Kale & Farro Salad with Sourdough Breadcrumbs

This hearty kale salad is anything but boring: tossed with tangy lemon and flavorful pecorino cheese and topped with nutty farro, crunchy sourdough breadcrumbs, and tart dried barberries. The addition of nutritious farro makes this salad suitable as a meal unto itself, perfect for lunch or a light dinner, though it’s also lovely served as […]

The post Kale & Farro Salad with Sourdough Breadcrumbs first appeared on Love and Olive Oil.

This hearty kale salad is anything but boring: tossed with tangy lemon and flavorful pecorino cheese and topped with nutty farro, crunchy sourdough breadcrumbs, and tart dried barberries.

The addition of nutritious farro makes this salad suitable as a meal unto itself, perfect for lunch or a light dinner, though it’s also lovely served as a side salad alongside some grilled chicken or seared steak.

As our friend Richard used to say… it’s delicious AND nutritious!

Two dark gray bowls of Kale & Farro Salad with Sourdough Breadcrumbs on a dark gray background, loaf of sourdough bread in the background.

The base of this kale salad recipe comes from the Six Seasons cookbook, and it’s one we’ve made many, many times (it’s one of the few kale salad recipes I actually like).

While the original recipe is near perfect, we wanted to make it a bit more substantial and filling as a meal in and of itself, hence the addition of farro. We also used homemade sourdough for the breadcrumbs, added barberries, and tweaked the process a little bit (adding the cheese separately versus mixing it all together makes for more even distribution and less clumps). Also, twice as much cheese and garlic (as you do).

This recipe works with any kind of kale; the original calls for lacinato (the darker, dino-skin looking stuff); we used curly kale here since I love the texture and lift: it doesn’t collapse under the weight of the farro.

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Italian Rosemary Buns for a Sticky-Sweet Easter Treat

The Perfect Loaf is a column from software engineer-turned-bread expert (and Food52’s Resident Bread Baker), Maurizio Leo. Maurizio is here to show us all things naturally leavened, enriched, yeast-risen, you name it—basically, every vehicle to slather…

The Perfect Loaf is a column from software engineer-turned-bread expert (and Food52's Resident Bread Baker), Maurizio Leo. Maurizio is here to show us all things naturally leavened, enriched, yeast-risen, you name it—basically, every vehicle to slather on a lot of butter. Today, pan di ramerino, an Italian Easter-time sweet bun.


Pan di ramerino, or rosemary bread—a sticky and sweet little bun studded with raisins—is a traditional Easter-time treat commonly found in Tuscany, in the central part of Italy. They’re remarkable because they have an uncommon ingredient woven into an enriched dough: rosemary. While we often think of the woodsy, piney herb as a savory-only affair, it sometimes finds its way into the sweeter side of things. With these sweet buns, rosemary brings a gentle backdrop of savoriness that is unique, and its flavor is the highlight of these sticky and soft buns.

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This Sweet Yeasted Bread Is Perfect for Easter Brunch

The Perfect Loaf is a column from software engineer turned bread expert (and Food52’s Resident Bread Baker), Maurizio Leo. Maurizio is here to show us all things naturally leavened, enriched, yeast-risen, you name it—basically, anything you can slather…

The Perfect Loaf is a column from software engineer turned bread expert (and Food52's Resident Bread Baker), Maurizio Leo. Maurizio is here to show us all things naturally leavened, enriched, yeast-risen, you name it—basically, anything you can slather a lot of butter on. Today, he tells us about naturally leavened mazanec, a Czech sweet bread.


Many years ago I had the pleasure of traveling through Europe for work, with a multiweek stop in the Czech Republic. My hosts, knowing my appreciation for good food, took me to restaurants that catered to the locals and that were so small it felt like we were eating in their cousin’s kitchen. In these quaint eateries, I had some of the tastiest food of my entire trip. The highlight was probably eating a whole pork knuckle, but I also ordered plenty of dumplings and many a light beer. As I was traveling during the dead of winter, many spring and summer Czech specialties eluded me, including the Eastertime sweet bread called mazanec. This treat is not widely known here in the U.S., so I figured what better way to remember my trip through the beautiful Czech Republic than to fill the mazanec void and make it in my home kitchen—using my sourdough starter, of course.

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The Pancake-Crumpet Hybrid Your Breakfast Table Needs

The Perfect Loaf is a column from software engineer-turned-bread expert (and Food52’s Resident Bread Baker), Maurizio Leo. Maurizio is here to show us all things naturally leavened, enriched, yeast-risen, you name it—basically, every vehicle to slather…

The Perfect Loaf is a column from software engineer-turned-bread expert (and Food52's Resident Bread Baker), Maurizio Leo. Maurizio is here to show us all things naturally leavened, enriched, yeast-risen, you name it—basically, every vehicle to slather on a lot of butter. Today, pikelets made with sourdough starter discard.


Pikelets are small, round, griddle breads very reminiscent of pancakes or crumpets. They’re more common in Australia and the U.K., and are welcome anytime at my breakfast table. Their flavor is neither super-sweet nor savory, a middle ground amongst the syrup-drenched waffles and salty bacon, egg, and cheese sandwiches out there. In terms of texture, they’re more dense and sturdy than you might first think when seeing one (they do look a lot like fluffy American pancakes), but they’re still soft inside.

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I’m Here to Speak Out Against Subpar Bread

Four years ago, I walked into Oat Bakery in Santa Barbara, California, and tried fresh bread for what felt like the first time. I will never forget that bite—the pull of the crust, then the soft, slightly chewy interior with just enough give; a bit sal…

Four years ago, I walked into Oat Bakery in Santa Barbara, California, and tried fresh bread for what felt like the first time. I will never forget that bite—the pull of the crust, then the soft, slightly chewy interior with just enough give; a bit salty; somehow buttery, though there was no butter in sight. I was overwhelmed with flavor and texture. I asked for a list of ingredients because I could not believe that this was what bread could be. To my surprise, there were no gimmicks or tricks, just a few quality ingredients and attention to detail. This was my first foray into the bread world, and my first experience of bread at the bakery that soon became my second home.

A lot has changed since that first taste. For one, the experience of sampling before you buy is often nonexistent (thanks, COVID.) Plus, now it seems that practically everyone I meet is at least somewhat well versed in the art of bread making. (Remember the shelter-in-place sourdough craze of early 2020?) Not to mention that bread bakeries, old and new, are quickly becoming household names: People will go out of their way to hit Tartine while vacationing in San Francisco; Los Angeles’s La Brea can be found in supermarkets from coast to coast; New York’s Bread Alone now stocks loaves in supermarkets and grocery delivery services around the tristate area. It seems that the not-at-all-novel concept of enjoying fresh bread regularly has taken the world by storm these past few years. Yet I still find myself surrounded by underwhelming bread.

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How to make a Sourdough Starter

Intro to Sourdough Starter What is the point of a sourdough starter? Sourdough starter is a culture of ‘wild’ bacteria and yeasts which are grown on a mixture of flour & water. They digest the nutrients in the flour by fermentation, pro…

Intro to Sourdough Starter What is the point of a sourdough starter? Sourdough starter is a culture of ‘wild’ bacteria and yeasts which are grown on a mixture of flour & water. They digest the nutrients in the flour by fermentation, producing by-products such as lactic acid, acetic acid and carbon dioxide. The acid produced …

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The post How to make a Sourdough Starter appeared first on Izy Hossack - Top With Cinnamon.

If You Love Cinnamon Buns, You’ll Really Love Kanelstang

The Perfect Loaf is a column from software engineer turned bread expert (and Food52’s Resident Bread Baker) Maurizio Leo. Maurizio is here to show us all things naturally leavened, enriched, yeast-risen, you name it—basically, every vehicle to slather …

The Perfect Loaf is a column from software engineer turned bread expert (and Food52's Resident Bread Baker) Maurizio Leo. Maurizio is here to show us all things naturally leavened, enriched, yeast-risen, you name it—basically, every vehicle to slather a lot of butter on. Today, a sourdough version of Danish kanelstang.


If you’ve ever baked pain d’épi, which is a classic French baguette made to look like a stalk of wheat, you’re familiar with the charm of rolling, snipping, and twisting, yielding a baked good that livens up any dinner table. Instead of scoring the dough with a razor blade and letting it rise straight up, the bread is cut with scissors into alternating petals. The Danish kanelstang (which translates to “cinnamon stick”) has the same vibe as the pain d'épi, but just filled with sugar, butter, and warm spices. Think American-style sweet cinnamon roll with fancy French shaping—a mix of flavor and aesthetic that’s perfect for a morning or afternoon treat.

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Excellent Gluten-Free Sourdough Bread Is Possible—in Just 5 Easy Steps

Just as appetites are growing for ancient wheat flours like spelt, Kamut, and einkorn, so too is consumer demand for naturally gluten-free flours like buckwheat, sorghum, and teff—albeit a bit more slowly. Little by little, whether they have gluten int…

Just as appetites are growing for ancient wheat flours like spelt, Kamut, and einkorn, so too is consumer demand for naturally gluten-free flours like buckwheat, sorghum, and teff—albeit a bit more slowly. Little by little, whether they have gluten intolerances or not, bakers are beginning to appreciate the unique flavors presented by gluten-free alternatives. The result? Tastier loaves of gluten-free bread.

1. Stock Up on "Short" & "Long" Flours

“Gluten-free isn’t a fad diet, and it isn’t a diet that lacks,” said Naomi Devlin, the U.K.-based author of River Cottage Gluten Free. “It potentially could be a diet that has a lot more flavor and diversity in it.” Despite being seemingly everywhere, gluten is found only in three cereals: barley, wheat, and rye (plus hybrids like triticale). On the other hand, gluten-free grains and cereals are far more numerous: buckwheat, teff, millet, corn, sorghum, rice, lentil, chickpea, almond, quinoa, amaranth—the list goes on.

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The Case for Making Whole-Wheat Pizza Dough

The Perfect Loaf is a column from software engineer turned bread expert (and Food52’s Resident Bread Baker) Maurizio Leo. Maurizio is here to show us all things naturally leavened, enriched, yeast-risen, you name it—basically, every vehicle to slather …

The Perfect Loaf is a column from software engineer turned bread expert (and Food52's Resident Bread Baker) Maurizio Leo. Maurizio is here to show us all things naturally leavened, enriched, yeast-risen, you name it—basically, every vehicle to slather on a lot of butter. Today, he’s discussing the pros and cons of whole-wheat pizza dough.


The longer I bake bread and cook pizza, the more I find I like increasing the whole-grain percentage in the dough. Sure, there’s an undeniable charm that comes with the classic Italian way: a 00-flour-based pizza that’s cooked at a super-high temperature, resulting in an exceedingly soft texture, tall rise, and open, airy crust. And while my sourdough bread almost always has some whole-grain component, lately, I’ve been pushing the whole grains in my naturally leavened pizza dough as well. Swapping out some white flour is an easy way to bring flavor to the next level: The added bran and germ mixed into the dough brings deeper grain flavors (read: nutty, earthy, and a touch of minerality), and when coupled with lengthy natural fermentation, you get a one-two punch of flavor and nutrition.

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Sourdough Cider Doughnuts Put Everyone in the Fall Spirit

The Perfect Loaf is a column from software engineer turned bread expert (and Food52’s Resident Bread Baker) Maurizio Leo. Maurizio is here to show us all things naturally leavened, enriched, yeast-risen, you name it—basically, every vehicle to slather …

The Perfect Loaf is a column from software engineer turned bread expert (and Food52's Resident Bread Baker) Maurizio Leo. Maurizio is here to show us all things naturally leavened, enriched, yeast-risen, you name it—basically, every vehicle to slather a lot of butter on. Today, he’s discussing how to make one of fall’s finest apple cider doughnuts.


As a kid, I remember my grandfather would wake up every morning at 5 a.m. sharp. His destination was always the same: a local doughnut shop for a single glazed doughnut and a cup of piping-hot black coffee. I’d sometimes wake at the same time and wonder what the draw was. I mean, sure, doughnuts are great, but that’s just too early for anything. Now that I’m older, I realize the ritual of something sweet in the morning with your coffee makes for a beautiful way to get the day started. Your whole day is already filled with tasks and chores and meetings, but that bit of time in the morning is sacred, and a fabulous doughnut in hand makes it doubly so.

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