes the batter and gives it a very subtle tang. I added vanilla to the batter, which highlights the apples well without weighing the cake down with an overload of spice. There is plenty of cinnamon in the topping, after all!

I used fuji apples, which I often bake with, for this recipe. While they work well in some pies, I don’t recommend using very tart apples, such as granny smiths, in this recipe because the cake itself is not overly sweet and the tart apples are a bit too sharp. Cut the apples into dice that are no larger than 1/2-inch to ensure that they cook all the way through while the cake is baking. The apples do not have to be peeled because they are cut into such small chunks, which makes prepping the fruit quick and easy. I used 1 1/2 large apples, but you might need slightly more or less depending on the size of your fruit.

The cake is delicious when it is still a tiny bit warm from the oven, with a soft crumb that is packed with flavor. The streusel has a good cinnamon flavor and is crunchy enough to be a nice contrast for the tender cake. You may not be able to finish the cake in one sitting, but fortunately it keeps quite well when stored an in airtight container so you can go back for seconds later.

Apple & Pecan Coffee Cake with Cinnamon Streusel
Cake

1 3/4 cups all purpose flour
1/2 tsp baking soda
1/2 tsp salt
1/2 cup butter, room temperature
1/2 cup sugar
1/2 cup light brown sugar
2 large eggs
1 tsp vanilla extract
2/3 cup greek-style yogurt
1 1/2 cups diced apple (approx 1 1/2 medium apples)
3/4 cup coarsely chopped, toasted pecans

Streusel
1 cup all purpose flour
3/4 cup light brown sugar
3/4 tsp ground cinnamon
1/2 tsp salt
1/4 cup butter, melted and cooled

Preheat oven to 350F. Lightly grease a 9×13-inch baking dish.
For the cake: In a medium bowl, whisk together flour, baking soda and salt.
In a large bowl, cream together butter and sugars until light. Beat in eggs, followed by vanilla extract. Stir in half of the flour mixture, followed by the yogurt. Stir in the remaining flour mixture, followed by the apples and pecans. Mix until no streaks of flour remain visible.
Pour batter into prepared pan and spread into an even layer.
For the streusel: In a medium bowl, whisk together the flour, brown sugar, cinnamon and salt. Stir in melted butter with a fork until a crumbly mixture comes together.
Squeeze clumps of the streusel mixture in your fist to create large clumps when sprinkling streusel over the cake batter in the pan.
Bake for 45-50 minutes or until a toothpick comes out clean when inserted into the cake (watch out for apple pieces!).
Allow cake to cool completely before slicing.

Serves 16.

The post Apple & Pecan Coffee Cake with Cinnamon Streusel appeared first on Baking Bites.

Caramel Apple Board

This post is sponsored by Kroger. Caramel apples are a fall staple. I love making classic caramel apples, but to be honest, they are kind of hard to eat. Instead, I like to make a Caramel Apple Board, so you can dip apple slices into caramel and lots o…

This post is sponsored by Kroger. Caramel apples are a fall staple. I love making classic caramel apples, but to be honest, they are kind of hard to eat. Instead, I like to make a Caramel Apple Board, so you can dip apple slices into caramel and lots of delicious toppings! The caramel slices are…

The post Caramel Apple Board appeared first on Two Peas & Their Pod.

Where to Go Apple Picking in New York, According to Our Hudson Valley Correspondent

Every month, Melina Hammer, Food52’s very own Hudson Valley correspondent, is serving up all the bounty that upstate New York has to offer.

Did you know? New York State’s official state fruit—and, who knew, state muffin—is the apple. Appropriately, …

Every month, Melina Hammer, Food52's very own Hudson Valley correspondent, is serving up all the bounty that upstate New York has to offer.


Did you know? New York State’s official state fruit—and, who knew, state muffin—is the apple. Appropriately, apple picking heralds in the fall in the Hudson Valley. From August through October, the crisp, sweet air is just right for orchard day trips.

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How to Store Apple Pie for a Fresh Slice

No matter how many guides there are for making the right amount of food for Thanksgiving (we even have our own chart for preparing enough food based on your guest count), there are always leftovers. Not that anyone complains. As you’re wrapping up left…

No matter how many guides there are for making the right amount of food for Thanksgiving (we even have our own chart for preparing enough food based on your guest count), there are always leftovers. Not that anyone complains. As you’re wrapping up leftovers on Thanksgiving night, you may be wondering how to store apple pie so that the crust stays crisp and the filling stays flavorful. On Friday morning, enjoy a slice of pie to accompany your breakfast sandwich made with cranberry sauce, turkey slices, and stuffing piled between a sliced buttermilk biscuit. Ahead, find even more delicious tips for ensuring that your apple pie tastes fresh days after Thanksgiving.

How to Store Apple Pie

Of course you may be asking, do I have to store the pie? What if I just ate the rest of it right here, right now? I hear you. I see you. And I’m with you. But if you’re a responsible adult that can practice restraint around baked goods like apple pie, you may want to learn how store it properly so that it stays good for Black Friday and beyond. So what’s the best way to store apple pie? “Once the pie is baked and fully cooled, store it at room temperature on a cool counter (i.e. out of direct heat), under a pie dome, in a pie box, or wrapped in plastic wrap,” says Lana, the office manager of Sister Pie in Detroit, Michigan.

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Apple Bundt Cake with Cream Cheese Frosting

I love baking with apples: apple crumble, apple cobbler, and apple muffins are a few of my “must makes” during the fall months, and now I have a new favorite. This Apple Bundt Cake with Cream Cheese Frosting is absolute perfection! I love m…

I love baking with apples: apple crumble, apple cobbler, and apple muffins are a few of my “must makes” during the fall months, and now I have a new favorite. This Apple Bundt Cake with Cream Cheese Frosting is absolute perfection! I love making bundt cakes because they are easy, feed a crowd, and you…

The post Apple Bundt Cake with Cream Cheese Frosting appeared first on Two Peas & Their Pod.

Apple Cobbler

I love all four seasons, but fall is my favorite. I love the crisp, cool air, colorful leaves, football games, cozy sweaters, all things pumpkin and apple. This Apple Cobbler recipe is a MUST make for every fall season. It is made with fresh apples, fa…

I love all four seasons, but fall is my favorite. I love the crisp, cool air, colorful leaves, football games, cozy sweaters, all things pumpkin and apple. This Apple Cobbler recipe is a MUST make for every fall season. It is made with fresh apples, fall spices, and a brown butter-cake like topping that is…

The post Apple Cobbler appeared first on Two Peas & Their Pod.

Our 21 Best Fall Cocktails for Fireside Sippin’

It’s fall, y’all, and while sipping apple cider and pumpkin spice lattes are a given, finding the perfect fall cocktail recipe isn’t so easy. After a season of spritzes and rosé wine, we’re craving cocktails that are equal parts refreshing and cozy. From apple cider margaritas to mulled wine, we rounded up our best fall cocktails (and a couple of mocktails too!).


Our Best Fall Cocktail Recipe

1. Whiskey & Apple Cider Syrup (aka the Only Fall Cocktail You Need in Your Life) 

Is that a hint of orange? A tinge of yellow? As soon as the leaves start to change, grab your favorite rye whiskey, a gallon of apple cider (locally made, if possible!), and a couple of other easy aromatic ingredients to prepare the ultimate fall cocktail.

Read More >>

It’s fall, y’all, and while sipping apple cider and pumpkin spice lattes are a given, finding the perfect fall cocktail recipe isn’t so easy. After a season of spritzes and rosé wine, we’re craving cocktails that are equal parts refreshing and cozy. From apple cider margaritas to mulled wine, we rounded up our best fall cocktails (and a couple of mocktails too!).


Our Best Fall Cocktail Recipe

1. Whiskey & Apple Cider Syrup (aka the Only Fall Cocktail You Need in Your Life) 

Is that a hint of orange? A tinge of yellow? As soon as the leaves start to change, grab your favorite rye whiskey, a gallon of apple cider (locally made, if possible!), and a couple of other easy aromatic ingredients to prepare the ultimate fall cocktail.

Read More >>

Chocolate Hazelnut Tart

I’m back on the wagon of tackling the recipes in the bulging files of recipes that I’ve been collecting and hanging on to for the past thirty years. Many pre-date the internet and were from food magazines (made of paper) that I subscribed to. A surprising number of the savory recipes have the words “adobo” or “chipotle,” and “pork” in the title, so if I ever…

I’m back on the wagon of tackling the recipes in the bulging files of recipes that I’ve been collecting and hanging on to for the past thirty years. Many pre-date the internet and were from food magazines (made of paper) that I subscribed to. A surprising number of the savory recipes have the words “adobo” or “chipotle,” and “pork” in the title, so if I ever want to write a book of well-seasoned pork recipes, I’ve got plenty of inspiration.

This one is from Gourmet magazine way back in 2004, a few years before they ceased publishing. I knew people in the test kitchen at Gourmet and they thoroughly tested their recipes, so you know they’re going to work. Gourmet was “modernized” under its last editor, Ruth Reichl, but the test kitchen remained a constant; she knew the value of a solid recipe and good testers. She also knew the appeal of a great photo and Romulo Yanes, who recently passed away, created many of the great images that Gourmet was known for.

Many questioned why Condé Nast killed Gourmet but not Bon Appétit, but the subscription numbers were more favorable for the latter, which didn’t end well, and is now undergoing another revamp. I, for one, am happy that there hasn’t been that much turnover here at the blog, but I should probably shake things up here at some point, too.

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