Can You Really Bake When a Recipe Tells You to Fry?

It is a truth universally acknowledged that whenever a recipe for fried food is published—be it chicken or French fries, falafel or doughnuts—the first question will be whether that food can be baked instead.
And fair enough! Frying is messy, stinky, …

It is a truth universally acknowledged that whenever a recipe for fried food is published—be it chicken or French fries, falafel or doughnuts—the first question will be whether that food can be baked instead.

And fair enough! Frying is messy, stinky, and splatter-y. While I'd happily accept a fried fish taco if someone else is offering, I don't want to fry on a weeknight in my small, ventilation-poor kitchen (and I imagine you don't either). Unless I have to, that is.

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On Navigating the Holiday Season After Loss

I started feeling anxious about Thanksgiving and Christmas in August. By October, I decided the best way to get through the holidays was to escape them.

My husband, Erik, had died suddenly in a mountain-climbing accident in late May. Since then, I had…

I started feeling anxious about Thanksgiving and Christmas in August. By October, I decided the best way to get through the holidays was to escape them.

My husband, Erik, had died suddenly in a mountain-climbing accident in late May. Since then, I had spent my days in a sad stupor of grief: crying, struggling to eat, and grasping for motivation even to get dressed.

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‘How the Other Half Eats’ Unpacks Nutritional Inequality in America

Have you ever thought about how differently one family eats compared with another? Sociologist and ethnographer Priya Fielding-Singh, PhD, certainly has. Her book How the Other Half Eats offers a critical examination of nutritional inequality in America through the lens of social class, race, and health, intimately following four families across the income spectrum in an exploration of the meaning of food itself. The book reveals the thin tightrope that parents—mostly mothers—must walk to feed their children while maintaining their dignity and sense of worth, even as others judge and critique their food choices. In this excerpt, Fielding-Singh explores how children’s hunger and pickiness work to shape the food that makes its way onto families’ dinner plates.


For low-income moms, financial scarcity can give way to food scarcity. The ever-present threat of running out of money means living with the fear that food can also just as easily run out.

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Have you ever thought about how differently one family eats compared with another? Sociologist and ethnographer Priya Fielding-Singh, PhD, certainly has. Her book How the Other Half Eats offers a critical examination of nutritional inequality in America through the lens of social class, race, and health, intimately following four families across the income spectrum in an exploration of the meaning of food itself. The book reveals the thin tightrope that parents—mostly mothers—must walk to feed their children while maintaining their dignity and sense of worth, even as others judge and critique their food choices. In this excerpt, Fielding-Singh explores how children’s hunger and pickiness work to shape the food that makes its way onto families’ dinner plates.


For low-income moms, financial scarcity can give way to food scarcity. The ever-present threat of running out of money means living with the fear that food can also just as easily run out.

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Drinking Is a Huge Part of Thanksgiving—Here’s Why I’m Avoiding It

I stopped drinking in late 2018, the part of the year that leans toward Thanksgiving and the downhill cascade of holidays that follow it. I wasn’t dealing with an addiction, exactly, and therefore my experience of quitting alcohol was much easier than …

I stopped drinking in late 2018, the part of the year that leans toward Thanksgiving and the downhill cascade of holidays that follow it. I wasn’t dealing with an addiction, exactly, and therefore my experience of quitting alcohol was much easier than it is for many people: I didn’t like how alcohol made me feel anymore, and I was no longer getting any enjoyment from it to counterbalance its negative effects in my life. In short, I didn’t like drinking, so I stopped doing it. For this reason, I try to say that I stopped or quit drinking rather than that I got sober, to make a clear differentiation between the relatively straightforward process of letting go of a bad habit, and the far thornier and often lifelong struggle of a recovering alcoholic.

The truth is that I rarely miss drinking, and when I do, it’s occasion-based and never actually about the booze itself. There are certain events—almost always a celebration of some kind, whether an official holiday or just the festive exhale on a Friday afternoon at the end of a long week—that make me wish for the gesture of a drink, without the actual drink itself. Thanksgiving has been one of the times when I have had to work the hardest to re-create that gesture, underlining the holiday aspect of a holiday through other means.

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The Personal Clutter No One is Talking About

Simply Living is a new column by Christine Platt, aka the Afrominimalist. Each month, Christine shares her refreshing approach to living with less, with clever tips for decluttering, making eco-friendly swaps, and creating a more mindful living space t…

Simply Living is a new column by Christine Platt, aka the Afrominimalist. Each month, Christine shares her refreshing approach to living with less, with clever tips for decluttering, making eco-friendly swaps, and creating a more mindful living space that's all you.


When it comes to our personal belongings—especially the things we’re most fond of—it’s not uncommon to find ourselves confronting clutter. The linen closet with mixed bedding and towels that are in disarray; the spice cabinet with jars so old the contents have formed clumps; and the closet that needs to be pared down.

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How to Share a Bed With a Partner—& Actually Get a Good Night’s Sleep

Next month, I’m moving in with my boyfriend after three years of long distance. I’m elated to make dinners together and eat them in front of the TV; have a buddy to run errands with on Saturdays; and settle into our first little home together. One thin…

Next month, I’m moving in with my boyfriend after three years of long distance. I’m elated to make dinners together and eat them in front of the TV; have a buddy to run errands with on Saturdays; and settle into our first little home together. One thing I’m more apprehensive about? Sharing a bed.

We’ll be going from playing house on weekends to sharing my beloved queen bed on work nights, weekends, and naps in between. We’re generally okay sleepers (fine, I’m a blanket hog and I snore), and he gets up early (no biggie), but what works for weekends now needs to work Every. Single. Night.

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4 Expert Tips for a Mindfulness Practice You Can Actually Keep Up

It’s safe to say that over the past year-plus, we’ve learned a thing or two about what’s really important, from learning how to cook to creating a good work-life balance (especially for those of us working from home). In more ways than one, the pandemi…

It’s safe to say that over the past year-plus, we’ve learned a thing or two about what’s really important, from learning how to cook to creating a good work-life balance (especially for those of us working from home). In more ways than one, the pandemic-induced isolation provided the perfect backdrop for self-centering. Maybe you’ve picked up new habits that prioritize well-being: learned how to be present and intentional with your choices; started to take better care of your body, whatever that looks like for you; or made an effort to put mental health first through mindful practices like meditation.

This year has brought some reprieve and a glimmer of what our “new normal” looks like. But as we head back into the world in 2021, how do we maintain the mindful practices that carried us through such a trying time? With many jobs forming hybrid in-office schedules, and schools starting back, finding the time for daily meditations will no doubt be difficult; still, the importance of the practice has not changed. Though meditation is a time of self-reflection, it helps to have a little guidance from trusted instructors. For thoughts on how to keep the mindful mindset strong, I spoke with some experts: author, writing-to-heal facilitator, and self-care advocate Alex Elle and mindful meditation artist and registered psychiatric nurse Dora Kamu.

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What Is CBN? What to Know About the Latest Cannabis-Based Sleep Aid

For the last couple of years, CBD has taken over the beauty, food and drink, and wellness industries in the form of every type of product ranging from bath salts to fruit gummies to seltzer water to chocolate to oil drops. However, there’s a new cannabis-derived chemical that is soon to become just as popular as CBD, thanks to its ability to aid in a good night’s sleep. Meet CBN. It’s a cannabinoid found in the cannabis plant that offers relaxing, sleepy properties, which means your sleep might be more restful after consuming CBN gummies or oil drops.

What Is CBN?

Cannabinol, aka CBN, is derived from hemp plants. “CBN and CBD are both cannabinoids found in the cannabis plant, but they have different chemical structures,” explains Dr. Elizabeth Ardillo. When THC (Tetrahydrocannabinol), which is the main active ingredient in cannabis, is heated and exposed to Co2 (oxygen), it converts to what is known as CBN. So what makes it the latest and greatest cannabis-derived product? “CBN products are popular right now because they help promote a better night’s sleep. They have a relaxing effect,” she adds.

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For the last couple of years, CBD has taken over the beauty, food and drink, and wellness industries in the form of every type of product ranging from bath salts to fruit gummies to seltzer water to chocolate to oil drops. However, there’s a new cannabis-derived chemical that is soon to become just as popular as CBD, thanks to its ability to aid in a good night’s sleep. Meet CBN. It’s a cannabinoid found in the cannabis plant that offers relaxing, sleepy properties, which means your sleep might be more restful after consuming CBN gummies or oil drops.

What Is CBN?

Cannabinol, aka CBN, is derived from hemp plants. “CBN and CBD are both cannabinoids found in the cannabis plant, but they have different chemical structures,” explains Dr. Elizabeth Ardillo. When THC (Tetrahydrocannabinol), which is the main active ingredient in cannabis, is heated and exposed to Co2 (oxygen), it converts to what is known as CBN. So what makes it the latest and greatest cannabis-derived product? “CBN products are popular right now because they help promote a better night’s sleep. They have a relaxing effect,” she adds.

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The Cure for My Bad Sleep Turned Out to Be a Lamp

I don’t sleep well, and I’m not sure why.

It’s not like I have trouble falling asleep, because I don’t. It’s the staying asleep that is a bigger problem. The jerking awake an hour later; the tossing and turning at 3 a.m. (my witching hour, perfect for…

I don’t sleep well, and I’m not sure why.

It’s not like I have trouble falling asleep, because I don’t. It’s the staying asleep that is a bigger problem. The jerking awake an hour later; the tossing and turning at 3 a.m. (my witching hour, perfect for both planning and worrying about not planning enough); and eventually, waking up too early for no apparent reason at all.

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Herbal Teas Give Me an Anxiety-Free Boost. Here Are My 5 Faves.

It’s easy for some people to write off herbal tea as a wimpy alternative to the caffeinated stuff. Of course, even caffeinated tea has been called a weak replacement for coffee, though we know that’s not at all the case. My point is: Herbal tea can be …

It’s easy for some people to write off herbal tea as a wimpy alternative to the caffeinated stuff. Of course, even caffeinated tea has been called a weak replacement for coffee, though we know that’s not at all the case. My point is: Herbal tea can be vitalizing in its own way.

I’m an anxious person in general, and have become even more so throughout the pandemic. While my morning caffeine is nonnegotiable, when I try to throw in an afternoon cup, my body reacts swiftly and unfavorably. Once I began incorporating herbal teas into my routine, I found that they gave me the boost I’d been looking for, albeit not a caffeinated one. I make a pot of smoothing chamomile tea with oat milk and honey as a sub for an afternoon cup of jitter-inducing coffee (the pastry on the side is, of course, nonnegotiable). A cup of peppermint tea after a meal has a similar invigorating quality as an espresso (without, of course, the caffeine hit), plus it has some amaro-like vibes, thanks to its vegetal notes woven with menthol and a bit of bitterness. Smoky-sweet rooibos tea is even being used by some nonalcoholic drink creators, like the Digesteaf cocktail in Julia Bainbridge’s Good Drinks, which features an "amaro" concentrate from Steven Smith Teamaker, a blend of dried roots, flowers, and rooibos tea leaves. “With almost every sip, it morphs from bitter to sweet and then back again,” writes Bainbridge of the brew.

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