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The Best Gooey Lemon Bar Recipe

This is my favorite lemon bar recipe! They’re made with a 3-ingredient buttery … Read more
The post The Best Gooey Lemon Bar Recipe appeared first on Sugar and Charm.

This is my favorite lemon bar recipe! They’re made with a 3-ingredient buttery ... Read more

The post The Best Gooey Lemon Bar Recipe appeared first on Sugar and Charm.


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chocolate raspberry pavlova stack

It’s been way too long since we had a showstopper of a dessert. When I look over the last four years of archives, it seems that practical, slightly boring and grownup things like salad and dinner have nudged out cooking purely for the pu…

It’s been way too long since we had a showstopper of a dessert. When I look over the last four years of archives, it seems that practical, slightly boring and grownup things like salad and dinner have nudged out cooking purely for the purpose of generating and distributing decadent joy. The Celebration Cake category looks like the land that time forgot. And so on this very snowy/slushy day, and the day before Valentine’s, no less, I’d like to recommend: Not a weeknight dinner.

chocolate raspberry pavlova stack-11

Here is a three-tiered chocolate pavlova, a crackly-edged, pillowy-centered meringue, with a few messy, wonderful things between and on top of it: raspberry curd, barely sweetened whipped cream, a drizzle of chocolate ganache, fresh raspberries, and a dusting of snow, almost as pretty as what’s out my window right now. There are corners you can cut if you wish: you could use a drizzle of storebought chocolate sauce, you could make a quicker raspberry dessert sauce instead of making the curd, but as the curd uses 6 egg yolks and the pavlova uses 6 whites, you might find the balance of ingredients when you make both as satisfying as I do. You could also revert to the single-layer chocolate pavlova in the archives, should you need less of everything.

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crispy potatoes with mushrooms

I like to think that I made a smashing impression on my Russian in-laws when I met them — at the time, I didn’t eat meat or, more importantly, smoked fish. I remain staunch in my dislike of beets. And shortly after we got married I…

I like to think that I made a smashing impression on my Russian in-laws when I met them — at the time, I didn’t eat meat or, more importantly, smoked fish. I remain staunch in my dislike of beets. And shortly after we got married I started talking about quitting my day job to… blog full time. But I took a liking to pickles immediately. I make a pretty solid eggplant caviar, because I learned from the best. I’ve since figured out Honey Cake and Russian Napoleon. And although the vegetarian options were limited at the time when we first met at the Russian Vodka Room, I quickly discovered my favorite Russian comfort food, fried potatoes and mushrooms (kartoshka s’gribami).

russian-style mushrooms and potatoes-collage

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french onion baked lentils and farro

This is clearly not a pasta bake, but it was supposed to be one. From November to December, I was pursued with a vision of an oozy, decadent french onion pasta bake — that is, the flavors of french onion soup applied to baked pasta with …

This is clearly not a pasta bake, but it was supposed to be one. From November to December, I was pursued with a vision of an oozy, decadent french onion pasta bake — that is, the flavors of french onion soup applied to baked pasta with a bronzed and broiled gruyere topping. What was not to love? How could it not be delicious? But it was never right. I made it a few times and I never wanted to eat it. It was too rich and didn’t have enough to bite into, even by the intended standard of holiday indulgence. In the last round, I added cauliflower to it so it felt like more of a pasta-and-vegetable bake and I liked it even less (damp? somehow).

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Breakfast Quiche

This breakfast quiche recipe is hearty and easy, starring a well-seasoned filling of hashbrowns and vegetables encased in pastry crust!…

A Couple Cooks – Recipes worth repeating.

This breakfast quiche recipe is hearty and easy, starring a well-seasoned filling of hashbrowns and vegetables encased in pastry crust!

Breakfast Quiche

Looking for a standout quiche recipe to make mornings more delicious? Try this easy Breakfast Quiche! We’ve become positive quiche experts over here, trying every different flavor. This one has come out on top! Hearty hashbrowns, bell peppers, and feta cheese for a perfectly-seasoned savory filling. Encase it all in a flaky pastry crust, and it’s simple to bake up as a make-ahead breakfast or fancy brunch. Here’s how to do it!

Ingredients in this breakfast quiche

A quiche is a French pastry filled with a custard and savory fillings. Many quiche recipes you can eat for breakfast, brunch, lunch or dinner, making them extremely versatile! You can also eat them warm or cold, making leftovers a great snack or simple dinner. This breakfast quiche we created with ease in mind: the ingredients are simple and evocative of a breakfast casserole. Here’s what you’ll need:

  • Quiche crust: 1 homemade recipe or refrigerated pie dough*
  • Eggs
  • Milk
  • Heavy cream
  • Dried mustard, dried oregano, garlic powder, salt and pepper
  • Cheddar cheese
  • Feta cheese
  • Frozen or refrigerated hashbrowns
  • Green onions
  • Red bell pepper
Breakfast quiche recipe

For the crust: purchased is quickest

The best way to make a quiche recipe is with homemade quiche crust! But with a breakfast quiche, you may want to learn towards purchased crust to make preparation simpler. For this recipe, we used a purchased crust! Here are the pros and cons to each method:

  • Homemade crust holds its shape better and tastes better.  This quiche crust tastes so much better than store-bought: it’s more buttery and flaky. It can also hold a crimped crust better.
  • Purchased crust is faster. Purchased crust works too: especially for this breakfast quiche. We’ve had some issues with refrigerated pie dough holding its shape in a crimped pattern. For refrigerated or frozen crusts, we recommend using the decoration where you press the fork tines into the crust (see the photos).
Breakfast quiche

Tips for blind baking

The biggest key to making this breakfast quiche? Blind bake the crust! This means you bake the pastry crust without the filling first to avoid a soggy bottom. This is essential with quiche because the filling is so liquid (but not required with say, apple pie which has a chunkier filling). Here’s how to blind bake a crust:

  • Prick holes with a fork all over the crust. This is called docking: it helps keep the crust from puffing up while in the oven without filling.
  • Add parchment paper then pie weights, dried beans, or rice! Pour them right into the crust. We use two sets of these pie weights. Bake for 12 minutes at 400°F, then reduce the heat to 350°F.
  • Remove the pie weights. Remove the weights and bake 20 to 25 more minutes until the crust is golden.

For the pie crust shield

For this breakfast quiche recipe, you’ll also need to use a pie crust shield. This prevents the pie crust from burning in the oven by covering just the crust, allowing the filling to bake uncovered. There are two options for a pie crust shield:

  • Make a pie crust shield with aluminum foil. Cut a hole in the center of a large sheet of foil that’s the diameter of your pie plate. The foil will rest on the crust, but allow the filling to bake uncovered. Here’s a video with instructions for more details.
  • Or, buy a metal pie crust shield. Here’s a link to buy a pie crust shield online.
Breakfast Quiche

Breakfast quiche filling ideas

There are lots of ways to make a breakfast quiche! This one is flavored similar to our hashbrown breakfast casserole. But you can swap in different seasonings or filling ingredients to your liking! Here are a few ideas and tips:

  • Don’t overfill the quiche. Try to keep the approximate volume of vegetables similar to the recipe below.
  • Try other sauteed vegetables like very small broccoli florets, mushrooms, or onions.
  • Add fresh vegetables like sundried tomatoes, finely diced bell pepper, or frozen and thawed spinach (with all liquid squeezed out).
  • Vary the cheese. Try adding smoked gouda or smoked mozzarella in place of the cheddar cheese, or add grated Parmesan.

More quiche recipes

Love a good quiche? Here are a few other recipes you might enjoy:

This breakfast quiche recipe is…

Vegetarian.

Print
Breakfast Quiche

Breakfast Quiche


  • Author: Sonja Overhiser
  • Prep Time: 45 minutes
  • Cook Time: 45 minutes
  • Total Time: 1 hour 30 minutes
  • Yield: 8

Description

This breakfast quiche recipe is hearty and easy, starring a well-seasoned filling of hashbrowns and vegetables encased in pastry crust!


Ingredients

  • 1 Homemade Quiche Crust (made through Step 4) or 1 refrigerated pie dough*
  • 4 large eggs
  • ¾ cup milk
  • ½ cup heavy cream
  • 1 teaspoon dried mustard
  • 1 teaspoon dried oregano
  • 1 teaspoon garlic powder
  • 1 teaspoon kosher salt
  • Fresh ground black pepper
  • ¾ cup shredded mild cheddar cheese
  • ¼ cup feta cheese crumbles
  • 1 cup (4 ounces) frozen or refrigerated hashbrowns
  • 2 green onions, sliced (white, light and dark green portions)
  • ¼ cup finely diced red pepper

Instructions

  1. Prepare the crust: If using Homemade Quiche Crust, prepare it in the pie pan using the steps in the linked recipe. If using refrigerated pie dough, transfer the dough to the pie pan (make sure it is standard and not deep dish). Fold the overhanging dough backwards and seal it to form a rim. With refrigerated crust, it’s easiest to press in the tines of the fork to decorate the edges (like in the photos; it’s harder to get the crimped edges to keep their shape while baking). Use a fork to gently prick holes in the bottom and sides of the crust (which helps it to not puff up while blind baking).
  2. Freeze the crust: Freeze the crust in the pan for 15 minutes.
  3. Preheat the oven: Preheat the oven to 400°F.
  4. Blind bake the crust at 400°F: Place a sheet of parchment paper on top of the crust. Fill the dough with pie weights (we used two sets of these), dry beans, or dry rice. Bake for 12 minutes.
  5. Reduce the oven temperature and blind bake at 350°F: Reduce the oven temperature to 350°F and carefully remove the parchment and weights. Bake 20 to 25 minutes until the bottom is lightly browned (or more if necessary for refrigerated pie crust). Remove from the oven and add the filling once it is ready.
  6. Make the filling: In a medium bowl, whisk together the eggs, milk, cream, dried mustard, dried oregano, garlic powder, kosher salt, and several grinds black pepper. Place the cheddar cheese in the bottom of the crust, then add the hashbrowns. Pour the egg mixture over the top. Sprinkle the top with green onions and diced red pepper. Add feta and another handful of shredded cheese. 
  7. Bake: Add a pie crust shield (purchased or homemade with foil**). Bake at 350°F for 40 to 50 minutes minutes, until the center is set and the top is lightly browned. Cool at least 30 minutes, then serve or refrigerate. Re-warm in a 200 degree oven for 20 minutes. (You can also serve it cold.) Leftovers stay for 5 days refrigerated.

Notes

*Typically we recommend a homemade quiche crust, but to keep this breakfast quiche simple we used purchased crust.

**To make your own crust shield, cut a hole in the center of a large sheet of foil that’s the diameter of your pie plate. The foil will rest on the crust but let the pie filling be uncovered. Here’s a video with instructions for more details

  • Category: Breakfast
  • Method: Baked
  • Cuisine: French inspired
  • Diet: Vegetarian

Keywords: Breakfast quiche, breakfast quiche recipe

A Couple Cooks - Recipes worth repeating.

brown butter brown sugar shortbread

Fifteen Decembers ago, I shared a recipe for one of the delicious cookies I’d ever made or eaten: brown butter brown sugar shorties. I told you that because they were impossibly flavorful (nutty brown butter, brown sugar, vanilla, you&#8…

Fifteen Decembers ago, I shared a recipe for one of the delicious cookies I’d ever made or eaten: brown butter brown sugar shorties. I told you that because they were impossibly flavorful (nutty brown butter, brown sugar, vanilla, you’re welcome) but not terribly cute (beige, sprinkle-free) you should feel free to keep them home from parties where their feelings could be hurt as they were ignored in favor of the frosted, baubled, and brightly colored popular kids. They’re too good to share, anyway.

brown butter brown sugar shortbread-01

But the recipe turned out to fail one crucial test: It doesn’t work for everyone. The problem is the brown butter. All butter has some water content; when we brown it, the water content evaporates off and the amount of butterfat and milk solids left behind is variable. When you’re making salted brown butter crispy treats or a wedding cake with brown butter vanilla cake layers, it doesn’t matter: these recipes are forgiving. When you make a shaped cookie, like a slice-and-bake or cookie cutter shape that has to be consistent for everyone, it does. There were so many comments about the cookies turning into a crumbly mess that I had to add a note of caution, warning you to proceed only with modest expectations.

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Salted Butter Chocolate Sauce

When it comes to baking and desserts, one doesn’t necessarily think of salt as a flavor. But more and more, I keep considering, and reconsidering, the role that salt plays in just about everything I bake. And because I keep both salted and unsalted butter on hand – I can’t imagine my morning toast without a little salted butter spread over the top – I’ll…

salted butter chocolate sauce recipe

When it comes to baking and desserts, one doesn’t necessarily think of salt as a flavor. But more and more, I keep considering, and reconsidering, the role that salt plays in just about everything I bake. And because I keep both salted and unsalted butter on hand – I can’t imagine my morning toast without a little salted butter spread over the top – I’ll sometimes reach for the salted variety when tackling a baking project or making dessert.

salted butter chocolate sauce

I wasn’t the first person to put salt on dessert; people from various cultures have been sprinkling salt on fresh fruit for ages. And many pastry chefs, as well as some big chocolate companies, have gotten in on the “salt in chocolate” act as well.

fleur de sel chocolate

But I’ve gotten so used to sprinkling it on sweets that sometimes if I’m having my last course in a restaurant and I think the dessert needs a little perking up, you’ll find me looking around the table for a little bowl of flaky sea salt. Salt is so important to me that I’ll sometimes carry a little wooden box of fleur de sel, which when I’d bring out in restaurants, my co-diners would give me a look as if I was being pretentious. (Then – of course – they’d ask if they could have a pinch too.)

Continue Reading Salted Butter Chocolate Sauce...

corn cacio e pepe

As the year is not 2017, when the cacio e pepe frenzy (outside of Rome, where it’s never not on the menu) seemed to have peak frenzy and when I put a cross between potatoes Anna and cacio e pepe on the cover of my second cookbook, I&#821…

As the year is not 2017, when the cacio e pepe frenzy (outside of Rome, where it’s never not on the menu) seemed to have peak frenzy and when I put a cross between potatoes Anna and cacio e pepe on the cover of my second cookbook, I’d only choose the dog days of summer 2023 to talk about cacio e pepe once again for a single reason: A worthy update. The only thing I love more than the combination of salty, funky pecorino cheese and copious amounts of black pepper kicking up sparks of heat on a tangle of linguine is the way I make it in the summer: adding sweet, crunchy corn. It is, full stop, the perfect complement to the punchy cheese sauce; they’re made for each other.

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raspberry streusel muffins

Once upon a time, I spent approximately a whole summer making blueberry muffins, gripped with an obsession (that would be worrisome anywhere but this page) to make what I hoped would be the last blueberry muffin recipe we’d ever need. Yo…

Once upon a time, I spent approximately a whole summer making blueberry muffins, gripped with an obsession (that would be worrisome anywhere but this page) to make what I hoped would be the last blueberry muffin recipe we’d ever need. You’d think after all that that the path to these raspberry muffins would be simpler, but it took five raspberry seasons to get here.

A very logical question you’re about to ask is: Why not just swap the blueberries in your blueberry muffins with raspberries? And the answer is that while it works; they’re not bad at all, they’re just not the raspberry muffin I dreamed of. These are and they’re utterly perfect: hefty, moist, lemony, not too sweet, and absolutely tie-dyed with a constellation of raspberries inside. I think they might be the best muffin I have ever made. Here’s what I’ve learned along the way:

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buffalo chicken cobb salad

Earlier this summer, I made what I thought was just a dinner salad that turned out to be my new favorite dinner salad of all time and it was literally all I could talk about for the next few weeks. Incessantly. Insufferably. I didn’t eve…

Earlier this summer, I made what I thought was just a dinner salad that turned out to be my new favorite dinner salad of all time and it was literally all I could talk about for the next few weeks. Incessantly. Insufferably. I didn’t even wait to ask if you’re into buffalo wings (of course you are), cobb salads (you could be, I can just tell) or looking for a dinner idea. It’s just not who I am.

Perhaps even less surprising was realizing I have very strong opinions about how to adapt the idea buffalo wings to things that are not buffalo wings, which means I’m about to break down my favorite parts of all this:

buffalo chicken cobb salad-4

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