Honey Wheat Bread

This homemade Honey Wheat Bread is soft, fluffy, flavorful, and perfect for breakfast toast and all of your favorite sandwiches.

The post Honey Wheat Bread appeared first on Budget Bytes.

Grocery prices just keep rising and we’re all feeling it, so I decided to revisit some of my old bread recipes. Because if there ever was a time to learn how to make homemade bread, it’s now! It only takes a couple of dollars to make this super delish homemade honey wheat bread that is soft, fluffy, flavorful, and perfect for toast or sandwiches. And while it does take some time to make a loaf of bread, most of that is hands-off time that you can use to tend to other business. ;)

Front view of a loaf of honey wheat bread sliced.

What’s in Honey Wheat Bread?

This recipe starts with the basic yeast bread ingredients: flour, salt, and yeast. Then I added a little honey to give the bread just a hint of sweetness and a little olive oil which helps keep the bread (and the crust in particular) nice and soft. I’ve used a combination of whole wheat and all-purpose flour for this bread to keep the texture light and fluffy.

Can I use All Whole Wheat Flour?

While you can make bread with 100% whole wheat flour instead of a mix of white and wheat, that tends to produce heavier, dense bread. Whole wheat flour absorbs more moisture than all-purpose flour, so you may need to adjust the ratios in this bread slightly. I find that for the best texture, a 50/50 mix of whole wheat flour and all-purpose flour produces the best results.

How to Store Homemade Bread

It’s very important to let homemade bread cool completely to room temperature before storing to prevent trapping steam and creating condensation. Homemade bread doesn’t contain preservatives like store-bought bread, so you’ll need to either consume the bread quickly or freeze it for longer storage.

If storing your bread at room temperature, wrap the bread in cloth or paper to allow just enough airflow to prevent moisture build-up. Homemade bread will last about 2-3 days stored at room temperature.

If storing in the refrigerator, keep the bread in an air-tight container. This is my preferred method because I don’t usually eat bread that quickly. Bread stored in the refrigerator will stay good for about 5-6 days.

If you need to store your bread for longer, freeze it. I suggest slicing the bread prior to freezing so you can thaw or use 1-2 slices at a time as needed without thawing the entire loaf. I often toast my slices straight from the freezer for convenience! Make sure to freeze the bread in an air-tight, heavy-duty, freezer-safe container (like a freezer bag).

Overhead view of butter being spread on slices of wheat bread.
Overhead view of butter being spread on slices of wheat bread.
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Honey Wheat Bread

This homemade Honey Wheat Bread is soft, fluffy, flavorful, and perfect for breakfast toast and all of your favorite sandwiches.
Course Breakfast, Lunch
Cuisine American
Total Cost $2.20 recipe / $0.12 slice
Prep Time 2 hours 30 minutes
Cook Time 30 minutes
Total Time 3 hours
Servings 12 slices
Calories 156kcal

Ingredients

  • 1.25 cup warm water $0
  • 2 tsp active dry yeast or instant yeast $0.34
  • 2 Tbsp honey $0.50
  • 3 Tbsp olive oil $0.36
  • 1.5 cups whole wheat flour* $0.57
  • 1.5 cups all-purpose flour* $0.38
  • 1/2 Tbsp salt $0.05

Instructions

  • Stir the yeast and 1 Tbsp of the honey into the warm water until dissolved, then set it aside for about five minutes to allow the yeast to activate. A thick layer of foam should develop on the surface of the water.
  • While waiting for the yeast to bloom, stir together 1 cup of the whole wheat flour with the salt.
  • Once the yeast is foamy, add the rest of the honey (1 Tbsp) and the olive oil and stir to combine. Pour the yeast water into the bowl with the flour and salt, then stir until combined. Add ½ cup more of whole wheat flour and stir until combined again.
  • Now start adding all-purpose flour, ½ cup at a time, until you can no longer stir the dough with a spoon. At that point, turn the dough out onto a floured surface and begin to knead all-purpose flour into the dough, a little at a time.
  • Knead the dough for about five minutes, slowly adding flour as you knead, or until the dough no longer sticks to your hands, but is still fairly pliable. I used 1.5 cups all-purpose flour total, but the total flour amount will vary with the type of flour used and relative humidity in the room.
  • Place the kneaded dough back into the mixing bowl and cover with a cloth. Let the dough rise at room temperature for about an hour, or until it has doubled in size.
  • Lightly coat a bread pan with oil. Punch the dough down to deflate, then take the dough out of the bowl. Shape the dough into a log about the same length of your bread pan.
  • Place the shaped dough in the bread pan and let it rise for anohter hour, or until it has risen about 2-inches above the edges of the bread pan.
  • Preheat the oven to 375ºF. Once fully preheated, add the risen bread and bake for 30 minutes, or until the bread is deeply golden brown and it sounds hollow when tapped.
  • Remove the bread from the oven and let it cool just a few minutes (to make it easier to handle), then carefully remove the bread from the pan to fully cool.
  • Once cool, slice and serve your delicious homemade bread!

See how we calculate recipe costs here.

Notes

*The total amount of flour needed may vary depending on the brand of flour used and relative humidity. 
The crust of this bread will be quite firm when it comes out of the oven, but it does soften up considerably as the bread cools.

Nutrition

Serving: 1slice | Calories: 156kcal | Carbohydrates: 26g | Protein: 4g | Fat: 4g | Sodium: 294mg | Fiber: 3g
Sliced loaf of whole wheat bread viewed from the side.

How to Make Honey Wheat Bread – Step By Step Photos

Proofed yeast in a glass measuring cup.

Start by dissolving 1 Tbsp honey and 2 tsp instant yeast or active dry yeast in 1.25 cups of warm water. Set the mixture aside to allow the yeast to bloom. It should develop a thick layer of foam on the surface.

Flour and salt in a large mixing bowl.

While waiting for the yeast to bloom, add 1 cup whole wheat flour to a bowl with ½ Tbsp salt and stir to combine.

Yeast water being added to the flour mixture.

Once the yeast has bloomed, stir another 1 Tbsp honey and 3 Tbsp olive oil into the yeast water, then pour that mixture into the bowl with the flour and salt. Stir to combine.

More whole wheat flour being added to the dough.

Stir another ½ cup of whole wheat flour into the dough.

all purpose flour being stirred into the dough.

Now start adding in all-purpose flour, ½ cup at a time until you can no longer stir the dough with a spoon.

Shaggy dough ball in the mixing bowl.

When a shaggy ball of dough forms that can no longer be stirred with a spoon, it’s time to turn the dough out onto a floured surface to knead.

Dough being kneaded with a measuring cup of flour on the side.

Begin kneading in more all-purpose flour a little at a time. Knead for about five minutes, or until the dough no longer sticks to your hands, but is still pliable. I used about 1.5 cups all-purpose flour in total, but the total flour amount can vary depending on the type of flour used and the relative humidity in the room.

Kneaded dough in the mixing bowl half covered with a cloth.

Place the kneaded dough back into the mixing bowl and cover it with a towel. Let the dough rise at room temperature for one hour, or until doubled in size.

Dough being punched down.

Once doubled in size, punch the dough down to deflate. Remove the dough from the bowl and shape it into a log the same length as your bread pan.

Dough in a glass bread pan.

Lightly coat a bread pan with olive oil then place the shaped dough inside. Let the bread rise for another hour, or until it has risen about two inches above the top of the bread pan.

Risen bread in the bread pan.

Preheat the oven to 375ºF. Once the bread has risen, transfer the bread to the oven and bake for 30 minutes, or until the crust is deeply brown and sounds hollow when tapped.

Bread removed from the bread pan after baking.

After 30 minutes, remove the bread from the oven. Let it cool for just a few minutes to make it easier to handle, then carefully remove it from the bread pan to finish cooling.

Overhead view of sliced honey wheat bread.

Once cooled, slice and serve the bread, or store it for later!

Overhead view of butter being spread on slices of bread.

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Stromboli

Stromboli is a fun way to change up pizza night. Fill, roll, bake, then slice your pizza for the perfect finger food or appetizer!

The post Stromboli appeared first on Budget Bytes.

What’s better than pizza? Pizza in a different shape! 😆 Okay, so stromboli isn’t exactly like pizza, but it’s definitely in the pizza family. It’s like a sauce-less pizza rolled up into a delicious sliceable roll… and I have to admit, the roll makes it really fun to eat. You can eat it plain (like I do) or dip each slice into sauce. It’s a great party appetizer or something to snack on for movie night!

Overhead view of slices of stromboli next to a bowl of pizza sauce.

What’s In Stromboli

Traditionally, stromboli would be filled with a variety of cheese, cured meat like salami, and maybe some vegetables, but really it’s up to you! I say go for whatever toppings you like to add to your pizza. Just try to avoid anything super watery, like fresh tomatoes.

I used pepperoni, sautéed mushrooms, provolone, and mozzarella in my stromboli, but here are some other great ingredients to add to stromboli:

  • Olives
  • Banana peppers
  • Sun-dried tomatoes
  • Crumbled bacon
  • Onions

Keep it in Budget

To keep the cost of your stromboli in check, try making your own pizza dough and homemade pizza sauce for dipping! If you don’t have time to make your own dough, a store-bought pizza dough will also work.

Keep a close eye on the price of your filling ingredients, making sure to use a light hand with higher-priced items like meat and cheese. A little bit often goes a long way with those higher-priced items!

What to Serve with Stromboli

Stromboli is a bit heavy with all that meat and cheese, so make sure to lighten up your plate with a simple side salad, or if you’re feeling ambitious, go all out with an Antipasto Salad. You can even use some of the ingredients in the Antipasto inside of your stromboli!

A hand taking one slice of stromboli from the roll.
Overhead view of slices of stromboli around a bowl of pizza sauce.
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Stromboli

Stromboli is a fun way to change up pizza night. Fill, roll, bake, then slice your pizza for the perfect finger food or appetizer!
Course Appetizer, Main Course, Snack
Cuisine American
Total Cost $6.62 recipe / $0.66 serving
Prep Time 35 minutes
Cook Time 25 minutes
Total Time 1 hour
Servings 10 slices
Calories 237kcal
Author Beth – Budget Bytes

Ingredients

  • 8 oz. mushrooms, sliced $1.69
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced $0.16
  • 1 Tbsp butter $0.11
  • 1 pinch salt and pepper $0.05
  • 1 large pizza dough* $0.62
  • 6 slices provolone $1.50
  • 2 oz. pepperoni slices $1.00
  • 1 cup shredded mozzarella $1.00

Seasoned Oil Topping (optional)

  • 1.5 Tbsp olive oil $0.24
  • 1.5 Tbsp grated Parmesan $0.17
  • 1/2 tsp Italian seasoning $0.05
  • 1/4 tsp garlic powder $0.03

Instructions

  • Preheat the oven to 400ºF. Slice the mushrooms and mince the garlic.
  • Add the mushrooms, butter, and a pinch of salt and pepper to a skillet. Sauté the mushrooms over medium heat until they begin to release their water. Add the minced garlic and continue to sauté until all of the liquid in the skillet has evaporated. Remove the skillet from the heat.
  • Roll the pizza dough out to a 10×14 inch rectangle. Top the pizza dough with the sliced provolone, sautéed mushrooms, pepperoni, and mozzarella, leaving about an inch of space around three of the edges and 2-3 inches on one long side.
  • Roll the dough up starting on one long side rolling toward the opposite long side. After rolling, keep the seam side down and tuck the ends under to keep the sides closed. Transfer the rolled stromboli to a parchment-lined baking sheet.
  • In a small bowl, stir together the olive oil, Parmesan, Italian seasoning and garlic powder. Pour the mixture over the stromboli, then spread it to cover the surface. Use a sharp knife to cut slits in the top of the stromboli about an inch apart.
  • Bake the stromboli for about 25 minutes, or until well browned and the cheese is bubbling through the slits.
  • Let the stromboli cool slightly before slicing and serving!

See how we calculate recipe costs here.

Notes

*You can use homemade pizza dough or store bought.

Nutrition

Serving: 1slice | Calories: 237kcal | Carbohydrates: 20g | Protein: 10g | Fat: 13g | Sodium: 553mg | Fiber: 1g
Side view of stromboli slices on a cutting board.

How to Make Stromboli – Step By Step Photos

Sliced mushrooms in a skillet with butter.

Preheat the oven to 400ºF. Slice 8 oz. mushrooms, then add them to a skillet with 1 Tbsp butter and a pinch of salt and pepper.

Sautéed mushrooms in the skillet.

Sauté the mushrooms over medium heat until they begin to release their water. Add the minced garlic and continue to sauté until all of the liquid in the skillet has evaporated from the skillet.

Pizza dough rolled out into a rectangle.

Roll one large pizza dough out into a rectangle about 10×14 inches.

Provolone and mushrooms on pizza dough.

Top the dough with sliced provolone (I used six slices) and the sautéed mushrooms. You’ll want to leave about one inch around three of the sides, and slightly more room on one of the long sides. That will be the last side to roll so you’ll need some extra empty space to keep it closed.

Pepperoni and mozzarella on pizza dough.

Add any remaining toppings. I added about 2oz. pepperoni and one cup shredded mozzarella, again, staying about one inch away from the edges.

Stromboli being rolled up.

Begin to roll the stromboli, starting on one of the long edges and rolling toward the edge that had extra empty space. Make sure the seam is facing down when you finish rolling. Tuck both ends of the roll under to keep the ends closed.

Seasoned oil mixture in a bowl.

Make the seasoned oil for topping the stromboli by stirring together 1.5 Tbsp olive oil, 1.5 Tbsp grated Parmesan, ½ tsp Italian seasoning, and ¼ tsp garlic powder.

Stromboli on a baking sheet seasoned and sliced.

Place the rolled stromboli on a parchment-lined baking sheet with the seam sides down. Pour the seasoned oil over top then spread it over the surface of the stromboli. Use a sharp knife to slice some slits in the top of the stromboli, about an inch apart. This is where you’ll cut it into slices after baking.

Baked stromboli on the baking sheet.

Bake the stromboli in the preheated 400ºF oven for about 25 minutes or until it’s well browned on the surface and cheese is bubbling through the slits.

Sliced stromboli on a wooden cutting board, viewed from above.

Let the stromboli cool until it can be easily handled, then slice and serve!

A slice of stromboli being dipped into a bowl of pizza sauce.

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“Everything But the Bagel” Sandwich Rounds

These easy Sandwich Rounds are made with a simple no-knead dough and topped with a healthy dose of “everything but the bagel” seasoning!

The post “Everything But the Bagel” Sandwich Rounds appeared first on Budget Bytes.

I know these Sandwich Rounds may look kind of like bagels, but they’re not. They’re no-knead focaccia in an “Everything But The Bagel” disguise! That’s right, it’s my same no-knead focaccia dough in a convenient single-serving round shape and topped with a delicious dose of Everything But The Bagel seasoning. Perfect for building epic homemade sandwiches and WAY easier than making actual bagels!

EBTB Sandwich Rounds on a cooling rack with tongs next to a bowl of seasoning

What is Everything But the Bagel Seasoning?

“Everything but the bagel” seasoning is that same chunky mix of dried onion, garlic, salt, sesame seeds, and poppy seeds that you find on top of an “everything” flavored bagel. This seasoning is super delish and adds tons of flavor and texture wherever it’s sprinkled! It was popularized by Trader Joe’s a few years back and can now be found in just about every grocery store (I got mine at ALDI). But if you can’t find it at your local store, here’s a recipe for homemade Everything Bagel Seasoning from Two Peas & Their Pod.

What is the Texture of This Bread?

Since this is made with the same dough as my No-Knead Focaccia, it’s definitely a more “sturdy” bread. If you’re into soft white bread, this isn’t the recipe for you. This bread is for those that like bread that can stand up to their sandwich toppings without getting soggy. A bread that can handle being doused in Italian dressing. These sandwich rounds won’t bow under pressure!

Can I Use Whole Wheat Flour?

I’ve had success making my no-knead focaccia with up to ½ of the all-purpose flour replaced with whole wheat, but when you go beyond that the bread does tend to get really dense. Even with ½ whole wheat you’re probably going to need to increase the water a bit, as whole wheat flour tends to absorb more moisture.

These Sandwich Rounds Are Freezer Friendly

One of the best parts about making your own bread is that you can keep in the freezer and have fresh, homemade bread on hand all the time. To store your sandwich rounds in the freezer, make sure to let them cool to room temperature first. Then transfer them to a gallon-sized freezer bag and place them in the freezer. They’ll be good for about three months. To thaw, either let them sit at room temperature for 10-15 minutes, or microwave for about 30 seconds. Otherwise, they’ll be good in the fridge for about 3-4 days (air-tight container).

A sandwich made with the EBTB Sandwich round next to the rest of the batch on a cooling rack
EBTB Sandwich Rounds on a cooling rack with tongs

“Everything But the Bagel” Sandwich Rounds

These easy Sandwich Rounds are made with a simple no-knead dough and topped with a healthy dose of “everything but the bagel” seasoning.
Total Cost $1.54 recipe / $0.26 each
Prep Time 2 hours 30 minutes
Cook Time 25 minutes
Total Time 2 hours 55 minutes
Servings 6
Calories 179kcal
Author Beth – Budget Bytes

Ingredients

  • 2 cups all-purpose flour (plus some for dusting) $0.30
  • 3/4 tsp salt $0.03
  • 1 tsp instant yeast (or bread machine yeast) $0.45
  • 1.25 cups water $0.00
  • 1 Tbsp olive oil $0.16
  • 2 Tbsp Everything But The Bagel Seasoning $0.60

Instructions

  • Combine the flour, salt, and yeast in a bowl and stir until very well combined.
  • Add the water and olive oil and stir until a sticky ball of dough forms. There should be no dry flour left on the bottom of the bowl.
  • Loosley cover the bowl and let it sit at room temperature for two hours, or until the dough has doubled in size and is very fluffy and bubbly in texture.
  • Sprinkle some flour on top of the dough and use your hands to scrape it down off the sides of the bowl. Dump the dough out onto a floured surface. The dough will be very loose and sticky, so use flour to keep it from sticking to your hands and work surface.
  • Divide the dough into six pieces, then shape each into a ball. Use a rolling pin to flatten each ball into a 4 to 5-inch diameter circle. Place the flattened circles on a parchment lined baking sheet.
  • Brush a thin layer of water on top of each round, then sprinkle about one teaspoon of Everything But the Bagel Seasoning onto each one. Let the sandwich rounds rise for 30 minutes.
  • Toward the end of the rise time, begin preheating the oven to 400ºF. Use your fingers to press dimples down into each sandwich round (this helps them stay flat as they bake).
  • Once the oven is fully preheated, transfer the baking sheet to the oven and bake the sandwich rounds for about 25 minutes, or until they're golden brown.
  • Remove them from the oven and transfer to a wire rack to cool. The crust may seem really hard immediately after they come out of the oven, but they will soften as they cool. Once cooled serve or store in the refrigerator (3-4 days) or freezer (3 months), in an air-tight container.

Nutrition

Serving: 1sandwich round | Calories: 179kcal | Carbohydrates: 33g | Protein: 5g | Fat: 3g | Sodium: 558mg | Fiber: 2g
Side view of a sandwich made on an EBTB Sandwich Round

How to Make EBTB Sandwich Rounds – Step by Step Photos

Dry ingredients for sandwich rounds in a bowl

Stir together 2 cups of all-purpose flour with 1 tsp instant yeast (or bread machine yeast) and ¾ tsp salt. Make sure they’re very well combined.

Water being poured into the bowl of flour

Add 1.25 cups water and 1 Tbsp olive oil.

Sticky bread dough in the bowl

Stir until it forms a sticky ball of dough. There should be no dry flour left on the bottom of the bowl. Loosely cover the dough and let it rise at room temperature for two hours.

Risen dough being scraped from the sides of the bowl

After two hours the dough should have doubled in size and should be very fluffy and bubbly in texture. Sprinkle some flour on top to keep it from sticking (because it WILL be sticky), then use your hands to scrape it off the sides of the bowl.

Dough divided into six pieces

Turn the dough out onto a floured surface and divide it into six pieces.

Rolled out dough rounds

Use flour as needed to keep the dough from sticking. Shape each piece into a ball, then use a rolling pin to roll it into a flattened circle about 4 to 5-inches in diameter.

Water being brushed on top of the sandwich rounds

Place the flattened rounds onto a parchment-lined baking sheet. Brush a thin layer of water on top of each one (this helps the seasoning stick).

Seasoning being sprinkled on top of sandwich rounds

Sprinkle about one teaspoon of Everything But the Bagel Seasoning on top of each round. Let the rounds rise at room temperature for 30 minutes.

Risen sandwich rounds

Toward the end of the rise time, begin preheating the oven to 400ºF. Once risen, use your fingers to press dimples into the sandwich rounds. This helps them stay flat as they bake.

Baked sandwich rounds

Bake the sandwich rounds in the fully preheated oven for about 25 minutes, or until golden brown.

A stack of EBTB sandwich rounds on a cooling rack

Transfer the sandwich rounds to a cooling rack to cool until room temperature, then serve or save for later! Once cooled, I keep mine in an air-tight container either in the refrigerator for a few days, or in the freezer for up to about 3 months.

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