How Much Brisket Do I Need Per Person?

If you want to know how much brisket you need to serve per person, you first need to watch Mean Girls (or, if you’re a woman between the ages of 25 and 35, re-watch for the 100th time). The answer lies with the protagonist character Cady Heron, played…

If you want to know how much brisket you need to serve per person, you first need to watch Mean Girls (or, if you’re a woman between the ages of 25 and 35, re-watch for the 100th time). The answer lies with the protagonist character Cady Heron, played by Lindsey Lohan, who will tell you “the limit does not exist.” I understand this doesn’t help you determine how many pounds of raw brisket to purchase from the butcher before Passover or Rosh Hashanah. But it’s true. If your brisket is fork-tender and flavorful beyond belief, people will keep going back for more. And even when they retire from the dinner table to the couch and change from fancy clothes to sweatpants, a few people will obviously be craving leftover brisket within (checks watch) 90 minutes. But yes, we do have a handy way of estimating how much you should allot per person if your budget is not infinite.

Types of Beef Brisket

When shopping for brisket, you’ll find that there are two common cuts of meat: brisket flat (aka first-cut) and brisket point. Many brisket recipes won’t specify which cut of meat to use, so here’s what to know: brisket point has a jagged, pointy end that is ideal for pulled brisket (like these braised brisket sandwiches or chopped brisket. Flat cut brisket is what you want to use if you’re planning to braise or smoke brisket and then slice it into neat servings. Flat cut, or first-cut brisket, is a leaner cut, which means it’s at its best when cooked for several hours until it becomes juicy and tender.

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How to Make Noodle Kugel Without a Recipe

Here at Food52, we love recipes—but do we always use them? Of course not. Because once you realize you don’t always need a recipe, you’ll make your favorite dishes a lot more often.
Today: Whether you grew up on your bubbe’s kugel or yo…

Here at Food52, we love recipes—but do we always use them? Of course not. Because once you realize you don't always need a recipe, you'll make your favorite dishes a lot more often.

Today: Whether you grew up on your bubbe's kugel or you have no idea what kugel is, you can (and should) make a perfectly sweet, family-friendly casserole that will have you noshing in no time.

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Babka’s Disputed, Delicious Origin Story

The babka I grew up with was bad. It was dry and crumbly and full of trans fat. It came from a grocery store in the same suburban strip mall as my orthodontist Dr. Diamond’s office and, in our household, counted only my parents as fans. I never would’v…

The babka I grew up with was bad. It was dry and crumbly and full of trans fat. It came from a grocery store in the same suburban strip mall as my orthodontist Dr. Diamond's office and, in our household, counted only my parents as fans. I never would've dreamt of sharing a photo of it—all stale and nubby next to the bagels on the top shelf our fridge—on Instagram.

Today's babkas, however, are runway models and pageview guarantors. They're one part buttery dough, one part chocolate chunks, and one part air. They're twisted, striated, and marbled; streusel-topped, syrup-soaked, and ice cream sandwich'd. They're plastered all over the Internet, the starlets of Smitten Kitchen (2007 and 2014), Bon Appétit (2016), Food and Wine (2016), The New York Times (2016), and our very own Food52 (also 2016).

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I’m Jewish and Vegan. Here’s How I Celebrate Rosh Hashanah

“Judaism right from the get go was supposed to be a vegetarian—or you could even say vegan—religion.”

Jeffrey Cohan does not mince words, or meat, or any animal byproduct, for that matter. He is the Executive Director of Jewish Veg, an advocacy organi…

“Judaism right from the get go was supposed to be a vegetarian—or you could even say vegan—religion.”

Jeffrey Cohan does not mince words, or meat, or any animal byproduct, for that matter. He is the Executive Director of Jewish Veg, an advocacy organization that provides support and community for people who are both Jewish and vegan. I quiver at his confidence.

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13 Celebratory Chicken Recipes for Rosh Hashanah

I grew up a Korean-American Presbyterian girl in New York’s lower Westchester county, in a town that was predominantly Irish and Italian-Catholic, but was also home to many Jewish-American families. I will always credit my best friend, Liz, who lived n…

I grew up a Korean-American Presbyterian girl in New York’s lower Westchester county, in a town that was predominantly Irish and Italian-Catholic, but was also home to many Jewish-American families. I will always credit my best friend, Liz, who lived next door, for being my gateway into a lifelong exposure of Jewish culture: lighting candles on Hanukkah; accompanying her to temple where we’d chase each other (instead of her going to class); cracking up over Mel Brooks movies on our sleepovers; her trying to teach me to read Hebrew; and how my first teaching job out of college was at a Hassidic preschool in Stamford, Connecticut.

As Morah Caroline, I taught children how to make challah, led brachas before meals, and kept Kosher in my professional life (while downing non-kosher everythings at her nearby apartment after work). The memories of being an “honorary member” of a Jewish family remain truly some of my happiest, and still make for the best times as an adult, right down to having a hora at my Korean-Presbyterian-Taiwanese-Colombian-Catholic wedding!

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The Righteousness of Pomegranate on Rosh Hashanah

Apples and honey may be the ingredients most commonly associated with Rosh Hashanah, the Jewish new year celebration—they bid sweet tidings for the coming months. Indeed, every year, as summer draws to a close (on the first day of the seventh month in …

Apples and honey may be the ingredients most commonly associated with Rosh Hashanah, the Jewish new year celebration—they bid sweet tidings for the coming months. Indeed, every year, as summer draws to a close (on the first day of the seventh month in the Hebrew calendar), my family drizzles honey on pillowy challah and slices into sugar-dusted apple cake.

But pomegranate is just as significant.

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46 Celebratory Recipes to Make for Rosh Hashanah This Year

Rosh Hashanah, the Jewish New Year, is a time to reflect on the past year—and look forward to the coming one.

The holiday’s celebratory meal can include favorites like yeasty challah, matzo ball soup, and apples dipped in honey. What do these things h…

Rosh Hashanah, the Jewish New Year, is a time to reflect on the past year—and look forward to the coming one.

The holiday's celebratory meal can include favorites like yeasty challah, matzo ball soup, and apples dipped in honey. What do these things have in common? Their friendly circular shape, which symbolizes the ongoing nature of time, the round-and-round-ness of the year. Similarly, sweet foods are favored for a sweet new year.

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The Best Recipe for a Tender Brisket, According to a Butcher

Whether you’re celebrating Passover or Rosh Hashanah, having a backyard BBQ or just gathering with friends on a Sunday, a simple beef brisket recipe can be the perfect way to feed a crowd. With a side of mashed potatoes or a lightly dressed green salad…

Whether you're celebrating Passover or Rosh Hashanah, having a backyard BBQ or just gathering with friends on a Sunday, a simple beef brisket recipe can be the perfect way to feed a crowd. With a side of mashed potatoes or a lightly dressed green salad, a wine-braised brisket in the oven, cooked until fork tender, can be the ultimate comfort food. Here's how to make the best beef brisket—with a few tips and tricks to get you there with flying colors.


There are a handful of cooking firsts that stand out clearly in my brain amongst the daily fog of cold cereal and potato chip sandwiches. One is the first meal I ever made for my family: buttered spaghetti with boiled potatoes. There's also the first time I ever perfectly poached an egg: I was in college working in a restaurant kitchen under the tutelage of a crush, and I was cooking on an induction burner.

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