Corn Salsa

Summer and sweet corn are a match made in heaven! I grew up in Illinois, where the corn is plentiful, and we always ate A LOT of sweet corn during the hot summer months. I loved eating it right of the cob, with lots of butter and salt, but I also enjoy…

Summer and sweet corn are a match made in heaven! I grew up in Illinois, where the corn is plentiful, and we always ate A LOT of sweet corn during the hot summer months. I loved eating it right of the cob, with lots of butter and salt, but I also enjoyed making fresh Corn…

The post Corn Salsa appeared first on Two Peas & Their Pod.

Chorizo Corn Pizza

We love making homemade pizza and during the summer months, this Chorizo Corn Pizza is a favorite. I know it might sound strange at first, but everyone who tries it falls in love after one bite. The flavors are fantastic! This pizza is the best during …

We love making homemade pizza and during the summer months, this Chorizo Corn Pizza is a favorite. I know it might sound strange at first, but everyone who tries it falls in love after one bite. The flavors are fantastic! This pizza is the best during sweet corn season, you can’t beat fresh sweet corn,…

The post Chorizo Corn Pizza appeared first on Two Peas & Their Pod.

17 Corn Side Dishes for Peak Summer Flavor All Year Long

Even though corn on the cob doesn’t peak until later in the summer, when it’s good, it’s excellent. Growing up, I ate boiled corn on the cob, lightly butter and salted, at least three times a week as a side dish for dinner during the summer. It got stu…

Even though corn on the cob doesn’t peak until later in the summer, when it’s good, it’s excellent. Growing up, I ate boiled corn on the cob, lightly butter and salted, at least three times a week as a side dish for dinner during the summer. It got stuck in my teeth and stayed there for days no matter how much dental floss I went through, but it was worth it for that sweet, milky flavor and powerful crunch with each and every bite. Of course boiled corn is great (especially when served alongside, say a 1½-lb. whole lobster...not that I’m being picky or anything) but there are so many other incredible ways to enjoy corn on the cob, too.

For Thanksgiving, many families (mine included) enjoy scoop after scoop of corn pudding and slice after slice of cornbread. If you're in a part of the country that gets good corn on the cob during fall (let me know, because I'd like to move there please), we’ve got a fabulous method for roasting it in the oven as well as modern takes on classic recipes like corn casserole, corn fritters, and elote (Mexican street corn). And when you’re missing corn come the dead of winter, we’ve got a few special recipes that make use of frozen corn kernels.

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baked farro with summer vegetables

If things seem a little quiet around here this summer, do know that it’s less because I’m out having a hot vax summer and more because I’m in my own personal quarantine-for-a-good-cause: finishing up my third cookbook, which …

If things seem a little quiet around here this summer, do know that it’s less because I’m out having a hot vax summer and more because I’m in my own personal quarantine-for-a-good-cause: finishing up my third cookbook, which will be out next fall. Although I’m somewhat (“somewhat”) panicked by the vanishing weeks between now and the deadline, I am so excited about this book and I can’t wait to tell you more about it, you know, should I survive the photoshoot and edits. (If you’ve spent some time on this site, you know what a forbidding task the copyeditor has ahead.)

what you'll need

But I can’t let another week go by without telling you about the most delicious, pinnacle-of-summer baked grain dish that has ever existed in my kitchen. The origin of this recipe is pasta bake that a favorite* reader named Marcia sent me several years ago from a Williams-Sonoma catalogue. It’s a summer staple for her and she thinks it’s fantastic because all of the ingredients are easy for her to get fresh and local. If you have a CSA or garden or farmers market access right now, boy, would they like to sell some corn, tomatoes, and zucchini! The first time I made it I used penne, as the recipe recommends and it was spectacularly delicious. So why do I use farro instead here? Because the sauce is so good, it doesn’t want to share the spotlight with big pieces of pasta. Farro, small, nutty and slightly chewy, is a fantastic supporting cast member, while adding a heft that makes it clearly dinner-y.

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12 Warm-Weather Recipes We’re Making in August Because It’s Still Summer, Dang It

I was raised by a family of schoolteachers, which meant that we all dreaded the month of August. The school season was just around the corner and thus, the end of summer was drawing near. In our house, you weren’t allowed to ask “when’s the first day o…

I was raised by a family of schoolteachers, which meant that we all dreaded the month of August. The school season was just around the corner and thus, the end of summer was drawing near. In our house, you weren’t allowed to ask “when’s the first day of school?” or turn to my parents and say, “oh, are you excited to go back to work?” You would swiftly be cut off before you could finish the sentence because who wants to think about going back to school in the middle of July? 

But in August’s defense, there are some pretty wonderful things that happen this month, too. A streak of beautiful weather, and a bounty of incredible produce to take advantage of. Think eggplant, tomatoes, corn on the cob (finally!!!), plus sweet berries and stone fruit. So don’t think about the list of school supplies that will soon show up in the mail or the fact that you have to eat a cafeteria lunch at 10:58 a.m. For now, embrace several more weeks of summer with these recipes to make all throughout the month of August. They’ve all been hand-picked by our editorial team, so you know they’re good.

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Oven Roasted Corn with Honey Chili Butter

Oven roasting is hands down my favorite way to prepare vegetables and that includes fresh summer sweet corn. Roasting the fresh ears while still in their husks keeps them ultra sweet and juicy, plus it’s just so incredibly simple. I added some sweet and spicy honey chili butter to rub onto the roasted corn but, […]

The post Oven Roasted Corn with Honey Chili Butter appeared first on Budget Bytes.

Oven roasting is hands down my favorite way to prepare vegetables and that includes fresh summer sweet corn. Roasting the fresh ears while still in their husks keeps them ultra sweet and juicy, plus it’s just so incredibly simple. I added some sweet and spicy honey chili butter to rub onto the roasted corn but, truth be told, when corn is prepared this way it’s so good that I’d be just as happy eating it plain!

Originally posted 5-20-2011, updated 7-27-2021.

Oven roasted corn half shucked and smeared with honey chili butter on a white tray with a bowl of butter

Why Roast in the Husk?

Leaving the husk on the corn while it roasts helps hold in the corn’s natural moisture, yielding super juicy kernels that pop with sweetness when you bite into them. It’s truly amazing. Once the corn has roasted, the husks and silk peel away easily so it’s ready to eat in no time.

How to Pick Good Fresh Corn

Choosing corn that is fresh and in season is key because that’s when the corn is the sweetest and juiciest. Older corn can tend to be dry and more starchy rather than sweet. To make sure your corn is fresh, look for husks that are bright green, tight against the cob, and not dry or brown. If the silk is sticking out the top, it should look fresh, moist, and maybe a bit brown, but never black, shriveled, or dry. 

What to Serve with Oven Roasted Corn

Just give me this sweet, sweet corn by itself and I’ll be happy. But alas, that’s not a very well-rounded meal, so here are some ideas of what you can serve with this amazing corn: Fish Tacos with Cumin Lime Coleslaw, BBQ Cheddar Baked Chicken, Beef Taco Skillet, Baked Beef and Black Bean Tacos, or Cilantro Lime Chicken.

About That Honey Chili Butter…

As if the juicy roasted corn wasn’t magic enough, have you tried honey chili butter yet?? It’s perfectly sweet, a little spicy, and creamy like a dream. The heat level of the honey chili butter will depend on how spicy your chili powder is. Some brands, like McCormick, are very mild, while others can carry some substantial heat. Keep your leftover honey chili butter in the fridge, where it should stay good for a few weeks. 

Close up of oven roasted corn with a bowl of honey chili butter

Oven roasted corn on a tray, partially shucked, with a bowl of honey chili butter

Oven Roasted Corn with Honey Chili Butter

Super sweet and juicy oven-roasted corn slathered with sweet and spicy honey chili butter is a true summer treat.
Total Cost $1.75 recipe / $0.44 serving
Prep Time 5 minutes
Cook Time 35 minutes
Total Time 40 minutes
Servings 4 1 ear each
Calories 194kcal
Author Beth - Budget Bytes

Ingredients

  • 4 ears fresh corn $1.20
  • 4 Tbsp butter, room temperature $0.37
  • 1 Tbsp honey $0.12
  • 1/2 tsp chili powder $0.05
  • 1/8 tsp salt $0.01

Instructions

  • Preheat the oven to 350ºF. Prepare the ears of corn by cutting off the very tip of the ear to remove most of the silk, and removing the outer husks (the thicker bright green layers), leaving the inner layers (the thinner lighter green husks).
  • Transfer the prepared ears of corn to the fully preheated oven, placing them directly on the oven rack. Roast for 35 minutes.
  • While the corn is roasting, prepare the honey chili butter. In a small bowl, combine the butter, chili powder, honey, and salt. Whip the mixture with a fork until smooth and evenly combined.
  • After 35 minutes the husks on the corn should be slightly browned and papery in appearance. Carefully remove the corn from the oven using oven mitts or a thick towel. Let them rest for about five minutes, then carefully pull back the husks and remove any remaining silk.
  • Serve hot with the bowl of honey butter for smearing over the kernels just before eating.

Nutrition

Serving: 1Serving | Calories: 194kcal | Carbohydrates: 21g | Protein: 3g | Fat: 13g | Sodium: 190mg | Fiber: 2g

 

How to Make Oven Roasted Corn – Step By Step Photos

Four fresh ears of corn, two prepped

Preheat the oven to 350ºF. To prep the ears of corn, cut the very tip off to remove most of the silk, then remove the first couple of layers of husk, leaving a few layers of the thinner husks. Basically, just remove the thicker bright green husks leaving the more tender leaves still attached (prepped ears on the right, unprepped ears on the left). Place the prepped ears of corn in the fully preheated oven, directly on the oven rack. Roast for about 35 minutes.

Butter, chili powder, and honey in a bowl

While the corn is roasting, prepare the honey chili butter. Combine 4 Tbsp room temperature butter with 1 Tbsp honey, ½ tsp chili powder, and ⅛ tsp salt.

Prepared honey chili butter in a bowl with a fork

Use a fork to sort of whip the honey chili butter together until it is evenly mixed. Set the butter aside.

Roasted corn on a tray

After the corn has roasted for 35 minutes, the husks should look slightly browned and more papery. Remove them from the oven (use an oven mitt or thick towel to grab them). I placed them on this tray just to transport them, but they roasted directly on the oven rack with no tray. Let them rest for a few minutes, then carefully peel back the husks. The remaining silk will pull off easily.

Oven roasted corn on a tray, partially shucked, with a bowl of honey chili butter

After removing the husks and silk, smear honey chili butter over the warm ears of corn. Serve immediately!

The post Oven Roasted Corn with Honey Chili Butter appeared first on Budget Bytes.

How to Grill Corn in the Husk

Grilling corn in husks is a unique method that’s absolutely worth trying! It’s easy and results in deliciously moist, sweet…

A Couple Cooks – Recipes worth repeating.

Grilling corn in husks is a unique method that’s absolutely worth trying! It’s easy and results in deliciously moist, sweet flavor.

How to grill corn in the husk

What’s better than sinking your teeth into the buttery pop of flavor that is summer sweet corn? There are so many ways to cook this summer treat, from boiled to grilled to even oven roasted. But here’s a new method that’s won us over: grilling corn in the husk! It requires a bit of know how, but it results in a fantastic flavor: beautifully moist and sweet, with a nutty nuance from roasting in the husk.

Grilling corn in husk: pros and cons!

The standard method for grilling corn? Shuck it and place it right onto the grill grates, so it gets beautifully charred. Another popular method is grilling corn in foil, which comes out extremely moist but no smoky grill flavor. Grilling corn in the husk is like a combination of the two methods!

  • Grilling corn in the husk results in moist, juicy corn (like the foil method) with a hint of charred nuttiness (like the grill grates method).
  • Some tradeoffs? Prep takes some time: you’ll have to remove the silk from each cob, and soak them for at least 20 minutes. It also takes slightly longer to grill than the grates method, and the cooking is slightly more uneven.

Is it worth it? After tasting it, we think so! We still like our perfect grilled corn method for ease of use, but this one is definitely up there flavor-wise. Plus, the husks come out fantastically blackened which looks visually impressive.

Grilled corn on the cob in husk

How to grill corn in the husk: basic steps

Ready to try this method? Grilling corn in the husk requires a bit of prep work, but it’s well worth it. Here are the two steps you’ll need to do that you might not think of before starting:

  • You’ll need to remove the silk. Yes, it’s a little fussy! Remove the silk of the corn, then pull the husks back up. This makes eating it easier once it comes off the grill.
  • Soak the cobs for 20 minutes. The husks are going to get very blackened on the grill grates. So to prevent them from catching fire, you’ll need to soak them first!
  • Preheat the grill to medium high: that’s 375 to 450 degrees.
  • Grill for 20 to 22 minutes. Turn them to get even blackening on the outside of the husk.

Again, the prep work is worth it! Grilling corn in the husk gives it a roasty, charred flavor but keeps it moist instead of drying out (like in our Perfect Grilled Corn method).

How to grill corn in the husk

Make it a meal!

Once you’ve got your lovely charred corn in the husk, it’s totally showy! It’s perfect for a grilled summer meal, cooked up with your favorite proteins, grilled sides, or a summer salad. Here are a few of our favorite ways to make a summer-time dinner:

Grilling Corn in Husk

More ways to cook corn on the cob

How to cook corn on the cob? Let us count the ways! As we noted above, there are pros and cons to each method. Here’s a breakdown:

This grilled corn in husk recipe is…

Vegetarian, vegan, plant-based, dairy-free, and gluten-free.

Print
How to grill corn in the husk

How to Grill Corn in the Husk


  • Author: Sonja Overhiser
  • Prep Time: 30 minutes
  • Cook Time: 20 minutes
  • Total Time: 50 minutes
  • Yield: 8
  • Diet: Vegan

Ingredients

  • 8 ears corn
  • Butter and salt, for serving

Instructions

  1. Remove the silk: Remove any loose husks from the corn cobs. Shuck the corn by peeling down the outside layers one at a time and keeping them attached, facing downwards away from the cob. Remove the silk, then pull the husks back up over the corn (it can be a bit messy, so it doesn’t have to be perfect!).
  2. Soak 20 minutes: Soak the corn cobs in cool water for at least 20 minutes to prevent scorching.
  3. Preheat: Heat a grill to medium high heat (375 to 450 degrees Fahrenheit). 
  4. Grill the corn: Place the corn directly on the grill grates and cook until the husk begins to blacken, then turn. Cook 20 to 22 minutes total, until the corn is cooked through (the outside husk will be charred). To check whether it’s done, pull back the husk on one corn to make sure it is bright yellow and cooked through all the way to the bottom of the cob. (You can air on the side of over-cooking it, since you may find the cooking is fairly uneven in the husk.) Serve immediately with butter and salt.
  • Category: Side dish
  • Method: Grilled
  • Cuisine: American

Keywords: Grilling corn in husk, grilled corn on the cob in husk, how to grill corn in the husk

A Couple Cooks - Recipes worth repeating.

Blueberry Corn Salad

The summer produce is so good right now, I can’t get enough. I have been making lots and lots of salads: cucumber salad, tomato salad, easy orzo salad, watermelon salad…just to name a few! At the market, I picked up blueberries and sweet co…

The summer produce is so good right now, I can’t get enough. I have been making lots and lots of salads: cucumber salad, tomato salad, easy orzo salad, watermelon salad…just to name a few! At the market, I picked up blueberries and sweet corn because they looked so good. I made one of my favorite…

The post Blueberry Corn Salad appeared first on Two Peas & Their Pod.

Sweet Corn Salsa

Fresh and juicy summer sweet corn makes the best corn salsa for topping tacos, salads, bowl meals, or dipping with your favorite chips.

The post Sweet Corn Salsa appeared first on Budget Bytes.

If you’ve never raw fresh sweet corn, let this recipe be a sign that you totally need to try it. Fresh sweet corn is one of the best parts of summer and when it’s raw it is deliciously sweet, crunchy, and *juicy*. And this Fresh Sweet Corn Salsa is the perfect way for you to dip your toes into the waters and experience the awesomeness that is raw sweet corn.

Overhead view of a bowl of sweet corn salsa with lime and salt on the side

What’s in Corn Salsa?

I like to keep things simple in life, so I made my corn salsa super simple, kind of like a pico de gallo with corn. It has fresh sweet corn, tomatoes, red onion, jalapeño, cilantro, lime juice, and salt. That’s it! It hits all my favorite flavor elements: sweet, salty, acidic, and spicy!

Do You Have to Use Fresh Corn?

You don’t have to use fresh corn for this salsa, but it’s definitely going to make the salsa top-notch. If you want to make this salsa in the off-season or just don’t have good fresh corn available, the next best choice would be frozen corn. I don’t suggest canned corn for this recipe because it will definitely throw the flavor off since it is canned in liquid that usually contains both sugar and salt.

If you want to use fresh corn but just don’t want to use raw corn, grilling the corn first will give this salsa a nice smokey flavor. You can also just do your usual boil, steam, or oven roasting.

If you need help knowing how to pick the best fresh corn, check out this short tutorial from Taste of Home about How to Pick the Best Corn.

What Else Can You Add?

If you do want to fancy it up some, here are some other great flavors that would be awesome in corn salsa:

  • Avocado (the fat will balance the heat nicely)
  • Cotija cheese
  • Green onion (a great sub for red onion, if needed)
  • Black beans
  • Red bell pepper

How to Serve Corn Salsa

Corn salsa is that great all-purpose summer condiment or side. You can serve it on things or just as a sort of side salad to your meal. I served mine this week on top of my Fish Tacos, but it would also be great with Beef Taco Skillet, Green Chile Chicken Enchiladas, Easy Cilantro Chicken, Creamy White Bean and Spinach Quesadillas, or Black Bean and Avocado Enchiladas.

Close up shot of fresh corn salsa from the side
overhead view of a bowl full of corn salsa

Sweet Corn Salsa

Fresh and juicy summer sweet corn makes the best corn salsa for topping tacos, salads, bowl meals, or dipping with your favorite chips.
Total Cost $2.65 recipe / $0.44 serving
Prep Time 15 minutes
Total Time 15 minutes
Servings 6 ½ cup each
Calories 83kcal
Author Beth – Budget Bytes

Ingredients

  • 3 ears sweet corn $0.90
  • 2 Roma tomatoes $0.93
  • 1/4 cup diced red onion $0.07
  • 1 jalapeño $0.07
  • 1/4 cup chopped cilantro $0.17
  • 1 fresh lime (2 Tbsp juice) $0.50
  • 1/2 tsp salt $0.02

Instructions

  • Remove the husks and silk from the fresh corn. Cut the stem off the bottom to create a flat, stable surface on which to stand the ear of corn. Stand the ear of corn upright, stem side down, and slice downward with a sharp knife to remove the kernels. Place the sliced kernels in a large bowl.
  • Dice the tomatoes. Remove the seeds from the jalapeño, then finely dice. Finely dice the red onion, and roughly chop the cilantro. Add the tomatoes, jalapeño, onion, and cilantro to the bowl with the corn.
  • Juice the lime then drizzle about 2 Tbsp of the juice on top of the vegetables. Sprinkle the salt over top, give everything a good stir, taste, then adjust the lime or salt to your liking. Serve immediately.

Nutrition

Serving: 0.5cup | Calories: 83kcal | Carbohydrates: 18g | Protein: 3g | Fat: 1g | Sodium: 196mg | Fiber: 2g
side view of a bowl full of fresh sweet corn salsa

How to Make Sweet Corn Salsa – Step by Step Photos

corn kernels sliced off an ear of corn in a baking tray

Remove the husk and silk from three ears of fresh sweet corn. Slice the stem off the bottom to create a flat surface on which to stand the ear of corn. Stand the ear up on its end, then use a sharp knife to slice downward to remove the kernels. I like to do this on a rimmed baking sheet to catch the kernels as they fall.

Diced roma tomatoes on a cutting board

Dice three Roma tomatoes. Try to make it a small dice, similar in size to the corn kernels.

Diced jalapeño, red onion, and chopped cilantro

Remove the seeds from one jalapeño, then finely dice. Finely dice about ¼ cup red onion and roughly chop about ¼ cup fresh cilantro.

lime juice being drizzled over the bowl of salsa ingredients

Add the corn, tomatoes, jalapeño, red onion, and cilantro to a bowl. Squeeze the juice from one lime, then add about 2 Tbsp of the juice to the bowl. Sprinkle ½ tsp salt over top.

Stirred fresh corn salsa in the bowl

Stir until everything is combined and coated in juice and salt.

overhead view of a bowl full of corn salsa

Serve immediately or refrigerate for later. If refrigerating, make sure to give it a good stir before serving to redistribute the juices.

The post Sweet Corn Salsa appeared first on Budget Bytes.

Fish Tacos with Cumin Lime Slaw

Earlier this week I made a big batch of sunny and fresh Cumin Lime Coleslaw, but I didn’t intend to just eat coleslaw all week. So, I used the coleslaw as a topping for these super simple fish tacos. I love making tacos for dinner because they’re so easy, fresh, and not too heavy, which […]

The post Fish Tacos with Cumin Lime Slaw appeared first on Budget Bytes.

Earlier this week I made a big batch of sunny and fresh Cumin Lime Coleslaw, but I didn’t intend to just eat coleslaw all week. So, I used the coleslaw as a topping for these super simple fish tacos. I love making tacos for dinner because they’re so easy, fresh, and not too heavy, which is great when it’s 100 degrees outside. I like to keep my tacos pretty simple (in this case just fish, slaw, jalapeño, and avocado), but I’ve got some suggestions for extra toppings below if you want them! ;)

Originally posted 3-27-2015, updated 7-15-2021.

Overhead view of fish tacos on a platter, toppings on the sides

What’s in a Fish Taco?

For these fish tacos, I seasoned some white fish filets with a simple mix of chili powder, cumin, garlic, and salt, then cooked them up quickly in a skillet. I topped them with tangy Cumin Lime Coleslaw, a slice of creamy avocado, and a couple super thin slices of jalapeño. It’s the perfect mix of earthy, spicy, creamy, and tangy. 

What Kind of Fish is Best for Tacos?

I used cod fillets for my fish tacos because they have a mild flavor that can be easily paired with any seasoning or toppings. You could also use something like tilapia, halibut, mahi mahi, snapper, or grouper. I usually get the best prices on frozen fillets, and they usually come individually wrapped, so you can thaw as many as you need and keep the rest in the freezer for later. 

What Else Can I Add?

Tacos are fun because you can get creative with the toppings. If you want to swap out some of the toppings I used for something else, or just want to add to what is listed in the recipe below, here are some ideas:

What Kind of Tortillas?

Corn tortillas are the traditional option for tacos, but go ahead and use whatever you like best. Cooking is about doing what works for you. So if you like flour tortillas or crunchy taco shells better or happen to have those on hand, use them. :) If you’re using corn tortillas, make sure to toast them before making your tacos so they get that deliciously toasty corn flavor (otherwise they kind of taste like nothing). And keep in mind that if you use larger tortillas you’ll get fewer tacos out of the ingredients listed below.

What to Serve with Fish Tacos

Two tacos does not a meal make, so here are some ideas for sides:

Side view of fish tacos on a platter

Fish tacos on a platter with toppings on the sides

Fish Tacos with Cumin Lime Slaw

These super easy Fish Tacos with Cumin Lime Slaw are light, fresh, and the perfect quick dinner for hot summer nights, or any night!
Total Cost $9.17 recipe / $2.29 serving
Prep Time 10 minutes
Cook Time 20 minutes
Total Time 30 minutes
Servings 4 (2 Tacos each)
Calories 437kcal
Author Beth - Budget Bytes

Ingredients

Cumin Lime Coleslaw

  • 1/4 cup mayonnaise $0.40
  • 1 lime (1 Tbsp juice) $0.50
  • 1/2 tsp ground cumin $0.05
  • 1/8 tsp cayenne $0.01
  • 1/2 tsp sugar $0.01
  • 1/4 tsp salt $0.01
  • 1/2 16oz. bag coleslaw mix (shredded cabbage and carrots) $0.75
  • 2 green onions, sliced $0.22

Tacos

  • 8 small corn tortillas $0.80
  • 2 tsp chili powder $0.20
  • 1/2 tsp ground cumin $0.05
  • 1/4 tsp garlic powder $0.02
  • 1/8 tsp salt $0.01
  • 1 Tbsp cooking oil $0.04
  • 1 lb. cod fillets* $4.96
  • 1 avocado, sliced $0.99
  • 1 jalapeño, sliced $0.15

Instructions

  • Toast the tortillas in a dry skillet over medium heat until browned on each side. Stack the tortillas and cover with foil to keep warm.
  • Make the cumin lime coleslaw next. For the dressing, stir together the mayonnaise, 1 Tbsp lime juice, cumin, cayenne, salt, and sugar.
  • Place the coleslaw mix and sliced green onions in a bowl, pour the coleslaw dressing over top and stir to combine. Refrigerate until you're ready to build your tacos.
  • Next, season the fish fillets. Combine the chili powder, cumin, garlic powder, and salt. Cut each fish fillet into smaller taco-sized pieces. Season both sides of the fish with the spice mix.
  • Add half of the cooking oil to a large skillet and heat over medium. Once hot, add half of the fish and cook for a few minutes on each side or until the fish is cooked through (it will feel firm, look opaque, and be easily flaked). Repeat with more oil and the second batch of fish.
  • Top each toasted tortilla with a piece of fish, a slice of avocado, a small scoop of the cumin lime slaw, and a couple slices of jalapeño. Enjoy warm.

Notes

*You can use just about any type of white fish for this, like tilapia, mahi mahi, or halibut.

Nutrition

Serving: 2Tacos | Calories: 437kcal | Carbohydrates: 33g | Protein: 25g | Fat: 24g | Sodium: 424mg | Fiber: 9g

How to Make Fish Tacos – Step by Step Photos

corn tortillas being toasted in a skillet

If you’re using corn tortillas you’ll want to toast them before making your tacos. This gives them more flavor and helps make them a bit more sturdy. I do this in a dry skillet over fairly high heat, but if you have a gas range you can do it right over an open flame (just a second or two on each side). You can keep them warm on a plate covered with foil.

Cumin lime slaw ingredients in a bowl, dressing being poured

Next, prepare the cumin lime coleslaw so it’s ready to go when the fish finishes cooking. To make the dressing, stir together 1 Tbsp lime juice, ¼ cup mayonnaise, ½ tsp cumin, ¼ tsp slat, ⅛ tsp cayenne, and ½ tsp sugar. Place ½ of a bag of coleslaw mix (shredded cabbage and carrots) in a bowl with 2 sliced green onions. Pour the dressing over top. You can also wait to pour the dressing over until just before serving, if preferred.

finished cumin lime coleslaw in bowl

Stir to coat the vegetables in dressing, then refrigerate until ready to build your tacos. 

Seasoned fish fillets

Next, make the seasoning mix for the fish. Combine 2 tsp chili powder (this is a mild blend of chiles and other spices), ½ tsp ground cumin, ¼ tsp garlic powder, and ⅛ tsp salt. Cut 1 lb. fish into taco-sized pieces (in this case I had four fillets, so I cut each in half for one piece per taco). Season the fish on both sides with the prepared spice mix.

Fish cooked in the skillet

Heat ½ Tbsp cooking oil in a skillet over medium heat. Once hot, add half of the fish and cook for a few minutes on each side, or until cooked through (the fish will be opaque and easily flake when cooked). Repeat with a little more oil and the second batch of fish.

Tacos being built

To build the tacos, place one piece of fish in each tortilla, add one slice of avocado, a small scoop of cumin lime coleslaw, and a couple slices of jalapeño.

Fish tacos on a platter with toppings on the sides

If you have leftover lime from making the slaw, slice it into wedges to serve with the tacos.

close up of a fish taco in a hand

Enjoy that summery goodness!

The post Fish Tacos with Cumin Lime Slaw appeared first on Budget Bytes.