Here’s How to Emulsify Anything

A creamy hollandaise sauce drizzled over eggs Benedict. A rich, herby bearnaise sauce served on the side of a pan-seared steak. A rich dressing tossed over crunchy lettuce and juicy tomatoes. These silky, luxurious sauces all get their body via a proce…

A creamy hollandaise sauce drizzled over eggs Benedict. A rich, herby bearnaise sauce served on the side of a pan-seared steak. A rich dressing tossed over crunchy lettuce and juicy tomatoes. These silky, luxurious sauces all get their body via a process called emulsification. To understand emulsification—aka the process that happens when oil and water mix to create stable substances like mayonnaise, salad dressing, and even milk—we are going to have to talk science for a minute.

We promise that there will be no atomic diagrams, no Latin, and no, Bill Nye won’t be standing by your side in the kitchen. And if you hang on until the end, you’ll be rewarded with creamy aiolis, mayonnaise that won’t break, and vinaigrettes that hold together for days in the fridge. 

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A Case for Making Homemade Furikake (Thank Us Later)

Furikake, the savory and salty Japanese seasoning for sprinkling on plain rice, merits an entire section even in Manhattan’s tiniest Japanese markets.

And if you’ve tasted this Japanese condiment, you understand why: Furikake enlivens a plain bowl of …

Furikake, the savory and salty Japanese seasoning for sprinkling on plain rice, merits an entire section even in Manhattan’s tiniest Japanese markets.

And if you’ve tasted this Japanese condiment, you understand why: Furikake enlivens a plain bowl of steamed rice: Add some mayo and a fried egg and you can call it a meal. I relied heavily on furikake when I lived in a dorm room with just a rice cooker for making dinner. It transformed something that was mediocre at best (white rice) to something delicious and satisfying.

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How to Make Cold Brew Coffee—No Equipment Needed!

Maybe you wait for the summer months to enjoy your coffee over ice. Or maybe you’re someone who has iced coffee all year round. Either way, for coffee fans, there’s no denying how refreshing an iced coffee can be when the weather warms up. But buying a…

Maybe you wait for the summer months to enjoy your coffee over ice. Or maybe you're someone who has iced coffee all year round. Either way, for coffee fans, there's no denying how refreshing an iced coffee can be when the weather warms up. But buying a cup of cold brew from the local coffee shop every day adds up, which is why we like to make cold brew coffee at home—and it couldn't be easier. There are so many different methods for making cold brew—you can purchase pre-portioned packets of cold brew coffee from brands like Grady’s, Chamberlain Coffee, or Stone Street Coffee, which are blindingly easy to use. Just place one steep packet in a large mason jar, fill it with water, and let it sit at room temperature for 12 to 24 hours. While these are by far the most convenient method for making cold brew coffee at home, there are even more cost-efficient ways to do it.

For the least expensive way to enjoy cold brew, turn to other methods like making cold brew coffee concentrate in a French press, which requires nothing more than your favorite coffee grounds and cold water. There are a lot of pricy coffee makers that promise to make delicious cold brew coffee at home, but I promise that you don’t need them, coffee lover.

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What to Do with an Overload of Radishes

I think by now we all know the formula: Radishes + salt = appetizer elegance. Radishes + butter + baguette = snack time nirvana. Radishes + rustic farm table + screen-printed textiles = a food photographer’s dream.But what if you’re on your 100th radis…

I think by now we all know the formula: Radishes + salt = appetizer elegance. Radishes + butter + baguette = snack time nirvana. Radishes + rustic farm table + screen-printed textiles = a food photographer's dream.

But what if you're on your 100th radish bunch of the summer and these peppery gems need to play a greater role? More than something to tide us over between meals, more than just a garnish? What if a bundle of radishes on its own must be tonight’s vegetable?

CSA subscribers, prolific gardeners, and enthusiastic market-goers alike know this issue all too well. Sure, radishes and butter and salt are made for each other, but come mid-summer, even the most striking ombre roots begin to lose their luster.

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Homemade Powdered Sugar? It’s Way Easier Than You Think

As a professional baker, I always have powdered sugar on hand. In my line of work, it’s safe to assume that at a moment’s notice, I’ll need to dust a torte, whip meringue, toss puppy chow together, or make chocolate fudge. It’s not that I regularly mak…

As a professional baker, I always have powdered sugar on hand. In my line of work, it’s safe to assume that at a moment's notice, I’ll need to dust a torte, whip meringue, toss puppy chow together, or make chocolate fudge. It’s not that I regularly make my own powdered sugar (I promise I’m not THAT person)—or that buying some is particularly strenuous or expensive—but it’s handy to know how to make homemade powdered sugar for two big reasons.

Sometimes you find yourself without confectioners’ sugar and the thought of running to the grocery store doesn’t appeal in the slightest. Maybe it’s a snow day and you need some to make homemade marshmallows for a cup of hot cocoa, or it’s hours away from your little one’s birthday and you're frantically trying to whip buttercream frosting for a birthday cake. Maybe you thought you had enough and then the little bag of sugar had half a cup shy of what you were expecting. Or you want the results of powdered sugar with something other than granulated white sugar (I’ve made it with raw cane sugar and coconut sugar, but you can turn nearly any type of granulated sugar into powdered in minutes). This may be because you’d rather use natural sweeteners or to satisfy a dietary concern or that’s what you have to use up. Either way, the flavor won’t be affected. You can use brown sugar for a richer molasses flavor, but know that you won’t achieve a pure white fluffy frosting; instead, it will have a light brown undertone.

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Yes, You Can (& Should) Make Homemade Feta Cheese

It’s always more fun to DIY. Every week, we’ll spare you a trip to the grocery store and show you how to make small batches of great foods at home.
Today: With some special ingredients and a bit of patience, you can easily make crumbly, salty feta chee…

It's always more fun to DIY. Every week, we'll spare you a trip to the grocery store and show you how to make small batches of great foods at home.

Today: With some special ingredients and a bit of patience, you can easily make crumbly, salty feta cheese at home. Mary Karlin, author of Mastering Fermentation, shows us how.

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Making Paneer at Home Is Totally Doable, Promise

Considering that India is one of the largest milk producing countries in the world, it is rather surprising that it doesn’t have a major cheese-making culture. You won’t find stinky and moldy cheeses in the shops that line India’s busy, narrow streets …

Considering that India is one of the largest milk producing countries in the world, it is rather surprising that it doesn't have a major cheese-making culture. You won't find stinky and moldy cheeses in the shops that line India's busy, narrow streets —but almost every dairy shop carries paneer, an immensely popular fresh cheese. 

Paneer is such a dominant culinary symbol in India because, unlike other cheeses, it doesn’t require animal rennet. This makes it perfect for the predominantly vegetarian Indian diet. Paneer makes a great meat substitute in most Indian recipes, but even non-vegetarians like myself love it. From sweets, to fried snacks, to cream-drunk royal curries, paneer is used in North Indian dishes extensively. Its mild taste, texture (similar to that of halloumi or tofu), and capability to soak in flavors and withstand high cooking temperatures make it a household favorite. 

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Turducken Has Been Weird for a Very Long Time

A turducken is weird. Like very weird. It may seem like it’s part of a recent trend in creating super over-the-top food creations all for the sake of posting a jaw-dropping photo on Instagram, but this opulent creation dates back centuries. Three…

A turducken is weird. Like very weird. It may seem like it’s part of a recent trend in creating super over-the-top food creations all for the sake of posting a jaw-dropping photo on Instagram, but this opulent creation dates back centuries. Three incredible meats stuffed on top of one another and rolled up into one package? And a bread stuffing too? It’s the ultimate Thanksgiving dinner. But as bizarre as turducken may seem on the surface, it’s one dish that’s part of a robust culinary tradition known as engastration, which is essentially food stuffed into more food. As you slice deeper and deeper into the story (and the meat itself), it only gets more delicious and odd. Ahead, you’ll find tips for how to make a turducken and dive deep into the robust history of this popular 20th-century dish.

The History of Turducken

The late Cajun chef Paul Prudhomme claimed to have invented the turducken (a turkey stuffed with a duck stuffed with a chicken) in the 1970s. He became synonymous with the dish—and even trademarked the name in 1986 (Turducken™). Yet, there are plenty of skeptics who aren’t quite sold on the origins of the turducken and Prudhomme’s ownership of the invention. 

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Making Crème Fraîche at Home Has Never Been Easier

A few months into my first year in college, I realized that I hadn’t prepared for such brokeness. In an attempt to pull myself out of college poverty, I applied for a waitressing job at a local brewpub. Aside from some insignificant retail jobs that la…

A few months into my first year in college, I realized that I hadn't prepared for such brokeness. In an attempt to pull myself out of college poverty, I applied for a waitressing job at a local brewpub. Aside from some insignificant retail jobs that lasted maybe a few weeks, I had no relevant work experience. So when it came time for my interview, I did what I seem to do best: I winged it. I spoke about everything that wasn't relevanthow pretty the detailing on the general manager's shirt was, how nicely designed the restaurant was (it had a hideous interior), how challenging school was, etc.

Eventually I had to face the music and come clean, admitting to having no experience, but really, really needing money. The general manager was visibly bummed; she genuinely wanted to hire me, but how could she at this point? She looked down at my application and said, "Well, okay, so you have no experience. I can teach you how to juggle tables. I care more about people who know and like food. Can you answer this: What is crème fraîche?" My eyes lit up immediately.

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How to Make a 6-Pack of Homemade Fermented Drinks

Many folks have jumped on the kombucha bandwagon, and it’s clear why—that vinegary, effervescent kick (with a bonus of probiotics) is a welcome thrill in the world of “before 5 o’clock” drinks. And the best part is that kombucha is just the begin…

Many folks have jumped on the kombucha bandwagon, and it's clear why—that vinegary, effervescent kick (with a bonus of probiotics) is a welcome thrill in the world of "before 5 o'clock" drinks. And the best part is that kombucha is just the beginning: It's not alone in its world of sour drinkables. For your experimenting pleasure, there are two categories of fermented drinks: those that require a starter or SCOBY (symbiotic colony of bacteria and yeast), and those that do not (wild ferments).

The following drinks can be made at home, but some require a SCOBY—and who knows, all you might have to do is tap into your network (like our Contributors Editor Sarah did!) and you'll likely find fermentation enthusiasts who are thrilled to share these renewable resources with you. So up the ante of your fermented drink game by experimenting with a sampler six-pack.

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