soy-glazed chicken

It’s a gorgeous spring week in New York City, the windows are wide open, and before I find it impossible to resist the siren call of a full shift to picnic–summer-beach-fresh-everything mode (with some ice cream/pie/cookie breaks, …

It’s a gorgeous spring week in New York City, the windows are wide open, and before I find it impossible to resist the siren call of a full shift to picnicsummer-beach-fresh-everything mode (with some ice cream/pie/cookie breaks, naturally) I wanted to tell you about one last easy weeknight pandemic-era favorite: a soy sauce-basted chicken that my family would be happy if I made once a week forever.

I first made this in the early months, when all the restaurants were closed and we missed takeout*. I’ve made it almost monthly since then because it’s the fastest, easiest non-grilling way for me to turn a package of boneless, skinless chicken thighs or breasts into a meal that everyone actually finishes. Browning the chicken well gives it a slightly crisp edge, and reducing a mixture of garlic, ginger, soy sauce, rice vinegar, and brown sugar around it while the chicken finishes cooking gives it a lacquered effect.

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Pecan Crusted Salmon

This pecan crusted salmon is fast and easy, with a deliciously crunchy topping! Make it to impress on weeknights or for dinner guests. Here’s a meal that consistently makes everyone who takes a bite say Wow. Try this Pecan Crusted Salmon! It has an air of restaurant-style fancy, but it’s quick and easy to whip up on a weeknight. It takes basic salmon to the next level, coating it in a crunchy topping of nuts, seasoned breadcrumbs, and Parmesan cheese. The flavors are elevated enough for dinner guests, but also tasty enough for kids to shovel in bites. Pull it out for dinner guests or an easy weeknight meal…you choose! (And keep reading for a custom side dish that pairs beautifully.) What you’ll need for pecan crusted salmon Aside from the fish, all the other ingredients in this pecan crusted salmon are pantry ingredients! That makes this preparation great for if you’re looking for a great way to cook salmon but don’t want to think too hard. Once you’ve bought the Italian panko, you can keep it on hand for months. Here’s what you’ll need: Salmon (wild caught if possible, see below) Dijon mustard Honey Pecans Italian panko (see more below) Grated […]

A Couple Cooks – Healthy, Whole Food, & Vegetarian Recipes

This pecan crusted salmon is fast and easy, with a deliciously crunchy topping! Make it to impress on weeknights or for dinner guests.

Pecan Crusted Salmon

Here’s a meal that consistently makes everyone who takes a bite say Wow. Try this Pecan Crusted Salmon! It has an air of restaurant-style fancy, but it’s quick and easy to whip up on a weeknight. It takes basic salmon to the next level, coating it in a crunchy topping of nuts, seasoned breadcrumbs, and Parmesan cheese. The flavors are elevated enough for dinner guests, but also tasty enough for kids to shovel in bites. Pull it out for dinner guests or an easy weeknight meal…you choose! (And keep reading for a custom side dish that pairs beautifully.)

What you’ll need for pecan crusted salmon

Aside from the fish, all the other ingredients in this pecan crusted salmon are pantry ingredients! That makes this preparation great for if you’re looking for a great way to cook salmon but don’t want to think too hard. Once you’ve bought the Italian panko, you can keep it on hand for months. Here’s what you’ll need:

  • Salmon (wild caught if possible, see below)
  • Dijon mustard
  • Honey
  • Pecans
  • Italian panko (see more below)
  • Grated Parmesan cheese (that’s the kind that’s the texture of sand, not shredded)
  • Salt and pepper
Pecan crusted salmon

What salmon to look for

The number one most important part of a salmon recipe? The quality of the salmon. Try to find the best quality salmon you can afford. Here are a few tips on locating a great piece of salmon:

  • Buy wild caught salmon. Wild caught is the way to go! It’s most sustainable and has the best flavor.
  • Fresh salmon is best. You can find decent frozen salmon. But for the very best salmon, buy it fresh from your local seafood counter.
  • Coho is a good choice. We tend to like Coho salmon for its mild flavor: it’s a good middle of the road option in terms of price. Try to avoid Atlantic salmon as it is typically farmed salmon.

Italian style Panko, and a substitute

A key to this recipe? Italian-style Panko. Panko is a Japanese-style breadcrumb mixture that is airier and lighter than traditional breadcrumbs. Italian panko is panko with herbs and salt added. You can also use breadcrumbs or Italian breadcrumbs here, but we like how panko give it just the right crunch. You should be able to find panko easily at your local grocery store. If you can’t find the Italian-style panko, you can do the following:

  • Use regular panko and add salt and Italian seasonings. Mix the 2 tablespoons panko with 1 pinch kosher salt and 1/2 teaspoon Italian seasoning (or 1/4 teaspoon each dried oregano and dried basil)
  • Or look for Italian or plain breadcrumbs instead, or make your own breadcrumbs! For plain breadcrumbs, use the seasoning recommendations for panko above.
Pecan crusted salmon

Make it gluten-free

Panko is made from bread, so how to make this recipe gluten-free? Look for gluten-free panko or breadcrumbs in stores or online to make this a gluten free recipe. You can also omit the breadcrumbs, but keep in mind the topping will be less delightfully crunchy (but still delicious).

How to store pecans

Another key to this recipe: the pecans! The nuts are great for adding a bit of protein and crunch to the top of the salmon. We like to buy a nice big bag of pecans…but did you know it’s not best to store them in your pantry? Here’s how to keep them fresh longer:

  • Store pecans in the refrigerator for up to 6 months! Most people think of storing nuts in their pantry. But pecans stay freshest in your refrigerator! We place them in our cheese drawer.
  • Store pecans frozen for up to 2 years. Did you know you can freeze pecans? This extends the life for years. They thaw quickly when you remove them!
Arugula Goat Cheese Salad

A great side dish to pair with pecan crusted salmon!

For this pecan crusted salmon, we decided to create a custom side dish to go alongside! Readers often tell us it’s hard to find side dishes that are easy enough to make, fit with the vibe, and fill in the needed nutrients. Here’s one we developed to fit with this recipe: Arugula Goat Cheese Salad! Here’s more about it:

  • Start with a few handfuls baby arugula, fluffy leafy greens. Make sure to buy baby, not standard arugula (which is very bitter). You can also substitute spinach or mixed greens.
  • Drizzle it with this Creamy Balsamic Dressing, which has the best tangy sweet flavor.
  • Top with goat cheese crumbles, sliced shallot, apples, and pecans. It’s simple, but the flavors are tight and it tastes incredible.

Other side dishes to pair

Just a salad and pecan crusted salmon might need a little filling out as a full meal. So here are a few other quick side dishes to consider!

This pecan crusted salmon recipe is…

Pescatarian and gluten-free (with gluten-free panko).

Print
Pecan Crusted Salmon

Pecan Crusted Salmon


1 Star2 Stars3 Stars4 Stars5 Stars (5 votes, average: 5.00 out of 5)

  • Author: Sonja Overhiser
  • Prep Time: 10 minutes
  • Cook Time: 10 minutes
  • Total Time: 20 minutes
  • Yield: 4
  • Diet: Gluten Free

Description

This pecan crusted salmon is fast and easy, with a deliciously crunchy topping! Make it to impress on weeknights or for dinner guests.


Ingredients

  • 1 pound salmon fillet or fillets, skin on (wild caught if possible)
  • 3/4 teaspoon kosher salt
  • Fresh ground black pepper
  • 1 1/2 tablespoons Dijon mustard
  • 1 1/2 tablespoons honey or maple syrup
  • 1/4 cup finely chopped pecans
  • 2 tablespoons Italian panko (or Italian breadcrumbs; gluten-free if desired)*
  • 2 tablespoons grated Parmesan cheese

Instructions

  1. Preheat the oven to 425 degrees Fahrenheit. 
  2. Bring the salmon to room temperature and pat it dry. Season the salmon with the salt and pepper. In a small bowl, mix the Dijon mustard and honey, then brush it on to the fish in an even layer. 
  3. In another small bowl, mix together the finely chopped pecans, Italian panko, and Parmesan cheese. Sprinkle the pistachio mixture on top of the fish.
  4. Bake for 10 to 15 minutes until the salmon flakes with a fork; the internal temperature should be between 125 to 130 degrees Fahrenheit in the center. Serve immediately. 

Notes

*We recommend Italian panko or Italian breadcrumbs because they’re already seasoned. Panko is best since it’s the lightest and crunchiest. If all you can find is regular panko, mix 2 tablespoons panko with 1 pinch kosher salt and 1/2 teaspoon Italian seasoning (or 1/4 teaspoon each dried oregano and dried basil). 

  • Category: Main dish
  • Method: Baked
  • Cuisine: Seafood

Keywords: Pecan crusted salmon

A Couple Cooks - Healthy, Whole Food, & Vegetarian Recipes

rigatoni alla vodka

If you ever need evidence that I do not shy away from embarrassing myself here, look no further than one of the earliest posts on this site, where I tell the story of inviting a guy I’d recently begun dating over for dinner. I’d wa…

If you ever need evidence that I do not shy away from embarrassing myself here, look no further than one of the earliest posts on this site, where I tell the story of inviting a guy I’d recently begun dating over for dinner. I’d watched Rachel Ray’s 30-Minute Meals that morning, equally hungered by her making one of my favorite pastas, penne alla vodka, and horrified by the fact that she renamed it the “You Won’t Be Single For Long Vodka Cream Pasta.” I decided to make it, you know, tongue-in-cheek, sarcastically, sure Deb, except it “worked” — we are 15 years married (although everyone agrees the last year counts as two) which works out to about 17 years of repeating this awkwardness as part of our “how it started in the kitchen” story.

But when I look back at that recipe, do you know — after the name — what makes me cringe the most? Rachel Ray told me to put chicken broth in my vodka sauce! I shudder for me, and you. In the years since, she’s moved forward and so have I. I now know that well-seasoned pasta water is the only “broth” your sauce needs. I’ve made a few other changes to the way I make, too:

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baked feta with tomatoes and chickpeas

Listen, this will surprise nobody at all, but I am not trendy. I am deeply uncool and I prefer it this way. It puts expectations right where they belong — low; no, lower, please. But I am not immune to TikTok. I, um, love TikTok, it&#821…

Listen, this will surprise nobody at all, but I am not trendy. I am deeply uncool and I prefer it this way. It puts expectations right where they belong — low; no, lower, please. But I am not immune to TikTok. I, um, love TikTok, it’s my favorite time suck. Through it, I’ve learned so much about even more ways I can be uncool. Side parts! Laugh-cry emojis! It’s a whole thing. So is this baked feta, which is a spin on a baked pasta that’s been going viral the last few weeks. It began with a recipe developed by Finnish food blogger Jenni Häyrinen called “Uunifetapasta,” which translates to oven-baked feta pasta. It’s an older recipe (2019 is “old” in TikTok) but it caught on again because tomatoes and feta are timeless. I like that it uses cherry tomatoes, which are obviously not as great in the winter as they are in the summer, but are surprisingly good year-round when roasted. You’ll see.

what you'll needready to bake

Now please don’t get upset, we all have our things, I just don’t really love feta with pasta, unless it’s a pasta salad, or sometimes orzo. I think it’s absolutely perfect, however, with beans, especially chickpeas, which hold up well to this heartier preparation. As a person who is always in need of lunch inspiration that’s not whatever my kids didn’t finish, this was perfect for yesterday, a day I grabbed the ingredients in the morning — our grocery store was suspiciously low on feta and cherry tomatoes I’m absolutely here for it — and we scooped it throughout the afternoon onto focaccia (this, halved and baked thin in a 9×13-inch pan), so grateful for the fresh idea.

baked feta with tomatoes and chickpeasbaked feta with tomatoes and chickpeas

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Pasta e Fagioli

This rustic Italian pasta-and-bean soup is oh-so-satisfying on a cold day (but just as enjoyable on a warm one). Pasta e fagioli is an Italian pasta and bean stew with a tomato-based broth, small pasta, and white beans such as cannellini. It’s one of our favorite quick and easy dinner recipes, made with mostly pantry […]

The post Pasta e Fagioli first appeared on Love and Olive Oil.

This rustic Italian pasta-and-bean soup is oh-so-satisfying on a cold day (but just as enjoyable on a warm one).

Pasta e fagioli is an Italian pasta and bean stew with a tomato-based broth, small pasta, and white beans such as cannellini. It’s one of our favorite quick and easy dinner recipes, made with mostly pantry ingredients you already have on hand.

White bowl with Pasta e Fagioli, topped with parmesan shavings and fresh parsley

When the stars make you drool, just like pasta fazool, that’s amore.

And in truth, this soup is most definitely a thing of true love.

Pasta e fagioli, or pasta and beans, is an Italian peasant soup made with (you guessed it) pasta and white beans. In the United States it is often called pasta fazool, like the song, fazool derived from the Neapolitan word for beans, fasule.

Whatever you call it, there’s no denying it is incredibly hearty and delicious.

Blue Dutch Oven with Pasta e Fagioli soup and silver ladle

The variations of such a dish are myriad, some more soupy, some more saucy, some with nary a tomato in sight.

I imagine Italian grannies everywhere each have their own signature version, with the only common thread between them being the presence of pasta and beans in some form or another.

Our version is most definitely a tomato-centric soup, hearty and flavorful with the addition of Italian sausage and fresh fennel. We also like to mash some of the beans, which add a lovely thickness and silky texture to the broth.

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Steak Street Tacos with Chipotle Lime Coleslaw

Here’s a satisfying street taco recipe that comes together in a flash. It’s topped with a tangy chipotle-lime coleslaw that provides flavor, spice and crunch to these satisfyingly savory street tacos. When Aristotle said the whole is greater than the sum of the parts, he was talking about tacos, right? Because these tacos are made […]

Here’s a satisfying street taco recipe that comes together in a flash. It’s topped with a tangy chipotle-lime coleslaw that provides flavor, spice and crunch to these satisfyingly savory street tacos.

When Aristotle said the whole is greater than the sum of the parts, he was talking about tacos, right? Because these tacos are made up of some seriously good parts: thin slices of savory seared steak, toasted flour tortillas, a tangy chipotle-lime slaw, and a sprinkle of pickled jalapeños and fresh cilantro.

Four steak street tacos on a black rectangular plate, with limes, pickled jalapenos and chipotle slaw

The perfect taco hits all the right notes, combining spicy and sweet, soft and crunchy, salty and tangy.

And these steak street tacos do just that, with thin slices of steak browned to perfection, and topped with a bright and crunchy slaw made with a mix of Duke’s Mayonnaise, smoky chipotle, and fresh squeezed lime juice.

Closeup of the filling of a steak street taco, topped with micro cilantro leaves and pickled jalapenos

What makes it a street taco and not just a regular taco? The size, essentially.

Street tacos are generally smaller, about 4-5″ in diameter versus a more typical 6″ corn tortilla or 8″ flour tortilla. The handheld size makes them easy to eat standing in the street. We’ve found both corn and flour tortillas labeled ‘street taco size’ recently, and although we opted to use flour here, you could really use either.

Even better… warm the tortillas in the same skillet with all the flavorful fat and brown bits leftover from cooking the steak. Inspired in part by a drool-worthy binge-watch of the Taco Chronicles series (which I highly recommend checking out), specifically the episode on Suadero tacos. This particular kind of taco is made with seasoned beef cooked long and slow in a bath of its own fat (beef confit, essentially); the tortillas are also drenched in fat and toasted prior to being loaded up with the juicy, flavorful meat and simple toppings.

While our steak tacos are not even close to authentic Suadero tacos (the thin slices of steak cook in mere minutes, rather than slow cooking for hours as is traditional), we were certainly inspired by the preparation and especially the brilliant step of fat-soaking the tortillas.

Since we can’t exactly travel to Mexico right now to enjoy the real thing, this will have to do.

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skillet turkey chili

Right around the time quarantine cookies and tacos became a habit this spring, I also realized that that none of my existing chili recipes exactly fit the bill of what I wanted for dinner — namely, to focus on ground turkey, have a minim…

Right around the time quarantine cookies and tacos became a habit this spring, I also realized that that none of my existing chili recipes exactly fit the bill of what I wanted for dinner — namely, to focus on ground turkey, have a minimized ingredient list, and not take terribly long because it turns out that even with all day, every day at home, I just don’t have enough time to plan ahead for dinner and please don’t try to use reason or psychology to suggest there are other forces at play, okay?

what you'll need (cornbread optional, but not for us)

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Orecchiette with Bacon and Wilted Frisée

This easy weeknight pasta recipe will satisfy all your senses: with chunky bits of bacon and delicate wilted frisée and a mountain of freshly shredded Pecorino cheese. Quick and easy is the name of the game with this orecchiette pasta dish. It’s satisfying and flavorful, and even manages to get some greens in there in […]

This easy weeknight pasta recipe will satisfy all your senses: with chunky bits of bacon and delicate wilted frisée and a mountain of freshly shredded Pecorino cheese.

Quick and easy is the name of the game with this orecchiette pasta dish. It’s satisfying and flavorful, and even manages to get some greens in there in a surprisingly delicious way.

Bowl of orecchiette on a vintage wood board with a silver fork

Much like escarole, frisée is a unique, sturdy green that’s a bit too bitter to really enjoy as part of a salad. For me at least!

And other than soup, pastas are our favorite way to handle these slightly-bitter greens; in this case, slightly wilted and coated in bacon-y goodness which really does wonders to allay the bitterness.

Overhead, bowl of pasta with bacon and wilted frisee on a wooden board with pepper flakes and pecorino cheese

We first made this pasta months ago; I even shot it and wrote up a draft, but never published it because something just wasn’t quite right. Turns out, it was the pasta shape that was the problem. We originally used bucatini, which is one of our all-time favorite pasta shapes, but when used in this recipe it makes it really hard to get a nice ‘bite’ that includes all the goods in a single forkful. All the bits and toppings tend to settle in the bottom of your bowl.

That’s where orecchiette is so perfect: the little pasta ‘ears’ basically serve as scoops for the good stuff.

Anyone else reminded of those little rubber poppers you’d get from the quarter machines? You know, the ones you’d flip inside out, set on the table then hold your breath until they went flying? Just me?

Also: I will never spell orecchiette right on the first try. Heck, I can barely spell it right on the second, I usually end up having to google it and copy the spelling from there. It’s even worse than mozzarella or prosciutto!

Orecchiette: impossible to spell, effortless to eat.

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Egg Salad Sandwiches with Roasted Beet

Say hello to your new favorite sandwich: creamy egg salad seasoned with paprika, thin slices of roasted beet, and a generous handful of spicy microgreens to perfectly offset the richness of the egg. Taylor’s classic egg salad is simple and satisfying, with only 4 ingredients (eggs included), plus salt and pepper. It’s not overly mayo-heavy […]

Say hello to your new favorite sandwich: creamy egg salad seasoned with paprika, thin slices of roasted beet, and a generous handful of spicy microgreens to perfectly offset the richness of the egg.

Taylor’s classic egg salad is simple and satisfying, with only 4 ingredients (eggs included), plus salt and pepper. It’s not overly mayo-heavy or mustard-forward, with a very simple flavor profile that let you actually taste the egg (not overwhelmed by dill or relish or other add-ins). A pinch of sweet paprika gives the egg salad a well-rounded flavor and ever so slightly pink hue (something that pairs perfectly with the rich ruby red of the beets).

Egg salad sandwich cut in half, showing the layers of beet and egg

Lunch is often a struggle around these parts.

We try to plan our dinners to include leftovers (let’s just say we’re masters at cooking for 4 for this reason), but sometimes we find ourselves floundering in the kitchen at noon, hangry and without a solid plan for lunch.

It’s days like these that egg salad sandwiches have become our go-to. Don’t ask me where the idea for the beet came from, I just know I came downstairs one day to find Taylor had thrown this together and I fell in love all over again. Something about the sweet, earthiness of the beet goes so well with the creamy egg salad.

Assuming we have some roasted beets in the fridge (I fully admit we’ve been buying packaged pre-roasted beets and I’m not ashamed about it), these sandwiches come together in about 20 minutes, including the time it takes to boil, cool, and peel the eggs. Hard-boil a few eggs ahead of time and it’d be even quicker.

Egg salad sandwich with roasted beets and microgreens

While this small-batch egg salad recipe could be used in a variety of ways, our favorite assemblage includes thin slices of roasted red beet, a thick layer of creamy egg salad, and a pile of spicy microgreens (arugula or watercress would also be great here too!)

The creaminess of the egg, the earthiness of the beet, and the spiciness of the greens all come together on slices of thick brioche sandwich bread to make what I consider the perfect sandwich.

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Skillet Mexican Zucchini

Skillet Mexican Zucchini is incredibly delicious with a little bit of a kick from the jalapeño topped with melted queso blanco. So easy and quick, a must try! Mexican Zucchini I can’t get enough of zucchini in the summer, in fact I have an entire section of Zucchini Recipes in my index if you need […]

The post Skillet Mexican Zucchini appeared first on Skinnytaste.

Skillet Mexican Zucchini is incredibly delicious with a little bit of a kick from the jalapeño topped with melted queso blanco. So easy and quick, a must try!

This zucchini is incredibly delicious with a little bit of a Mexican kick from the jalapeno then topped with melted queso blanco. It's also easy and quick, a must try!
Mexican Zucchini

I can’t get enough of zucchini in the summer, in fact I have an entire section of Zucchini Recipes in my index if you need more ideas.

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The post Skillet Mexican Zucchini appeared first on Skinnytaste.