Turducken Has Been Weird for a Very Long Time

A turducken is weird. Like very weird. It may seem like it’s part of a recent trend in creating super over-the-top food creations all for the sake of posting a jaw-dropping photo on Instagram, but this opulent creation dates back centuries. Three…

A turducken is weird. Like very weird. It may seem like it’s part of a recent trend in creating super over-the-top food creations all for the sake of posting a jaw-dropping photo on Instagram, but this opulent creation dates back centuries. Three incredible meats stuffed on top of one another and rolled up into one package? And a bread stuffing too? It’s the ultimate Thanksgiving dinner. But as bizarre as turducken may seem on the surface, it’s one dish that’s part of a robust culinary tradition known as engastration, which is essentially food stuffed into more food. As you slice deeper and deeper into the story (and the meat itself), it only gets more delicious and odd. Ahead, you’ll find tips for how to make a turducken and dive deep into the robust history of this popular 20th-century dish.

The History of Turducken

The late Cajun chef Paul Prudhomme claimed to have invented the turducken (a turkey stuffed with a duck stuffed with a chicken) in the 1970s. He became synonymous with the dish—and even trademarked the name in 1986 (Turducken™). Yet, there are plenty of skeptics who aren’t quite sold on the origins of the turducken and Prudhomme’s ownership of the invention. 

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Making Crème Fraîche at Home Has Never Been Easier

A few months into my first year in college, I realized that I hadn’t prepared for such brokeness. In an attempt to pull myself out of college poverty, I applied for a waitressing job at a local brewpub. Aside from some insignificant retail jobs that la…

A few months into my first year in college, I realized that I hadn't prepared for such brokeness. In an attempt to pull myself out of college poverty, I applied for a waitressing job at a local brewpub. Aside from some insignificant retail jobs that lasted maybe a few weeks, I had no relevant work experience. So when it came time for my interview, I did what I seem to do best: I winged it. I spoke about everything that wasn't relevanthow pretty the detailing on the general manager's shirt was, how nicely designed the restaurant was (it had a hideous interior), how challenging school was, etc.

Eventually I had to face the music and come clean, admitting to having no experience, but really, really needing money. The general manager was visibly bummed; she genuinely wanted to hire me, but how could she at this point? She looked down at my application and said, "Well, okay, so you have no experience. I can teach you how to juggle tables. I care more about people who know and like food. Can you answer this: What is crème fraîche?" My eyes lit up immediately.

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How to Make a 6-Pack of Homemade Fermented Drinks

Many folks have jumped on the kombucha bandwagon, and it’s clear why—that vinegary, effervescent kick (with a bonus of probiotics) is a welcome thrill in the world of “before 5 o’clock” drinks. And the best part is that kombucha is just the begin…

Many folks have jumped on the kombucha bandwagon, and it's clear why—that vinegary, effervescent kick (with a bonus of probiotics) is a welcome thrill in the world of "before 5 o'clock" drinks. And the best part is that kombucha is just the beginning: It's not alone in its world of sour drinkables. For your experimenting pleasure, there are two categories of fermented drinks: those that require a starter or SCOBY (symbiotic colony of bacteria and yeast), and those that do not (wild ferments).

The following drinks can be made at home, but some require a SCOBY—and who knows, all you might have to do is tap into your network (like our Contributors Editor Sarah did!) and you'll likely find fermentation enthusiasts who are thrilled to share these renewable resources with you. So up the ante of your fermented drink game by experimenting with a sampler six-pack.

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Here’s How to Properly Shut Down a Grill After a Barbecue

Inspired by conversations on the Food52 Hotline, we’re sharing tips and tricks that make navigating all of our kitchens easier and more fun.
Today: Shutting down a grill is just as important as starting it up. Read More >>

Inspired by conversations on the Food52 Hotline, we're sharing tips and tricks that make navigating all of our kitchens easier and more fun.

Today: Shutting down a grill is just as important as starting it up.

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How to Make the Best Grilled Scallops

The best grilled scallops are crisp on the outside and tender on the inside—perfect to plunk on top of arugula salad, buttered spaghetti, creamy risotto, you name it, or served alongside everything from potato salad to charred corn. The worst gri…

The best grilled scallops are crisp on the outside and tender on the inside—perfect to plunk on top of arugula salad, buttered spaghetti, creamy risotto, you name it, or served alongside everything from potato salad to charred corn. The worst grilled scallops, meanwhile, are overcooked and rubbery and not at all what we want.

To help you reach Peak Scallop Perfection (it's out there!), we called in food writer and classically trained cook Christine Burns Rudalevige, who shares her top nine cooking tips below—plus, a ruby red grapefruit and chile glaze that the scallops totally love. (Psst: They also love an extra-cold rosé to go with.) And for even more A+ grilling recipes, tips, and tricks, check out our book Any Night Grilling by Paula Disbrowe. Now, fire up the grill and let's get started. 

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7 Ways to Use Cara Cara Oranges in the Kitchen (& Around the House)

We’ve teamed up with California Citrus Growers to pull back the peel and share all the citrus-y wonders of oranges from the Golden State. Here, we’re showing you how to use beautiful Cara Cara oranges (they’re in season till May!) in the kitchen and be…

We’ve teamed up with California Citrus Growers to pull back the peel and share all the citrus-y wonders of oranges from the Golden State. Here, we’re showing you how to use beautiful Cara Cara oranges (they're in season till May!) in the kitchen and beyond. And psst: Did you know that just one Cara Cara orange gives you 100% of the daily recommended amount of Vitamin C? Pretty sweet.


California Cara Cara oranges always make their way into our citrus bowl when they’re in season, which is roughly from December until May. Underneath their unassuming orange skin is the most gorgeous pink fruit you’ve ever seen (it inspired us to paint the bathroom in our new apartment the same color—I'm not kidding).

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You’re Just 3 Ingredients Away From the Best Corn on the Cob

Nothing should have to be confusing about corn.
But your mom may have told you to boil it for ten minutes; your mother-in-law, for seven. Your dad may have let it roll on the stove until he remembered it. There’s been an age-old debate on the bes…

Nothing should have to be confusing about corn.

But your mom may have told you to boil it for ten minutes; your mother-in-law, for seven. Your dad may have let it roll on the stove until he remembered it. There’s been an age-old debate on the best way to cook corn on the cob – and, at the center, how long to boil it.

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What to Do With Crunchy, Sweet & Spicy Peppers

It’s the season of overflowing market bags, heavy CSA boxes, and gardens run amok. Alexandra Stafford of Alexandra Cooks is showing us how to store, prep, and make the most of the bounty, without wasting a scrap.
Today: How to store…

It's the season of overflowing market bags, heavy CSA boxes, and gardens run amok. Alexandra Stafford of Alexandra Cooks is showing us how to store, prep, and make the most of the bounty, without wasting a scrap.

Today: How to store, prep, and make the most of the season's pepper crop, whether you have just a handful or you picked so many you should be called Peter Piper. Start with Yotam Ottolenghi's marinated pepper salad.

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How to Make French Toast—A Definitive Guide

It’s late, you just got home, and you’re hungry. You have some stale bread, some eggs, and some dairy. Or: It’s Sunday morning, and your kids are shrieking, and you want to cook something quick and easy that will get them all starry-eyed, quiet, and ha…

It's late, you just got home, and you're hungry. You have some stale bread, some eggs, and some dairy. Or: It's Sunday morning, and your kids are shrieking, and you want to cook something quick and easy that will get them all starry-eyed, quiet, and happy. Or: You're tired of salads and roasted vegetables and even meat and fish and you want something soothing, something easy, and something decidedly un-seasonal for dinner. Good thing you know how to make French toast

The French call it pain perdu, meaning "lost bread," but "found bread" might be more accurate. As in, you don't know what to eat, so you look around. Your humble pantry holds just a few basics: milk, eggs, and, forgotten in a cupboard, a hunk of stale bread. It's an excellent find, because with a little alchemy, you'll soon have culinary gold. 

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Madras Curry Powder Is the Versatile Spice Blend You Can (& Should!) Make at Home

Here, Michelle Peters-Jones of The Tiffin Box shows you how to mix your own Madras curry powder and customized spice blends to lend the boost that your recipes have been looking for.
If you go to a grocer in India and ask for curry powder, yo…

Here, Michelle Peters-Jones of The Tiffin Box shows you how to mix your own Madras curry powder and customized spice blends to lend the boost that your recipes have been looking for.

If you go to a grocer in India and ask for curry powder, you’re likely to be asked, "Which one?" There is no such thing as a single "curry powder" in Indian cuisine; each dish has its own combination of spices that makes it unique.

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