Butterscotch Bars

It’s been an interesting year, hasn’t it? I’ve been on a bit of a bender lately, getting rid of (or at least, reducing) paperwork that’s been piling up and holds little interest for me. I have so much that I had to buy more paper (as in, paper file folders) to store all that paperwork in which seems redundant, but living in a place where paper…

It’s been an interesting year, hasn’t it? I’ve been on a bit of a bender lately, getting rid of (or at least, reducing) paperwork that’s been piling up and holds little interest for me. I have so much that I had to buy more paper (as in, paper file folders) to store all that paperwork in which seems redundant, but living in a place where paper still rules supreme, and digitizing takes as long as filing, I’m stuck filing and storing.

One change in the world of paper has been food blogs, which started out for many as being places where you could “store” and share your favorite recipes. But I’ve noticed over the last few years that food blogs have become a lot slicker, more polished, and often “aspirational.” While I’m jealous of those who have the talent, and patience, for writing for search engines, and arranging flowers on top of multi-layer cakes, I really just enjoy cooking and baking.

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S’more cookies, please

Campfire in a cookie sums up these summer fun treats with chocolate ganache, buttecream, graham cracker crumbs and toasted meringue. You’ll be saying gimme s’more with every bite. Bonus: you don’t need a fire pit to make them. Just a handy little kitchen torch and you’ll be ready to go. Let me show you. Okay, […]

Campfire in a cookie sums up these summer fun treats with chocolate ganache, buttecream, graham cracker crumbs and toasted meringue.

S'more Cookie

You’ll be saying gimme s’more with every bite.

S'mores Cookies

Bonus: you don’t need a fire pit to make them. Just a handy little kitchen torch and you’ll be ready to go. Let me show you.

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Boston Cream Pie

Boston Cream Pie is one of my favorite desserts of all time. It was one of the options in the cafeteria line at my elementary school and the one I always grabbed and put on my tray, next to my codfish sticks, boiled potatoes with parsley, and butter sandwiches on dense Pepperidge Farm-style white bread, which they served in half-portions, each rectangle slipped into a…

Boston Cream Pie is one of my favorite desserts of all time. It was one of the options in the cafeteria line at my elementary school and the one I always grabbed and put on my tray, next to my codfish sticks, boiled potatoes with parsley, and butter sandwiches on dense Pepperidge Farm-style white bread, which they served in half-portions, each rectangle slipped into a brown waxed bag. (The other option was peanut butter.)

I still remember finishing lunch and diving in with my fork to that wedge of golden sponge cake filled with rich, vanilla custard. In a world that seems hopelessly in favor of milk chocolate (which I’ve come to appreciate), there was a deep-dark chocolate glaze on top, which may have been my first taste of bittersweet chocolate. And one I never forgot.

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Spiced Kefta

Persian food, like many of the foods from a region that’s often broadly referred to as the Middle East, takes cues from a variety of influences and cultures as people traverse borders and bring their delicious foods with them. Which is why the food in America is so diverse; people have gifted us with foods from their homelands, such as tacos, sushi, pizza, beer, and…

Persian food, like many of the foods from a region that’s often broadly referred to as the Middle East, takes cues from a variety of influences and cultures as people traverse borders and bring their delicious foods with them. Which is why the food in America is so diverse; people have gifted us with foods from their homelands, such as tacos, sushi, pizza, beer, and bagels. Similarly, France has been blessed to have beans for cassoulet, chocolat chaud (hot chocolate), and croissants.

As a cook, I like dipping into various cuisines and cultures and lately, I’ve been working on Tahdig, a Persian rice dish that’s cooked on the stovetop until the bottom gets crusty, which can take an hour or longer, and requires some patience. Once done, you take a leap of faith and turn it out onto a plate so the crispy part (the tahdig) forms a golden, crackly crown on top of a bed of fragrant, saffron-infused rice…if you do it right.

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Creamy Coconut Margarita

This coconut margarita recipe is the cocktail you didn’t know you were missing! It’s zingy and creamy, pairing lime and tequila with coconut. Here’s a drink that’s creamy, cool, refreshing and an absolute must for any margarita lover: this Coconut Margarita recipe! After trying 30+ margarita variations, this one rose to the top because it’s not like any other margarita variation you’ve tried! Tropical coconut pairs perfectly with the zing of lime and bite of tequila. The best part? The toasted coconut drink rim gives you a crunchy, tropical infusion to each sip. We love all our margarita recipes, but this one…this one is special. Ingredients in a coconut margarita The margarita was invented in Mexico in the 1930’s, and today remains one of the most popular classic cocktails of all time. The Classic Margarita has just 3 ingredients: tequila, triple sec and lime juice. For the coconut spin, add cremHere are the ingredients you’ll need for a raspberry margarita: Tequila Triple Sec (or Cointreau) Lime juice Cream of coconut (not coconut cream) Sweetened shredded coconut, for the rim Buy cream of coconut, not coconut cream The most important thing about this coconut margarita is making sure to buy the right coconut product. Buy […]

A Couple Cooks – Healthy, Whole Food, & Vegetarian Recipes

This coconut margarita recipe is the cocktail you didn’t know you were missing! It’s zingy and creamy, pairing lime and tequila with coconut.

Coconut margarita

Here’s a drink that’s creamy, cool, refreshing and an absolute must for any margarita lover: this Coconut Margarita recipe! After trying 30+ margarita variations, this one rose to the top because it’s not like any other margarita variation you’ve tried! Tropical coconut pairs perfectly with the zing of lime and bite of tequila. The best part? The toasted coconut drink rim gives you a crunchy, tropical infusion to each sip. We love all our margarita recipes, but this one…this one is special.

Ingredients in a coconut margarita

The margarita was invented in Mexico in the 1930’s, and today remains one of the most popular classic cocktails of all time. The Classic Margarita has just 3 ingredients: tequila, triple sec and lime juice. For the coconut spin, add cremHere are the ingredients you’ll need for a raspberry margarita:

Buy cream of coconut, not coconut cream

The most important thing about this coconut margarita is making sure to buy the right coconut product. Buy cream of coconut, not coconut cream! A good rule of thumb? Opt for the squeeze bottle, not the can. Here’s more about what to know:

  • Cream of coconut is a sweetened syrup used for cocktails. It’s made with coconut cream and sugar. It’s sold in handy squeeze bottles to make it easy to add to drinks. Cream of coconut is easy to find online or at your local liquor store. A popular brand is Coco Real.
  • Coconut cream is unsweetened! It’s thick with a strong coconut flavor and sold in cans next to the coconut milk. Coconut cream is made from chilling coconut milk and then skimming off the layer of cream that floats to the top.

Want help using up the cream of coconut bottle? Try the Piña Colada, Painkiller or Bushwacker.

Coconut margarita recipe

What if you accidentally buy coconut cream?

You can save your coconut margarita if you buy the wrong one. Here’s what to do: Use 1/2 ounce coconut cream and 1/2 ounce simple syrup in place of the 1 ounces cream of coconut.

How to make a toasted coconut rim!

The best part of this coconut margarita recipe? The toasted coconut rim! Drink rims are not just fun visually: they add a textural element and pop of flavor to each sip. Here’s what to know about making this drink rim:

  • Toast the coconut. Here’s how to toast coconut — we used the stovetop instructions which takes just a few minutes. Just make sure to keep an eye on it: coconut can go from raw to burned in a flash!
  • Use the cream of coconut to adhere the coconut. Alex had a stroke of genius with this drink: he used the cream of coconut to stick the coconut to the glass. It works like a charm!
  • Dip the rim in cream of coconut, then a plate of toasted coconut. You’ll just want the outer edge of the glass to be covered. It takes a little time, but it’s worth it for the flavor!
Coconut margarita

Make a coconut margarita pitcher (8 servings)

Serving a crowd? Mix up a coconut margarita pitcher instead! A pitcher is more efficient because it makes 8 servings in just 5 minutes! Here’s what to mix:

  • 2 cups tequila
  • 1/2 cup triple sec
  • 1/2 cup lime juice
  • 1 cup cream of coconut
  • 3 handfuls ice

Throw them in a pitcher, mix, and enjoy! Let us know what you think of this tasty drink in the comments below.

More unique margarita recipes

Coconut margarita

When to serve a coconut margarita

The coconut margarita is creamy and impressive! It works as a:

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Coconut margarita

Creamy Coconut Margarita


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  • Author: Sonja Overhiser
  • Prep Time: 5 minutes
  • Cook Time: 0 minutes
  • Total Time: 5 minutes
  • Yield: 1 drink
  • Diet: Vegan

Description

This coconut margarita recipe is the cocktail you didn’t know you were missing! It’s zingy and creamy, pairing lime and tequila with coconut. 


Ingredients

  • Sweetened shredded coconut, for the rim
  • 2 ounces tequila blanco
  • 1/2 ounce triple sec (or Cointreau)
  • 1/2 ounce fresh lime juice
  • 1 ounce cream of coconut (not coconut cream)
  • Ice, for serving (try clear ice)

Instructions

  1. Toast the coconut. Remove it from the heat and place it in a single layer on a plate. 
  2. Add a bit of extra cream of coconut to a separate plate and dip the edge of the rim of the glass into it. Then dip the rim into the plate of toasted coconut.
  3. Place the tequila, triple sec, lime juice, and cream of coconut in a cocktail shaker and add one handful ice. Shake until cold. Strain the margarita into the glass with the coconut rim. Fill the glass with ice and serve.
  4. For a pitcher: add 2 cups tequila, 1/2 cup triple sec, 1/2 cup lime juice, and 1 cup cream of coconut to a pitcher. Add 3 handfuls ice and stir. 
  • Category: Drink
  • Method: Shaken
  • Cuisine: Cocktails

Keywords: Coconut margarita, coconut margarita recipe

A Couple Cooks - Healthy, Whole Food, & Vegetarian Recipes

Secret Ingredient Chocolate Chip Cookies

I’ve made chocolate chip cookies a million times and a bunch of different ways, but I’ve never made them with this secret ingredient addition. The recipe for these satisfying, soft and chewy cookies comes from my blogging friend, Kelly Senyei, creator of Just a Taste and new author of The Secret Ingredient Cookbook. Her book […]

Secret Ingredient Chocolate Chip Cookies

I’ve made chocolate chip cookies a million times and a bunch of different ways, but I’ve never made them with this secret ingredient addition. The recipe for these satisfying, soft and chewy cookies comes from my blogging friend, Kelly Senyei, creator of Just a Taste and new author of The Secret Ingredient Cookbook. Her book is full of familiar recipes with a twist. And if these cookies are any indication, you’ll want to try them all.

Want to know the secret? Let’s find out.

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Canistrelli

The last two cookies I’ve made on this site have been American-style, i.e.; on the larger side, with lots of flavors and other stuff going on. I like those, but I also like “quiet” European cookies, which are often simple, sometimes somewhat plain (like French sablés, or butter cookies), that let you focus on one or two flavors. Canistrelli fit that profile. Originally from Corsica,…

The last two cookies I’ve made on this site have been American-style, i.e.; on the larger side, with lots of flavors and other stuff going on. I like those, but I also like “quiet” European cookies, which are often simple, sometimes somewhat plain (like French sablés, or butter cookies), that let you focus on one or two flavors. Canistrelli fit that profile. Originally from Corsica, Canistrelli are flavored with anise and made with wine, and sometimes chestnut flour, which gives them a husky taste, but it’s not easy to find unless you live in Corsica.

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Cookies & Cream Cheesecake Squares

Cheesecake Squares! These are the perfect size decadent dessert. They are so dense and rich that anything bigger might be too much for one sitting. I’ve made them before with peanut butter cups, Snickers and Kit Kats, too … but these are a little bit taller and made with more filling. Not to mention, each […]

01_Bakerella_Cookies-Cream_Cheesecake_

Cheesecake Squares! These are the perfect size decadent dessert. They are so dense and rich that anything bigger might be too much for one sitting. I’ve made them before with peanut butter cups, Snickers and Kit Kats, too … but these are a little bit taller and made with more filling.

01_Bakerella_Cookies-Cream_Cheesecake_

Not to mention, each one is topped off with chocolate ganache, whipped cream and a full-size Oreo cookie. It’s a lot … but also just right in a roughly 2-inch square treat.

Let’s get into it…

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The Hemingway Daiquiri

I became engrossed with author Ernest Hemingway watching the documentary, Hemingway by filmmakers Ken Burns and Lynn Novick. Hemingway is one of those legends whose name we all know, but most of us don’t know all that much about him. The documentary takes an unflinching look at him, and his legacy, thanks to contemporary writers, literary scholars, and historians, who filled in much of the…

I became engrossed with author Ernest Hemingway watching the documentary, Hemingway by filmmakers Ken Burns and Lynn Novick. Hemingway is one of those legends whose name we all know, but most of us don’t know all that much about him. The documentary takes an unflinching look at him, and his legacy, thanks to contemporary writers, literary scholars, and historians, who filled in much of the biographical information that accompanied his history, which wasn’t always rosy.

Some books of his were big hits while others fell flat. Some consider The Old Man and the Sea a great novel while others described it in unflattering terms. He had a penchant for falling in love madly in love with women, which usually took a turn for the worse…which is being kind. (Although discussed and implied, the relationships sounded harrowing.) He swore at his mother in writings and later, he got an earful in turn from his son, who sent him a letter calling The Old Man and the Sea “sentimental slop.” He married multiple times, suffered debilitating war injuries, drank too much, had affairs, survived two plane crashes, and lived in Cuba, Paris, Key West, before finally settling at the end of his life in Ketchum, Idaho.

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Blueberry Muffin Cake

Zoë François is the author of Zoë Bakes Cakes and even though her name is French, she’s an American cake baker. Known for a series of books on making Artisan Bread in 5 Minutes a Day, as well as books that continue that theme for making pizza, flatbread, holidays breads, and gluten-free breads, Zoë has finally turned her talents as a pastry chef to cakes….

Zoë François is the author of Zoë Bakes Cakes and even though her name is French, she’s an American cake baker. Known for a series of books on making Artisan Bread in 5 Minutes a Day, as well as books that continue that theme for making pizza, flatbread, holidays breads, and gluten-free breads, Zoë has finally turned her talents as a pastry chef to cakes. After growing up in a commune where the closest she got to sugar was a raisin, Zoë discovered Twinkies, which awakened her to the wonderful world of sweets and started selling homemade cookies from a cart in college, which eventually led to a job decorating cakes at Ben & Jerry’s, since she admitted to me on an Instagram Live video I did with her, that she didn’t excel at scooping ice cream.

I had a similar job scooping ice cream at a very busy shop while in college. Challenges included a persistent stressed muscle near my upper arm, which didn’t get better the more ice cream I scooped. There were customers who’d order one scoop, but ask me to make it “one really big scoop” because they didn’t want to pay the extra 50¢ for two scoops. And people paying for a $1.30 cone of ice cream with a hundred and thirty pennies, maybe with a few very thin dimes tossed in, which they’d line up on the stainless steel counter between us, which were nearly impossible to pick up with wet, sticky hands.

(You tell me if I was a brat by holding their ice cream cone in the other hand, while they cooled their heels waiting for me to pick up each individual coin, one-by-one, with the other – finally handing their cone over only after the last coin was pried off the counter and put in the register, which the owner monitored like a hawk. Another employee, if people were rude to her, would carefully balance – but not pack – the ice cream scoop delicately on top of the cone, so when they went outside to lick it, it would topple off. The moral of the story, as I often advise, is to be nice to people serving you food.)

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