Soju Is the Refreshing Summer Drink You’ve Been Waiting For

As the temperature rises, our collective palate starts to shift towards light and refreshing kinds of beverages. Enter: soju, the beloved national liquor of choice in Korea that should be on your radar.

For a long time—at least in the U.S.—soju was pr…

As the temperature rises, our collective palate starts to shift towards light and refreshing kinds of beverages. Enter: soju, the beloved national liquor of choice in Korea that should be on your radar.

For a long time—at least in the U.S.—soju was primarily associated with Korean barbecue joints and Korean restaurants in general. But it’s now popping up in liquor stores across the country, with a selection of brands and flavors. This fragrant and crisp liquor is easy to drink, yet will still surely give you a buzz. And now, like many aspects of Korean culture, it’s making its way across the Pacific Ocean in a big way.

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Kimchi mac and cheese

A few years ago, I learned about kimchi grilled cheese sandwiches from the Washington Post food editor Joe Yonan. He’d included a recipe…
Source

A few years ago, I learned about kimchi grilled cheese sandwiches from the Washington Post food editor Joe Yonan. He’d included a recipe…

Source

The Best Way to Make Kimchi, According to My Korean Mom

“Did you try popping your ears?” my mom asks me over the phone, as I’m standing in the home goods aisle of H Mart.
That’s her answer for everything, including my bad week. Not to say that she takes my dips lightly. But unlike my friends or my cousins …

“Did you try popping your ears?” my mom asks me over the phone, as I’m standing in the home goods aisle of H Mart.

That’s her answer for everything, including my bad week. Not to say that she takes my dips lightly. But unlike my friends or my cousins or even my brother, Jean often tries to link my lows with something physiological. Oh, you're depressed? There must be something wrong with your chemisms. (Her sister is a nurse, so she knows.)

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How This Ancient Korean Dessert Is Making a Comeback

Tteok, bingsu, danpatjuk, soboro-ppang, freshly cut fruit—all things that come to mind when many think of quintessentially Korean desserts. And they’re not wrong, but something’s missing here.

Hangwa (한과) describes any dainty confection made by kneadi…

Tteok, bingsu, danpatjuk, soboro-ppang, freshly cut fruit—all things that come to mind when many think of quintessentially Korean desserts. And they're not wrong, but something’s missing here.

Hangwa (한과) describes any dainty confection made by kneading a grain or grain flour with a sweetener (honey, rice syrup, sugar, or some combination). They’re steamed or fried, then oftentimes coated in a hodgepodge of dried fruit, seeds, and nuts. Tasty as they are, they’re not always easy to find.

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The Best Things to Buy at H Mart, America’s Favorite Korean Grocery Store

I noticed there was a shift.

I started seeing Shin Ramyun everywhere in New York City—drugstores, supermarkets, and even corner bodegas. In a local dollar store in Washington Heights, I watched a girl rush out of line (“Will you save my spot?”) to gra…

I noticed there was a shift.

I started seeing Shin Ramyun everywhere in New York City—drugstores, supermarkets, and even corner bodegas. In a local dollar store in Washington Heights, I watched a girl rush out of line (“Will you save my spot?”) to grab a couple packs of the stuff, flashing a smile at me as she returned with the red squares, “I’m obsessed with these.”

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The Funky, Flavorful Side Dishes to Complete Any Korean Meal

“Banchan is very important to me,” says Sunny Lee, who leads the banchan program at the Korean restaurant Insa in Brooklyn, New York. “It has a very long history in Korea.”

Banchan means side dish in Korean, but in reality it’s a bunch of small dishes…

"Banchan is very important to me," says Sunny Lee, who leads the banchan program at the Korean restaurant Insa in Brooklyn, New York. "It has a very long history in Korea."

Banchan means side dish in Korean, but in reality it's a bunch of small dishes filled to the brim with pickles and the like that scatter the table at lunch or dinner. And if you've ever eaten at a Korean barbecue restaurant, or somewhere more traditional, you'll know them by their multitude, and that they all somehow fit together: often different kimchis and beans, or sprouts and tiny fish to snack on before and with a meal. I asked Sunny, and Michael Stokes, Insa's chef de cuisine, to give me a lowdown on banchan, and how its history details much of Korea's itself.

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What’s the Deal With Dalgona Cookies From ‘Squid Game’?

First, it was viewers’ obsession with Netflix food documentaries like Chef’s Table and Ugly Delicious. Next, everyone was talking about the Boom Boom Lemon Drink from Netflix’s Kate.” And now the internet can’t get enough of Dalgona Cookies, a popular South Korean street food that has captivated Squid Game viewers. Netflix’s new dramatic television show follows hundreds of cash-strapped contestants who are invited to participate in a bizarre series of children’s games. The ultimate prize is tens of millions of dollars. Those who lose are faced with deadly consequences. But along the way, a sweet challenge awaits.

What Are Dalgona Cookies?

Dalgona, which means “honeycomb toffee” in Korean, is a type of candy that rose in popularity after the Korean War. Note: this is not to be confused with Dalgona Coffee, the viral whipped coffee drink that took TikTok by storm earlier this year. Rather, it’s an inexpensive dessert that is made with just sugar and baking soda. TikTok User Cooking With Lynja tried her hand at making Dalgona Cookies—she starts by melting granulated sugar in a skillet over medium-high heat. She adds a little bit of baking soda, mixes it with the sugar until it starts to thicken and then pours the mixture into thin discs on a pre-lined baking sheet. She uses a bowl to flatten them even further, though you could certainly use a cup or plate. And then the real fun begins.

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First, it was viewers’ obsession with Netflix food documentaries like Chef’s Table and Ugly Delicious. Next, everyone was talking about the Boom Boom Lemon Drink from Netflix’s Kate.” And now the internet can’t get enough of Dalgona Cookies, a popular South Korean street food that has captivated Squid Game viewers. Netflix’s new dramatic television show follows hundreds of cash-strapped contestants who are invited to participate in a bizarre series of children’s games. The ultimate prize is tens of millions of dollars. Those who lose are faced with deadly consequences. But along the way, a sweet challenge awaits.

What Are Dalgona Cookies?

Dalgona, which means “honeycomb toffee” in Korean, is a type of candy that rose in popularity after the Korean War. Note: this is not to be confused with Dalgona Coffee, the viral whipped coffee drink that took TikTok by storm earlier this year. Rather, it's an inexpensive dessert that is made with just sugar and baking soda. TikTok User Cooking With Lynja tried her hand at making Dalgona Cookies—she starts by melting granulated sugar in a skillet over medium-high heat. She adds a little bit of baking soda, mixes it with the sugar until it starts to thicken and then pours the mixture into thin discs on a pre-lined baking sheet. She uses a bowl to flatten them even further, though you could certainly use a cup or plate. And then the real fun begins.

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A Documentary All About Korean Cold Noodles? We’re In.

Netflix’s newest food program is a splash into cold foods, namely cold noodles, ideal for this time of the year. Korean Cold Noodle Rhapsody, which came out this past Friday, is a two-part documentary series that explores the complex nuances defining o…

Netflix’s newest food program is a splash into cold foods, namely cold noodles, ideal for this time of the year. Korean Cold Noodle Rhapsody, which came out this past Friday, is a two-part documentary series that explores the complex nuances defining one of Korea’s most beloved and seemingly simple dishes: naengmyeon.

Naengmyeon translates literally to “chilled noodles,” and typically, it’s considered a summertime staple. But it turns out, there’s so much more to it. Hosted by South Korean chef and food researcher Paik Jong-Won, the series is a follow-up to 2020’s Korean Pork Belly Rhapsody. This second chapter journals Paik as he travels to different parts of Korea, from the cities of Seoul, Jinju, and Busan, to the islands of Baengnyeongdo and Jeju, to taste how naengmyeon varies from region to region. “Other people may see [naengmyun] as another item on a menu but it’s unique to us,” Paik says in the show. “I’d love for people all over the world to learn why we eat this and what the advantages are. I want to share with them what its secrets are.” As such, viewers are served countless bowls of noodles by proxy of Paik’s intense slurps, gulps, and thoughtful explanations of how each eats. But even he is just one part of the complete noodle oracle.

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14 Flavor-Packed Recipes for the Best Korean Barbecue

There’s no barbecue quite like Korean barbecue. The glorious feast, often reserved for restaurants that specialize in the technique, is defined by air saturated with smoke and tables that quite literally sizzle, due to the grills installed smack-dab in…

There’s no barbecue quite like Korean barbecue. The glorious feast, often reserved for restaurants that specialize in the technique, is defined by air saturated with smoke and tables that quite literally sizzle, due to the grills installed smack-dab in the middle. It’s a meal that seems to never end—in addition to the food you order, such as kalbi and kimchi tofu stew, there’s a smorgasbord of complimentary banchan, or side dishes, that get constantly (and generously) refilled.

While Korean barbecue makes for an extraordinary dining out experience, it shouldn’t strictly be considered restaurant cuisine. Though it’s a multicourse meal, it’s not tough to successfully execute at home if you think beyond the humble backyard franks and patties. Korean barbecue is so customizable, fun, and easy to assemble that you can actually whip it up in your own kitchen—hybrid grilling tables not required.

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A Viral Hack for Homemade Tteok in Minutes

I come from a long line of tteokbokki lovers on my mom’s side of the family. A few years ago, I even set up a Google Alert that updates me on the latest fusion flavor twists, snack launches, cutesy merch—and one hack I had to try.

Tteokbokki—spicy, st…

I come from a long line of tteokbokki lovers on my mom’s side of the family. A few years ago, I even set up a Google Alert that updates me on the latest fusion flavor twists, snack launches, cutesy merch—and one hack I had to try.

Tteokbokki—spicy, stir-fried rice cakes—is a​ staple dish in South Korea​, often sold from street carts​ and at snack shops​. Tteok traditionally come in two shapes: Tteokguk-tteok, thinly sliced circles, are the slurpable star of Dduk Guk (aka tteokguk), rice cake soup. Garaetteok, finger-sized cylinders, are the preferred vessel in saucier dishes like tteokbokki.

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