Pistachio Crème Brûlée

Classic crème brûlée gets a nutty new twist in this ultra-creamy pistachio crème brûlée recipe, made with luscious pistachio cream for a gorgeous flavor and color. With a golden brown caramelized sugar topping a touch of gold leaf for added elegance, this dessert is as stunning as it is easy to prepare, making it perfect […]

The post Pistachio Crème Brûlée first appeared on Love and Olive Oil.

Classic crème brûlée gets a nutty new twist in this ultra-creamy pistachio crème brûlée recipe, made with luscious pistachio cream for a gorgeous flavor and color.

With a golden brown caramelized sugar topping a touch of gold leaf for added elegance, this dessert is as stunning as it is easy to prepare, making it perfect for both holiday and everyday entertaining.

White ramekins with Pistachio Crème Brûlée, topped with a speck of gold leaf, one ramekin with a spoonful taken out to show the creamy texture.

I originally set out to update my pumpkin crème brûlée recipe from years ago (which is delicious, but the photos could definitely be better).

But as I scrolled through the 70+ comments on that recipe (don’t you miss the olden days of blogging when we actually got comments?! *sob*). Anyway, one of the comments mentioned having recently made a pistachio crème brûlée and, well, I changed gears real fast.

Luckily I had some pistachio creme left in the pantry from previous recipe experiments (I seriously love this stuff), and so I whipped up a test batch of this pistachio crème brûlée.

And let me tell you… it is perfection.

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Olive Oil Ice Cream with Fleur de Sel

Rich and creamy homemade ice cream made with, yes, extra virgin olive oil (E.V.O.O. I.C. if you will). The bright, fruity, and nutty flavors of olive oil translate surprisingly well in a sweet application like this one. You have to taste it to believe it! While I’m not always one to embrace unusual ice cream […]

The post Olive Oil Ice Cream with Fleur de Sel first appeared on Love and Olive Oil.

Rich and creamy homemade ice cream made with, yes, extra virgin olive oil (E.V.O.O. I.C. if you will). The bright, fruity, and nutty flavors of olive oil translate surprisingly well in a sweet application like this one. You have to taste it to believe it!

While I’m not always one to embrace unusual ice cream flavors, this recipe is an exception. Sure, olive oil is most often used in savory dishes, but don’t write it off so quickly—it makes for an ultra creamy homemade ice cream that’s somehow both bold and delicate in flavor at the same time.

Scoops of olive oil ice cream in gray ceramic dishes with a vintage ice cream scoop and bowl of fleur de sel

Like last summer’s fresh bay leaf ice cream, and the summer before that’s sourdough ice cream, this summer’s unusual ice cream flavor will most certainly surprise you. Or maybe it won’t considering the name of this blog and all.

To be honest, I’m surprised it’s taken me this long to do an olive oil ice cream recipe, for obvious reasons. After last month’s olive oil chocolate loaf cake, which is already a hit with readers, I’m rather tempted to olive-oilify all the things. I’ve done cookies and mashed potatoes, brownies and rice krispie treats… but really, anything that typically calls for butter or any other kind of oil/fat would be possible to make with olive oil instead.

And even things that don’t usually call for butter or oil. Like, say, ice cream?

Pouring extra virgin olive oil over a scoop of olive oil ice cream

I expected that olive oil ice cream would be tasty, no doubt there, but I didn’t expect it to leave me at a loss for words to describe just how good it really is. Honestly, it really has no right to be this good. Even Taylor commented that it’s one of the best ice creams I’ve made (which, if you’ve been a reader here for any length of time you’ll know that such praise from Mr. Plain-ass-chocolate is rare indeed).

It’s somehow the creamiest ice cream you’ve ever had, butterier than if it was made with actual butter, and yet still with an underlying brightness that announces itself the second it touches your tongue, shouting, “THERE IS OLIVE OIL IN THIS ICE CREAM AND IT IS GOOD” (you know, just in case the signals haven’t reached your brain yet).

It is so much better than vanilla.

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Blood Orange Curd Brownies

Vibrant in both flavor and color, these blood orange brownies feature a layer of rich, fudgy chocolate brownie topped with a tart blood orange curd. Chocolate and orange are a classic combination, but not one often seen in brownies (or if it is, flavored with little more than a bit of zest or orange extract). […]

The post Blood Orange Curd Brownies first appeared on Love and Olive Oil.

Vibrant in both flavor and color, these blood orange brownies feature a layer of rich, fudgy chocolate brownie topped with a tart blood orange curd.

Chocolate and orange are a classic combination, but not one often seen in brownies (or if it is, flavored with little more than a bit of zest or orange extract). This lovely layered treat is as much about the citrus curd as it is about the brownie, resulting in a rush of flavor and luscious texture in each and every bite.

Cut squares of Blood Orange Curd Brownies topped wtih little wedges of blood orange, on parchment with whole and cut oranges around.

I first set out to make a lemon bar brownie, with a layer of tart lemon curd on top of a rich chocolate brownie. It was an unusual idea, for sure, but I was kind of excited about it, to be honest.

But Taylor has some sort of moral opposition to the combination of lemon and chocolate, why I cannot say, and managed to talk me into doing an orange version instead.

I actually made a half batch of each, one orange, one lemon, for research purposes, and brought both with me to ceramics class along with a paper to collect votes on which one everyone preferred. It was a close match, but ultimately the orange won by a single vote. And who am I to deny the people what they want?

Neat grid of Blood Orange Curd Brownies cut into squares, one piece propped up to showcase the perfectly defined layers of brownie and deeply-colored blood orange curd.

My main challenge when testing this recipe is that orange curd, unlike lemon curd, has a tendency to be somewhat bland tasting (especially when you are comparing it bite for bite to lemon curd, which is why it surprised me that the orange version won, since it was my first batch and the orange was rather dull in comparison).

While the flavor of orange and chocolate go together beautifully, the lemon definitely had a noticeably brighter, punchier flavor. I wanted to see if I could replicate that tartness in the orange version.

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Latke Eggs Benedict

A classic eggs Benedict with a Jewish twist: a crispy potato latke topped with smoked salmon and a jammy poached egg, all smothered in a rich and creamy hollandaise. Latkes are one of my favorite foods, so I’m going to grab any opportunity I can to eat them. Including this jaw-dropping brunch recipe, where the […]

The post Latke Eggs Benedict first appeared on Love and Olive Oil.

A classic eggs Benedict with a Jewish twist: a crispy potato latke topped with smoked salmon and a jammy poached egg, all smothered in a rich and creamy hollandaise.

Latkes are one of my favorite foods, so I’m going to grab any opportunity I can to eat them. Including this jaw-dropping brunch recipe, where the crispy latkes take the place of the traditional English muffin in a classic eggs Benedict.

White plate with two Latke Eggs Benedicts and gold utensils, pitcher of hollandaise sauce in the background

One of my most memorable meals of 2021 was a weekday brunch back in June (you know, back when things were looking up. Was it memorable because it was one of the 2 times we actually ate inside a restaurant the entire year? It’s definitely possible, although I really think this meal would’ve stood out even if we’d been eating out weekly.) Anyway. Back in June, we decided to treated ourselves to our first meal out in over a year: a nice leisurely brunch on a Tuesday morning when we were practically the only patrons in the place.

The newly-opened restaurant, called Shep’s, took over the location of one of our favorite brunch spots that closed last year. The place is billed as a Jewish delicatessen, which I was obviously excited about because I could seriously eat latkes all year round and the prospect of someone else making them was too good to be true.

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Monster Cookie Bars

Do you ever feel like your dessert is… watching you? Your favorite monster cookies are now in bar form! Packed with peanut butter, oatmeal, m&ms and chocolate chips, these monstrous cookie bars are most certainly eyeing your Halloween celebrations. Monster Cookies are a combination of peanut butter, oatmeal, and m&m candies. Invented in the 1970s […]

The post Monster Cookie Bars first appeared on Love and Olive Oil.

Do you ever feel like your dessert is… watching you?

Your favorite monster cookies are now in bar form! Packed with peanut butter, oatmeal, m&ms and chocolate chips, these monstrous cookie bars are most certainly eyeing your Halloween celebrations.

Monster Cookie Bars, topped with M&Ms and candy eyeballs cut into squares on a dark background

Monster Cookies are a combination of peanut butter, oatmeal, and m&m candies. Invented in the 1970s by a midwestern photographer and cub-scout leader named Dick Wesley, they were dubbed monster cookies because they are a Frankenstein-like mashup of various other cookie components, cobbled together by what happened to be on hand (in this case, peanut butter, oats and m&ms)

They don’t usually have eyes, but, we may as well go all-in on the monster theme, right?

Especially with Halloween just around the corner.

Square grid of cut Monster Cookie Bars, one tilted on its side to show cross-section

These are more than just basic chocolate chip cookies baked in a pan.

Old fashioned oats give the bars a hearty texture that, paired with the perfect amount of peanut butter, is really, really satisfying to eat. And you may not think that a mere teaspoon of honey would make a difference, but let me tell you: it certainly does (if you love peanut butter and honey sandwiches like I do, these bars will seriously satisfy).

If that wasn’t enough, they’re packed with a heaping cup of m&m candies and dark chocolate chips studded throughout, plus more on top for good measure.

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Toast & Jam Ice Cream

Toast and raspberry jam, now in ice cream form. Or, to be more descriptive, toasted brioche ice cream with a swirl of hibiscus raspberry caramel (I mean, how good does that sound?!) How do you turn your favorite morning toast and jam into a delectable dessert? Start with a sweet custard ice cream base base, […]

The post Toast & Jam Ice Cream first appeared on Love and Olive Oil.

Toast and raspberry jam, now in ice cream form. Or, to be more descriptive, toasted brioche ice cream with a swirl of hibiscus raspberry caramel (I mean, how good does that sound?!)

How do you turn your favorite morning toast and jam into a delectable dessert? Start with a sweet custard ice cream base base, infused with actual toasted bread (trust me, it sounds weird but it’s actually amazing), and then swirl with a jammy hibiscus raspberry caramel sauce.

Bowl with stacked scoops of Toast & Jam Ice Cream, with a toast point and frozen raspberries as garnish

My thought process for this recipe was pretty convoluted, over the course of a few weeks I somehow went from a black sesame ice cream to this final toast and jam-inspired flavor. There was a peanut butter iteration in there somewhere too (think fancy PB&J) but ultimately I ended up here, with this toasted brioche ice cream and raspberry caramel ripple.

Much like my Sourdough Ice Cream, the custard base of this unique flavor is infused with actual bread; toasted brioche, to be exact, though you can pretty much do this with any kind of bread (whatever your favorite bread is for toast? Use that).

It’s always surprising to me how much flavor the bread imparts on the cream after a short 30 minute steep. I really didn’t think it would work the first time I tried it, and was simply floored when I snuck a spoonful of the freshly churned ice cream.

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Chocolate Pumpkin Pots de Creme

Silky smooth and surprisingly light, with a texture and flavor that’s like a cross between chocolate mousse and pumpkin pie, these chocolate pumpkin pots de creme would make the perfect alternative Thanksgiving dessert. Chocolate and pumpkin make for a lovely combination in these pots of pure delight, with a hint of pumpkin spice and a […]

Silky smooth and surprisingly light, with a texture and flavor that’s like a cross between chocolate mousse and pumpkin pie, these chocolate pumpkin pots de creme would make the perfect alternative Thanksgiving dessert.

Chocolate and pumpkin make for a lovely combination in these pots of pure delight, with a hint of pumpkin spice and a silky smooth texture that’ll have you licking the pot clean and clamoring for more.

Glass ramekins filled with Chocolate Pumpkin Pot de Creme on a dark gray background

This Thanksgiving is going to look a little bit different from years past… most of us are (should be!) only cooking for a few people, in which case a full scale pumpkin pie really isn’t necessary (although I do love leftover pumpkin pie for breakfast especially… but still, a whole pie for 2 or 3 people is… a lot).

Which is why this recipe is so perfect, perfectly scaled for a small gathering. It’s almost like mini, crustless pumpkin pies. Except lighter and silkier. And with chocolate. (Honestly, it’s pretty much the perfect dessert).

Row of 4 ramekins filled with chocolate pumpkin pot de creme custard

In terms of texture, the photos really don’t show just how lovely it really is. It’s silky smooth and surprisingly light, almost like a cross between pumpkin pie and chocolate mousse. The flavors of pumpkin and chocolate are perfectly balanced, neither one overpowering the other, with subtle notes of vanilla and spices that support without overwhelming.

If you’re not a fan of pumpkin pie because of its dense, somewhat pasty texture, know that these pots de creme are notably different, surprisingly light, velvety smooth and not pasty in the least.

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Ube & Coconut Cream Pie

This deliciously stunning pie features an ube and coconut cream filling in a chocolate cookie crust, and is topped with fresh whipped cream and Halloween sprinkles for a fun and festive presentation! Have you ever seen a purple pie? The unusual color and mesmerizing flavor of this ube & coconut cream pie will please your […]

This deliciously stunning pie features an ube and coconut cream filling in a chocolate cookie crust, and is topped with fresh whipped cream and Halloween sprinkles for a fun and festive presentation!

Have you ever seen a purple pie? The unusual color and mesmerizing flavor of this ube & coconut cream pie will please your palate and tantalize your tastebuds, while your eyes devour the beautiful violet hue.

Ube and Coconut Cream Pie

If you know me at all, you know that I love playing with unexpected colors in food. So it should come as no surprise that I’ve been suffering from a mild case of obsession with purple sweet potatoes, ever since I found some in the store last fall. I simply adore their vibrant natural color, and proceeded to try and make purple versions of traditional orange sweet potato recipes.

As it turns out, the two aren’t exactly interchangeable. It took me about 3 batches of gnocchi and about 4 pies before I finally realized that. The purple sweet potatoes I was using, called Stokes sweet potatoes and developed in the USA, have a much drier, starchier texture than orange sweet potatoes. This extra starchiness was problematic, especially when it came to the pie: I simply couldn’t achieve that silky smooth custard filling I was going for (rather, it felt like I’d just eaten a spoonful of wallpaper paste). Same for the gnocchi, the extra starch just resulted in a gummy, pasty texture that was less than ideal.

They were very pretty, no argument there, but they just weren’t very good (looks aren’t everything, you know).

Ube and Coconut Cream Pie

Thanksgiving came and went and I ultimately gave up my pursuit of a purple pie, tabling the idea for the next year (I decided that a purple pie would be more suitable for Halloween, anyway – bring one of these to Thanksgiving dinner and you’ll probably get a few questioning looks).

Now a year has come and gone and I’m still thinking about this purple pie. Clearly I had to try a different approach. After further research I realized that not all purple sweet potatoes are the same (as I had mistakenly assumed); rather, there are three distinct kinds of violet tubers throughout the world: Stokes purple sweet potatoes from the US, Okinawan purple sweet potatoes from Japan, and ube. All three are quite different in taste and texture and really aren’t interchangeable.

But the more I researched it, the more ube stood out to me as the best candidate for my purple pie. This purple yam from Southeast Asia is a bit sweeter and less starchy than the Stokes potatoes, and often used for flavoring dessert pastries and ice cream. Sounds perfect, right? Now I just needed to find some.

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Banana Fudge Chunk Ice Cream

With ample chunks of chewy chocolate fudge in a creamy banana custard, this homemade banana fudge chunk ice cream really hits the spot! Inspired by one of my favorite ice cream flavors from years ago, this recipe uses extra ripe bananas and high quality dark chocolate for an intense and sophisticated flavor profile. Years ago […]

With ample chunks of chewy chocolate fudge in a creamy banana custard, this homemade banana fudge chunk ice cream really hits the spot!

Inspired by one of my favorite ice cream flavors from years ago, this recipe uses extra ripe bananas and high quality dark chocolate for an intense and sophisticated flavor profile.

Overhead shot of three scoops of Banana Fudge Chunk Ice Cream on a pewter platter with three spoons on the side.

Years ago I recreated one of my favorite ice cream flavors from college.

At that time, however, I simply tossed in some chopped dark chocolate at the end of the churn. Which is great and all, but fudge chunk and chocolate chunk are not the same thing. Fudge, to me, implies a softer chocolate, something you can really sink your teeth into and chew instead of chomp.

I’d done something similar for my Sea Salt Fudge Chunk ice cream (which is still one of my favorite ice cream recipes ever).

I changed up the process a bit for this banana version. Rather than spreading out the fudge mixture onto a baking sheet, I found piping out 1/2-inch logs of chocolate was easier to to cut into uniform chunks, easy enough to warrant washing the extra piping bag.

In the end, you’re rewarded with chewy chunks of rich dark chocolate swimming in a creamy banana custard base.

(And yes, I know this recipe leaves you with 4 leftover egg whites. These can easily be frozen for a later time, or if you’re looking for something quick to use them up now, a double batch of my Soft Amaretti Cookies would be perfect!)

Sheet pan with scoops of Banana Fudge Chunk Ice Cream and a partially-full carton.

This was also the inaugural run of my new ice cream machine.

Previously I used (and loved) the KitchenAid ice cream attachment, which worked great, but I hated having to freeze the bowl a full 24-48 hours before I could churn a batch of ice cream. And if I needed to churn two batches (testing recipes I’ll often make 2-3 variations at the same time to see which is best), it was simply too long to have to wait. So I splurged and treated myself to a compressor-based ice cream machine, which can easily churn multiple batches back to back.

If you make homemade ice cream with any regularity, and have the storage space (it’s a good deal larger than the freezer bowl versions), I highly recommend a compressor-based machine. It’s a game changer!

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