Will Someone Please Just Tell Me WTF to Put in My Coffee?

Recently, Twitter users turned against oat milk (proving that you really never know who will be canceled next!). Citing an almost year-old deep-dive specifically calling out the popular brand Oatly, this article calls oat milk the “new Coke,” stating t…

Recently, Twitter users turned against oat milk (proving that you really never know who will be canceled next!). Citing an almost year-old deep-dive specifically calling out the popular brand Oatly, this article calls oat milk the “new Coke,” stating the company masquerades as a so-called healthy alternative to dairy (and other nondairy) milks, but is essentially sugar water cut with oil, and a “bad” choice when it comes to creamy beverages.

The article compares Oatly’s marketing strategy—its splashiest slogan being “it’s like milk but made for humans”—to Sugar Association ads from the 1970s (“only 18 calories per teaspoon, and it’s all energy”); 1930s cigarette brands (“give your throat a break”); and Coca-Cola’s 2009 “open happiness” campaign, the article launches into a very spooky breakdown of the science behind the oat milk. Essentially, during Oatly’s oat-liquefaction process, enzymes convert oat starch to a high-glycemic-index-ranking sugar, and rapeseed, or canola, oil is used as an emulsifier. The result is Oatly’s particularly velvety texture and non-watery flavor, both of which I personally count as wins when it comes to nondairy milk.

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Our All-Time Favorite Desserts Starring Heavy Cream

We’ve partnered with Hood®—makers of great-tasting, high-quality cream made from real Hood Milk—to comb through our archives for our most-beloved desserts starring heavy cream. From dreamy mousse pies to easy no-churn ice cream, your bowls, plates, and…

We've partnered with Hood®—makers of great-tasting, high-quality cream made from real Hood Milk—to comb through our archives for our most-beloved desserts starring heavy cream. From dreamy mousse pies to easy no-churn ice cream, your bowls, plates, and spoons are in for a very sweet treat.


When it comes to desserts that delight—those heavenly recipes you come back to over and over again—there’s often one common denominator: heavy cream. The key ingredient in so many of the sweets we love, heavy cream (we're using Hood®) gives a sumptuousness—and yes, creaminess—to dishes that might otherwise be a little ho-hum.

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The Best Heavy Cream Substitutes for Cooking & Baking

There are thousands of recipes on our site that call for heavy cream, like penne alla vodka and creamed greens and frozen honey mousse. But do you actually need the cream? Can you replace it with milk? Or coconut milk? Or something else entirely? Toda…

There are thousands of recipes on our site that call for heavy cream, like penne alla vodka and creamed greens and frozen honey mousse. But do you actually need the cream? Can you replace it with milk? Or coconut milk? Or something else entirely? Today, we’re going to answer those questions and more.


But first, an ask-me-anything heavy cream lightning round! Let’s go:

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A Minimalist Dessert to Kick Off Berry Season

A Big Little Recipe has the smallest-possible ingredient list and big everything else: flavor, creativity, wow factor. That means five ingredients or fewer—not including water, salt, black pepper, and certain fats (like oil and butter), since we’re gue…

A Big Little Recipe has the smallest-possible ingredient list and big everything else: flavor, creativity, wow factor. That means five ingredients or fewer—not including water, salt, black pepper, and certain fats (like oil and butter), since we're guessing you have those covered. This week, guest columnist Thalia Ho, creator of the award-winning blog Butter and Brioche, is sharing a recipe from her stunning new cookbook, Wild Sweetness.


I got the taste for tartness young. The earliest memories I have are of my aunt in Austria, her outstretched hand filled with wild berries: gooseberries, raspberries, and currants that shone like tiny jewels under the sun. There were even alpine strawberries, too early for picking, but so rare that I have never seen them again.

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An Ode to Coffee Milk, New England’s Sweetest Sip

I wasn’t born in New England, but I did grow up here, and still call it home. I distinctly remember the first time I came across coffee milk. I was maybe 10 or so, in the school cafeteria, reaching for a carton of what I thought was chocolate milk. I s…

I wasn’t born in New England, but I did grow up here, and still call it home. I distinctly remember the first time I came across coffee milk. I was maybe 10 or so, in the school cafeteria, reaching for a carton of what I thought was chocolate milk. I sat down with my friends, excited to dig in (well, as excited as you could be to eat a school lunch in the ’90s). The first sip was startling, and I’m sure I reacted with all the grace and dignity you might expect from a 10-year-old.

Closer inspection of the carton revealed that it wasn’t chocolate milk at all—the label was a lighter shade of brown, for one, and sure enough, it said “coffee milk.” Huh. I’d lived in Chicago, Miami, and Cancún before moving to Maine, and I’d never heard of it. Chocolate milk, strawberry milk, sure. But this was new to me, a young transplant.

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Crispy One-Pan Salmon With Spicy Creole Cream Sauce? Heck Yes.

We’ve partnered with Hood®, makers of great-tasting, high-quality cream made from real Hood Milk, to share the weeknight dinner we’ll be making all fall long and beyond: one-pot crispy salmon with a velvety Creole cream sauce (thanks, Hood Heavy Cream!…

We've partnered with Hood®, makers of great-tasting, high-quality cream made from real Hood Milk, to share the weeknight dinner we’ll be making all fall long and beyond: one-pot crispy salmon with a velvety Creole cream sauce (thanks, Hood Heavy Cream!) that makes the dish sing.


“Bam!" I’ll never forget the iconic expression Emeril Lagasse made every time he added garlic, cayenne pepper, or a splash of rum to dishes on his classic Food Network cooking show, Emeril Live.

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How to Make Whipped Cream With…Milk?

As the pandemic rolls on and ingredient scarcity continues, you might find yourself in need of a tasty whipped topping (like for one of these), but without the cream to whip. Rather than make a less-than-essential trip to the grocery store or go withou…

As the pandemic rolls on and ingredient scarcity continues, you might find yourself in need of a tasty whipped topping (like for one of these), but without the cream to whip. Rather than make a less-than-essential trip to the grocery store or go without whipped cream altogether, you can, in fact, substitute whole milk or half-and-half for heavy cream.

Conventional baking wisdom (not to mention science) holds that it’s pretty much impossible to make whipped cream with these lower-fat dairy products: Where whole milk is between three to four percent and half-and-half contains anywhere from 10.5 to 18 percent fat, heavy cream, the ideal base for whipped cream, clocks in at 36 percent fat—at least.

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The Savory-Sweet Caramel Sauce I’m Drizzling Over Everything

We’ve partnered with Hood Cream, makers of great-tasting, high-quality cream, to share a contest-winning caramel sauce that gets its silky-smooth texture from heavy cream.

Watching granulated sugar melt down, simmer, and transform into golden carame…

We've partnered with Hood Cream, makers of great-tasting, high-quality cream, to share a contest-winning caramel sauce that gets its silky-smooth texture from heavy cream.


Watching granulated sugar melt down, simmer, and transform into golden caramel is one of my fondest childhood cooking memories. The syrup, destined to line the bottom of the baking dish that we used exclusively for crème caramel, smelled both buttery and bitter as it morphed into amber magma. I burned myself more than once trying to taste it.

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The Best Milk Substitutes for Every Kitchen Situation

I really like milk milk.

My partner, though, is very allergic—not pop-a-Lactaid allergic, but hives-and-EpiPen allergic. So, sharing meals (and spaces) has necessarily meant a sharp decline in my dairy consumption (bye, cream). It’s not that having da…

I really like milk milk.

My partner, though, is very allergic—not pop-a-Lactaid allergic, but hives-and-EpiPen allergic. So, sharing meals (and spaces) has necessarily meant a sharp decline in my dairy consumption (bye, cream). It’s not that having dairy at the table will poison him, but I’ve come to learn that meals are just slightly less enjoyable, less meaningful when you can’t share them with the person you love. (OK, the reality is less virtuous: I ordered a burrata appetizer at a restaurant a few months ago and had to eat the entire ball alone.)

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Why Aren’t More Americans Buying Canned Milk?

At the grocery store the other day, my husband and I encountered cleared shelf after cleared shelf. No more flour. Pasta. The kind of flour used to make pasta. Oat milk. But, to our absolute delight and confusion, the canned milk section appeared untou…

At the grocery store the other day, my husband and I encountered cleared shelf after cleared shelf. No more flour. Pasta. The kind of flour used to make pasta. Oat milk. But, to our absolute delight and confusion, the canned milk section appeared untouched.

Don’t get me wrong—I have nothing against oat milk (or almond, hemp, cashew, or coconut for the matter). It’s just not what I’d consider a staple. Whether preparing our home for Florida’s yearly hurricane season or a pandemic, the first thing we worry about is our canned milk inventory.

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