What to Do With Garlic Scapes—Plus, Our Favorite Recipes That Use This Curly Plant

There’s nothing better than returning from the farmers market to transform a bunch of garlic scapes into tempura-battered appetizer—complete with a sidecar of garlic aioli. This time of year, bags filled with the serpentine stems can be found eve…

There's nothing better than returning from the farmers market to transform a bunch of garlic scapes into tempura-battered appetizer—complete with a sidecar of garlic aioli. This time of year, bags filled with the serpentine stems can be found everywhere at farmers' markets, and unlike many of the fleeting jewels of summer, garlic scapes are a bargain. 

Garlic scapes grow from hardneck garlic bulbs, and farmers trim them because they draw energy away from the forming bulbs. They taste sweet, like a chive or scallion, with a more mild—but familiar—garlicky zing. Finely sliced, scapes can be used just the same as garlic cloves, such as sautéed with vegetables, puréed into pesto and hummus, or roasted with meats and vegetables.

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OK, I’ll Bite: What Are Ramps?

If you see a crowd gathering around a stall at your local farmers market any time between mid-April and early June, odds are you’ve stumbled across someone selling ramps. Let me tell you, nothing gets people who know and love ramps more excited than se…

If you see a crowd gathering around a stall at your local farmers market any time between mid-April and early June, odds are you’ve stumbled across someone selling ramps. Let me tell you, nothing gets people who know and love ramps more excited than seeing those first green leaves on a warm spring morning. Of course, by appearance alone, they’re simply yet another plant in a sea of green at the market. So, what’s all the fuss about? What are ramps?

What Are Ramps, Anyway?

Ramps (allium tricoccum), sometimes referred to as wild leeks or wild garlic, are technically a wild onion that grow most abundantly in the eastern and central U.S. and Canada (though you can find them showing their verdant heads in a couple other southern and western American states). Ramp patches typically begin to sprout in wooded areas around early April, and last until May or early June.

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What to Do With Crunchy, Sweet & Spicy Peppers

It’s the season of overflowing market bags, heavy CSA boxes, and gardens run amok. Alexandra Stafford of Alexandra Cooks is showing us how to store, prep, and make the most of the bounty, without wasting a scrap.
Today: How to store…

It's the season of overflowing market bags, heavy CSA boxes, and gardens run amok. Alexandra Stafford of Alexandra Cooks is showing us how to store, prep, and make the most of the bounty, without wasting a scrap.

Today: How to store, prep, and make the most of the season's pepper crop, whether you have just a handful or you picked so many you should be called Peter Piper. Start with Yotam Ottolenghi's marinated pepper salad.

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Fridge Full of Carrots? Here’s What to Make

Winter is coming and we’re serious about keeping farmers market produce on the menu. Alexandra Stafford of Alexandra Cooks shows us how to store, prep, and make the most of it, without wasting a scrap. 
Today: Carrots dese…

Winter is coming and we're serious about keeping farmers market produce on the menu. Alexandra Stafford of Alexandra Cooks shows us how to store, prep, and make the most of it, without wasting a scrap. 

Today: Carrots deserve more than their perennial role as a crudité. Here's how to store, prep, and serve this overlooked root—and how to make the best broth you've had this season. 

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So—What’s the Difference Between Pumpkin & Squash?

What’s in a name? When it comes to pumpkins, not much.
The word pumpkin probably makes you think of a large, round orange specimen ready for carving, but any hard-skinned squash could be called a pumpkin—there’s no botanical distinction tha…

What's in a name? When it comes to pumpkins, not much.

The word pumpkin probably makes you think of a large, round orange specimen ready for carving, but any hard-skinned squash could be called a pumpkin—there’s no botanical distinction that makes a pumpkin a pumpkin

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Your Handy Summer Fruits Guide

I don’t know about you, but the past two months (is it three now?) have passed by in a blur. Some days seem to stretch on for weeks, other weeks collapse to blips.

It’s hard to feel or believe in summer’s impending arrival, though the signs around me …

I don’t know about you, but the past two months (is it three now?) have passed by in a blur. Some days seem to stretch on for weeks, other weeks collapse to blips.

It's hard to feel or believe in summer's impending arrival, though the signs around me suggest otherwise. Longer days. Slowly, more green (last week, sorrel; this week, pea shoots) in my CSA box. Seeds that are no longer seedlings but now full-fledged plants. What's helping me play catchup with my surroundings? Nigel Slater’s Ripe (2012).

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The ABCs of Good Food: A Is for Access

What’s the difference between cage-free, pastured, and humane eggs? And why do they cost eight dollars at the farmers’ market, but a dollar at the supermarket? What does “organic” really mean? The ABCs of Good Food will attempt to answer these question…

What's the difference between cage-free, pastured, and humane eggs? And why do they cost eight dollars at the farmers' market, but a dollar at the supermarket? What does "organic" really mean? The ABCs of Good Food will attempt to answer these questions—and ask some new ones—one letter at a time.


What Is Food Access?

Access to food refers to our ability to source good, quality food—food that's filling and adequate for our individual needs. For many, this means it's fresh and minimally processed, and good for the community and planet.

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The Difference Between Pepitas & Pumpkin Seeds

What are pepitas, really? And are they any different from regular ol’ pumpkin seeds? Food writer Ali Slagle finds out.
I had this (not brilliant at all) idea to try to shell the pumpkin seeds that were being excavated from our many, many carved pumpkin…

What are pepitas, really? And are they any different from regular ol' pumpkin seeds? Food writer Ali Slagle finds out.

I had this (not brilliant at all) idea to try to shell the pumpkin seeds that were being excavated from our many, many carved pumpkins around the office—the thinking being that hulling the seeds would produce something more workable and multipurpose, namely pepitas (“little seed of squash” in Spanish). Because pepitas are shelled pumpkin seeds, right?

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