15 Space-Saving Products to Help Keep Your Kitchen & Pantry Organized

This post contains products independently chosen (and loved) by our editors and writers. Food52 earns an affiliate commission on qualifying purchases of the products we link to.

The new year is here (that’s right, it’s somehow 2023), and with it co…

This post contains products independently chosen (and loved) by our editors and writers. Food52 earns an affiliate commission on qualifying purchases of the products we link to.

The new year is here (that’s right, it’s somehow 2023), and with it comes a general desire to refresh. For some, that refresh is more conceptual: making resolutions, setting intentions, and building In/Out lists for the upcoming year. But for others, the refresh is literal: cleaning your home, replacing old sheets, and decluttering.

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5 Reasons I Don’t Want a Bigger Home

When I set out to write a book about small spaces, I wanted to find people like myself who had chosen to live in a smaller space (not ones who were forced to by circumstance). I was just as curious about why people were living small as I was about how …

When I set out to write a book about small spaces, I wanted to find people like myself who had chosen to live in a smaller space (not ones who were forced to by circumstance). I was just as curious about why people were living small as I was about how they made it work. My own family could have stretched our budget to get a bigger apartment or we could have moved out to the ‘burbs, but we made a conscious choice to buy a smaller place close to where we work. We wanted to stay in the city we love, minimize our commutes, and keep our costs and stress low. As the years have gone by, I realized I don’t really want a bigger home. Here’s why I think my family will be living small for the long haul; maybe my reasons will help you see your small space in a new light:

Photo by Laura Fenton

1. A small home keeps our costs low

Every time my husband and I start talking about looking for a bigger apartment, we quickly conclude that we don’t want to spend any more money on housing than we already do. Living small has given us financial freedom. We’re not alone in our thinking: When my book came out it was the very first weeks of the pandemic. I checked in with the individuals and families featured in my book to see how they were feeling about their small spaces now that they were spending all their time in them. Again and again, they told me they were so grateful to have rent and mortgage payments that they knew they could handle even in uncertain times. My husband and I both found ourselves temporarily unemployed and were so grateful our monthly nut was low (and that we had savings because we hadn’t been spending every penny on a bigger mortgage).

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12 Uber-Organized Linen Closets That Will Inspire You to Tidy Up

I’ve always struggled to keep my linen closet organized. It always starts out with neat stacks of sheets and towels, but then I’ll pull my favorite pieces from the bottom of a pile or knock over the neatly folded linens. Within a week or two, all sembl…

I’ve always struggled to keep my linen closet organized. It always starts out with neat stacks of sheets and towels, but then I’ll pull my favorite pieces from the bottom of a pile or knock over the neatly folded linens. Within a week or two, all semblance of organization has gone out the window, and it will usually stay messy (and frustrating) for a few months until I pull everything out and start all over again.

To break the never-ending cycle, I went searching for the internet’s best organization tips, and I found lots of different ideas that will help even the messiest people (a.k.a. me) keep their linens neat and tidy. Here are some of the best linen closet organization tips that came up in my search.

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How to Make a Small Living Room Work Extra, Extra Hard

No Space Too Small is a column by Laura Fenton that celebrates the idea that you can live well in a small home. Each month, Laura will share her practical findings from years of observing how people live in tight spaces, and her own everyday experience…

No Space Too Small is a column by Laura Fenton that celebrates the idea that you can live well in a small home. Each month, Laura will share her practical findings from years of observing how people live in tight spaces, and her own everyday experiences of living small—from the hunt for the perfect tiny desk to how to manage everyday clutter.


I’ve lived in eight different apartments since I arrived in New York City more than twenty years ago, and they’ve all been variations of small, tiny, miniscule, or petite. In one studio, my bedroom, living room, dining space, and kitchen were all crammed into less than 200 square feet. Through it all, I’ve learned how to make small living spaces serve multiple functions—without feeling cramped.

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The Smartest Beds for the Smallest Spaces

No Space Too Small is a column by Laura Fenton that celebrates the idea that you can live well in a small home. Each month, Laura will share her practical findings from years of observing how people live in tight spaces, and her own everyday experience…

No Space Too Small is a column by Laura Fenton that celebrates the idea that you can live well in a small home. Each month, Laura will share her practical findings from years of observing how people live in tight spaces, and her own everyday experiences of living small—from the hunt for the perfect tiny desk to how to manage everyday clutter.


Quick: Where will you find the biggest small-space win? In the kitchen? A closet system? Some genius home-office hack? Take a look around your home—whether that’s a studio apartment or a luxe four-bedroom—and ask yourself: What piece of furnishing takes up the most real estate within your four walls?

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Winter Clothes Begone! Here’s How to Store ’Em Properly.

By the time the temperatures rise and the sun begins to set later in the evening, one thing is true: You’re about this close to chucking your winter coat out a window. After months of putting it on, taking it off, and essentially lugging it everywhere,…

By the time the temperatures rise and the sun begins to set later in the evening, one thing is true: You’re about this close to chucking your winter coat out a window. After months of putting it on, taking it off, and essentially lugging it everywhere, you’re more than ready to not lay eyes on it again until Thanksgiving. And while no one would blame you if it somehow went missing, there’s a better way to go about transitioning out of your cold-weather wardrobe: proper storage.

“If you live in a climate that has big seasonal shifts, storing out-of-season clothing will create more breathing room in your closet and make it easy to get dressed with ease—who wants to wrestle through an avalanche of heavy coats and sweaters to find their favorite summer dress?,” says Shira Gill, organizing expert and author of Minimalista. “Relocating out-of-season clothing and accessories will enable you to get dressed in a snap without hunting for the items you need for the current climate.”

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How Two Editors Finally Tackled Their Least-Organized Spots

When my husband and I moved into a house in the ‘burbs, we were astounded at just how much space we suddenly had…until we filled it up with enough cleaning products and power tools to start our own general store, and had no idea how to organize them. I…

When my husband and I moved into a house in the ‘burbs, we were astounded at just how much space we suddenly had…until we filled it up with enough cleaning products and power tools to start our own general store, and had no idea how to organize them. It doesn’t help that as a market editor, my job involves a lot of hands-on testing and learning about new-to-me brands—which means a revolving door of products at my literal door.

Home52’s senior content lead, Arati Menon, has a different kind of problem: not enough storage space. While living in an apartment in New York hasn’t (yet) taught her to be a minimalist, it has turned her into a bit of an expert at finding storage where there is none. Still, there remain quirks (and messes!) in her space that need additional wrangling.

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The Closet Organization Trend I Just Can’t Get Behind

When it comes to my home, experimentation is the name of the game. There’s rarely a trend I won’t try, a DIY I won’t take on, or a product I won’t give a shot. I’m firmly in the camp of “you never know until you try” and, honestly, some of my favorite …

When it comes to my home, experimentation is the name of the game. There’s rarely a trend I won’t try, a DIY I won’t take on, or a product I won’t give a shot. I’m firmly in the camp of “you never know until you try” and, honestly, some of my favorite decor moments have been born of this experimental attitude (case in point: tiling my kitchen backsplash solo—without ever having tiled before in my life).

That being said, there is one trend blowing up lately that I just can’t muster the enthusiasm for: color-coded closets. I know, I know—they’re all over TikTok and Instagram, and they look great there. We can probably credit Clea and Joanna from The Home Edit at least partially for the renewed interest in rainbow-hued organization—the duo are basically the Patron Saints of calming chaos by color-coding (just peep their Instagram feed!), and season two of their Netflix series hits April 1, so there’s been a lot of buzz around beautiful ways to corral your closet lately.

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How to Get Your Spice Cabinet in Order—& Keep it That Way

A few weeks ago, I was making a loaf of cinnamon raisin bread in my bread maker, and as I was dumping ingredients into the pan, I came to the jarring realization that I had no cinnamon! Kind of a big oversight. The recipe had already started, so I sent…

A few weeks ago, I was making a loaf of cinnamon raisin bread in my bread maker, and as I was dumping ingredients into the pan, I came to the jarring realization that I had no cinnamon! Kind of a big oversight. The recipe had already started, so I sent my boyfriend on an urgent trip to the store to get some, but the next day, I was digging around in the back of a kitchen drawer, and what do you think I found? Yup, a bottle of unopened cinnamon. Oops!

All that to say, my spice collection could definitely use some organization—and likely a good purge. It’s definitely going to be on my spring cleaning agenda, and if you’re planning to do the same, here’s how to clean, sort, and store your spice cabinet like a pro.

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8 Clever Ways to Conceal an Unsightly Wireless Router

Technology, for better or for worse, has become an integral part of every home. TVs, smart hubs, printers, charging cords—it’s everywhere, all the time, and it’s not always pretty. Personally, I prefer to camouflage as much tech as possible. For exampl…

Technology, for better or for worse, has become an integral part of every home. TVs, smart hubs, printers, charging cords—it’s everywhere, all the time, and it’s not always pretty. Personally, I prefer to camouflage as much tech as possible. For example, I made a decorative frame for my TV and have it programmed to display landscape art when not in use. The wireless router is no different—I want it hidden. As of now it’s inside a basket that’s also filled with dog toys, which is not ideal. So, I started doing some research about how to better hide it, and thought: why not share my findings?

Of course, there are some things to consider when hiding a router. The manufacturer (and any tech dad, like my own) would tell you that hiding it is a bad idea. If you look at the router you’ll see that there are likely vents on multiple sides, which allow air to pass through and keep the machine cool. Obstructing the vents can cause the router to overheat, which can either a. damage what’s around it or b. damage the router itself. The other main issue with hiding a router is that blocking it with anything can dampen the signal strength, so you’ll want to choose something that allows air and a Wi-Fi signal to pass through.

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