Creamy Mango Gelatin (Gelatina de Mango)

Inside: This creamy mango gelatin is a perfect dessert for any time of year that will have you and your guests asking for more. Mexico may be more known for …

The post Creamy Mango Gelatin (Gelatina de Mango) appeared first on My Latina Table.

Inside: This creamy mango gelatin is a perfect dessert for any time of year that will have you and your guests asking for more.

mango gelatina before being cut

Mexico may be more known for its antojitos, like tacos, tostadas, empanadas, and more, but we also have some tasty desserts! Today I am going to share with you one of my favorite desserts, which is mango gelatina, made with fresh mangoes and also includes cream cheese to give it an even creamier texture.

Making homemade gelatin is really pretty simple, and there are many different combinations and ways to do it. Of course you can just buy the pre-flavored packets at the store, but making everything from scratch is an even better way to do it. I personally prefer to make this tasty mango dessert and others from home, especially on a hot day where the whole family is craving something sweet and delicious.

What is Mango Gelatin?

Mango gelatin, or in Spanish, Gelatina de Mango, is creamy, sweet, and a favorite dessert in my family. It is best when you can use ripe mangoes since they tend to be sweeter which will result in a better end result for this recipe. Gelatin in general is a favorite among children, and my kids are no exception. Whenever I make any variety, they gobble it up as fast as they can, but the mango flavor is always one of their favorites.

mango gelatin with a slice taken out

This tasty dessert is easy to make and won’t cost a lot of money either, so it is a perfect option for any family.

How do you make Mango Gelatin?

Like I said above, this recipe is easy to make and uses simple ingredients. You will need the following to get started:

  • Large, ripe mangoes (manila or ataulfo work great)
  • Whole Milk
  • Evaporated Milk
  • Sweetened condensed milk
  • Mexican crema
  • Cream cheese
  • Unflavored gelatin powder
  • warm water

Mango gelatin with other ingredients

Once you have gathered the ingredients, you will need to follow the instructions below.

First, you will need to sprinkle gelatin in the water and mix well to dissolve the gelatin powder. Let sit for about 15 minutes.

Next, peel the mangoes and cut the mango into medium-sized mango cubes. Add them to your blender or food processor with the whole milk and blend until it reaches a somewhat thick consistency.

Add the above mixture to a medium sized pan and and heat over medium heat, stirring often and not allowing it to boil. After about 5 minutes, lower to the lowest heat possible.

The next step is to heat the previously prepared gelatin mixture in the microwave for about 30 seconds so that it returns to a liquid state. Add to the pan with the fresh mango purée and mix well until completely disssolved. Remove from heat and let cool.

The final step is to blend the cream cheese, evaporated milk, crema, and sweetended condensed milk in a blender, adding that mixture to the mango mixture and stirring well. Add this to the gelatin mold of your choice and refrigerate for a minimum of 3-4 hours.

Check out these other desserts!

mango gelatina before being cut
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Creamy Mango Gelatin

This creamy mango gelatin is a perfect dessert for any time of year that will have you and your guests asking for more.
Course Dessert
Cuisine Mexican
Keyword dessert, gelatin, gelatina, mango, postre
Prep Time 30 minutes
Refrigeration Time 4 hours
Total Time 4 hours 30 minutes
Servings 10 Slices
Calories 246kcal

Ingredients

  • 4 Ripe Mangoes
  • 1/2 Cup Whole Milk
  • 1 Can Evaporated Milk 14 oz
  • 1 Can Condensed Milk 14 oz
  • 1 Can Table Cream Crema Mexicana 8 oz
  • 1 box Cream Cheese 8 oz
  • 10 tsp Unflavored Gelatin
  • 1/2 Cup water

Instructions

  • Sprinkle the unflavored gelatin into the water in a bowl and stir well. Let rest for 15 minutes.
  • Peel the mangoes and cut them into medium sized cubes.
  • Add the mangoes to a blender with the whole milk and blend. The consistency will be a bit thick.
  • Add the above mango mixture to a medium sized pan and heat over medium heat for about 5 minutes, not allowing it to boil. After 5 minutes have passed, lower heat to the lowest possible setting.
  • Put the bowl with the unflavored gelatin mixture in the microwave for about 30 seconds to return it to a liquid state.
  • Add the gelatin mixture to the mango mixture in the pan and stir until dissolved. Remove from heat and allow to cool.
  • Blend the cream cheese, evaporated milk, condensed milk, and table cream in a blender.
  • Add the above mixture to the mango mixture and stir well. Place in a large bundt pan and refrigerate for a minimum of 3-4 hours.

Nutrition

Serving: 1Slice | Calories: 246kcal | Carbohydrates: 38g | Protein: 10g | Fat: 7g | Saturated Fat: 4g | Polyunsaturated Fat: 0.3g | Monounsaturated Fat: 2g | Cholesterol: 25mg | Sodium: 102mg | Potassium: 412mg | Fiber: 1g | Sugar: 37g | Vitamin A: 1108IU | Vitamin C: 32mg | Calcium: 232mg | Iron: 0.3mg

 

 

The post Creamy Mango Gelatin (Gelatina de Mango) appeared first on My Latina Table.

Madeleine Kamman’s White Chocolate-Chartreuse Bavarian

I don’t remember the first time I made this dessert, but I certainly remember being wowed by its flavors, and the creator of it, Madeleine Kamman. (Who I’ll get to in a minute…) I’d been making it for years and it’s a wonderful way to use white chocolate, which pairs remarkably well with dark chocolate, but also goes nicely with everything from berries and lemon,…

I don’t remember the first time I made this dessert, but I certainly remember being wowed by its flavors, and the creator of it, Madeleine Kamman. (Who I’ll get to in a minute…) I’d been making it for years and it’s a wonderful way to use white chocolate, which pairs remarkably well with dark chocolate, but also goes nicely with everything from berries and lemon, and caramelizes beautifully, which can be used in cakes, sorbets, and ice cream. (I learned how to make it at the Valrhona Chocolate School, and it’s become so popular that the company now sells it by the bar.)

What can’t white chocolate do?

Well, it can’t replace chocolate because it’s not chocolate. Milk chocolate technically isn’t chocolate; it’s chocolate with milk added. On a similar note, I’ve only had Home Fries served to me at diners, not at home. And I’m still perplexed that we call it Banana Bread, because some people have told me that Cornbread, if made with a few teaspoons of sugar, isn’t bread, it’s cake. Yes, some insist that white chocolate “…isn’t chocolate!” but herb tea, as it’s commonly called in the U.S., has no tea in it. So if you’ve ever sipped a cup of “chamomile tea” (or even if you haven’t), you are welcome to enjoy white chocolate!

Continue Reading Madeleine Kamman’s White Chocolate-Chartreuse Bavarian...

Chocolate Covered Strawberry Mousse Cakes

There are few things as perfect as a simple chocolate dipped strawberry, and these impressive little entremet cakes transform that classic pairing into a chocolate covered dome of delight, with a luscious strawberry mousse and rich chocolate brownie core. Featuring a cloud-like strawberry mousse and a square of fudgy chocolate brownie, all covered with a […]

The post Chocolate Covered Strawberry Mousse Cakes first appeared on Love and Olive Oil.

There are few things as perfect as a simple chocolate dipped strawberry, and these impressive little entremet cakes transform that classic pairing into a chocolate covered dome of delight, with a luscious strawberry mousse and rich chocolate brownie core.

Featuring a cloud-like strawberry mousse and a square of fudgy chocolate brownie, all covered with a glossy chocolate ganache glaze, these little mousse cakes are as stunning as they are delicious. While entremet-style desserts do require a bit of effort and planning, the work is easily manageable when split over a few days.

Three domes covered in ganache, on a white plate, pink background

My blueberry mousse cake recipe is surprisingly popular given its complexity; and I’m giddy with delight every time I’m tagged in a photo by someone who’s made them.

This recipe is a similar entremet-style dessert, but with different components: a rich chocolate brownie instead of the almond sponge, a light strawberry Bavarian mousse (distinctive in its use of egg yolks in the base), and then a chocolate ganache coating instead of the mirror glaze.

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Coffee Caramel Panna Cotta

Two of my favorite flavors come together right here, in this Coffee Caramel Panna Cotta, which offers up the rich flavor of caramel with a few strong shots of espresso. I seem to have good caramel karma and when I baked professionally, the executive pastry chef at one restaurant told me that I was the one she wanted to make the caramel desserts since I…

Two of my favorite flavors come together right here, in this Coffee Caramel Panna Cotta, which offers up the rich flavor of caramel with a few strong shots of espresso. I seem to have good caramel karma and when I baked professionally, the executive pastry chef at one restaurant told me that I was the one she wanted to make the caramel desserts since I had a knack for getting caramel just right.

Continue Reading Coffee Caramel Panna Cotta...

Mirror Glaze Christmas Ornament Cakes

Pretty on the outside, stunning on the inside: these festive Christmas ornament entremet cakes feature flavors of chocolate and caramel enrobed in a shiny red mirror glaze. Entremet cakes are a labor of love, but the final result is downright impressive. This holiday variation incorporates a crunchy chocolate pecan crust, gooey salted caramel, creamy chocolate […]

Pretty on the outside, stunning on the inside: these festive Christmas ornament entremet cakes feature flavors of chocolate and caramel enrobed in a shiny red mirror glaze.

Entremet cakes are a labor of love, but the final result is downright impressive. This holiday variation incorporates a crunchy chocolate pecan crust, gooey salted caramel, creamy chocolate crémeux and a cloud-like caramel mousse.

Two red mirror-glazed cakes decorated to look like Christmas ornaments, on white plates with gold forks and fairy lights in the background.

For the last two weeks I’ve been completely and utterly consumed by this recipe. (That said, I’ve already consumed two of the finished cakes myself, so… I’d call it even in the end.)

Entremet cakes by nature have many different layers and components, and I found myself with a serious case of choice paralysis: there were simply too many options and I just couldn’t decide. I spent hours scouring the internet and pastry cookbooks, considering a multitude of options for different flavors, textures and techniques; my obsessive thoughts even finding their way into my dreams (if you’ve never had OCD recipe development dreams, are you even a food blogger?)

Three red mirror-glazed Christmas ornament cakes on a white rectangle plate with a bowl of Rolo candies and fairy lights in the background.

I knew I wanted a combination of chocolate and caramel flavors to go with the Rolo candies I’d be using for the ornament topper. But that was really the only thing I had definitively decided.

But should I do a chocolate mousse and a caramel crémeux, or a caramel mousse and a chocolate crémeux?

How about a caramel-chocolate ganache or a chocolate-caramel sauce or a regular salted caramel? s

Should the base be soft sponge cake or chocolate cookie or crispy sable crust?

Should I mold the insides as domes or should I cut out rounds?

Well…

Now you see what I mean by choice paralysis?

Eventually, after testing a few components separately, I decided on a crunchy chocolate pecan cookie crust, a center of rich chocolate crémeux, a layer of simple salted caramel, and then a salted caramel and caramelized white chocolate mousse for the outer layer.

Yes, I probably obsessed over the details a bit too much, because, really, how can you go wrong with anything chocolate and caramel?

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