How to Cook a Spiral Ham (& Enjoy It for Days)

Spiral sliced ham is, in fact, an American invention. Harry Hoenselaar, the founder of the HoneyBaked Ham Company, built the world’s first spiral slicing machine in 1924. The idea, he said, had come to him in a dream, and his prototype was assembled fr…

Spiral sliced ham is, in fact, an American invention. Harry Hoenselaar, the founder of the HoneyBaked Ham Company, built the world's first spiral slicing machine in 1924. The idea, he said, had come to him in a dream, and his prototype was assembled from "a tire jack, a pie tin, a washing machine motor, and a knife." If you're as enamored by the idea of this gorgeous meat helix as we are and wondering how to cook a spiral ham at home, you've come to the right place. Let's cut the fat, and get right down to the bone of how to treat your ham right, so you and your guests can properly feast on this succulent American classic.

What Is A Spiral Ham?

A spiral ham is, in a nutshell, a bone-in ham that's been sliced with a special spiral-slicing machine, which carves the meat into perfectly thin slices while allowing it to retain its show-stopping centerpiece shape for optimal presentation. All spiral sliced hams are pre-cooked, so there is actually no need to cook a spiral ham—it's ready to eat. Nonetheless, there are two additional steps to take in order to get the most enjoyment out of your ham: heating and glazing.

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34 Spring-tastic Easter Cake Recipes

After a satisfying Easter brunch or dinner, the kids will likely steal away to a corner of the house, peeling open piece after piece of candy. But what about the adults? As with any good holiday meal, it’s important to end Easter on a sweet, special no…

After a satisfying Easter brunch or dinner, the kids will likely steal away to a corner of the house, peeling open piece after piece of candy. But what about the adults? As with any good holiday meal, it’s important to end Easter on a sweet, special note. Our 34 favorite Easter cake recipes featuring beautiful pastels and family-favorite springtime flavors will draw everyone back to the table.

1. Caroline's Carrot Cake

Carrot cake is a popular choice for Easter thanks to the Easter bunny connection, but it’s also a flat-out delicious dessert that should be served year-round. This multi-layer version is everything a cake should be without too much fuss.

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Take Your Holiday Decor to the Next Level

This story appeared in Serendipity Magazine’s October/November 2020 issue, and we’re excited to share it with our readers on Food52.

“Mom is a trailblazer,” says Andrea Sinkin, president of Andrea Sinkin Design in Greenwich, CT, of her mot…

This story appeared in Serendipity Magazine's October/November 2020 issue, and we're excited to share it with our readers on Food52.


“Mom is a trailblazer,” says Andrea Sinkin, president of Andrea Sinkin Design in Greenwich, CT, of her mother, Beverly, an interior designer for more than 40 years. “She is very modest and keeps no social media profile, but with her book of business, her name speaks for itself, so it’s not needed.” And Beverly, who is at the helm of Beverly Sinkin Design, has spent decades honing her style as she designed estates, hospitals and NYC office spaces.

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How to Light a Christmas Pudding on Fire (Because Why Not?)

To an American palate, Christmas pudding may taste like a yummy, gooey, extra-rich fruitcake (in a good way) that’s slathered with hard sauce (which ensures that you will like it even if you don’t care for fruitcake) and eaten with a spoon.
This is on…

To an American palate, Christmas pudding may taste like a yummy, gooey, extra-rich fruitcake (in a good way) that's slathered with hard sauce (which ensures that you will like it even if you don’t care for fruitcake) and eaten with a spoon.

This is one family’s version of a traditional English Christmas pudding, famously carried to the table in flames with a sprig of holly on top. It's studded with dried fruit—three kinds of raisins, plus prunes—along with chopped fresh apples and almonds, bread crumbs, grated suet (raw beef fat), stout, and brandy. A little flour and a couple of eggs hold it all together.

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16 Creative Ways to Use Leftover Cornbread (Other Than Stuffing)

Cornbread, warm, right out of the oven: It’s something we find ourselves eagerly cutting off squares of and eating straight from the pan, with a knifeful of soft butter for slathering onto each bite. It goes wonderfully with summer BBQs and Thanksgivin…

Cornbread, warm, right out of the oven: It's something we find ourselves eagerly cutting off squares of and eating straight from the pan, with a knifeful of soft butter for slathering onto each bite. It goes wonderfully with summer BBQs and Thanksgiving dinners alike. But no matter what time of year we make it, it all too soon it becomes a very different, much less joyous affair—bordering on tasteless, dry, and crumbly. What a shame. 

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How to Make Fresh Or Dried Bread Crumbs

Before Food Editor Emma Laperruque’s recipe for Pecorino Dumplings, my relationship with bread crumbs (whether store-bought or homemade, fresh or dried, flavored or plain) was pretty much nonexistent. I grew up on those tinned bread crumbs laced …

Before Food Editor Emma Laperruque’s recipe for Pecorino Dumplings, my relationship with bread crumbs (whether store-bought or homemade, fresh or dried, flavored or plain) was pretty much nonexistent. I grew up on those tinned bread crumbs laced with Italian seasonings, but never thought to make homemade bread crumbs myself.

But then Emma asked a very good question: Why would you *ever* throw bread butts away, when—fresh or dried or even stale—they could have a very exciting future in crumb form? Now, I stockpile heels, odds, and ends in a tightly sealed bag in the freezer. When a dish is lacking a crispy-crunchy something, I’ll pull out a heel or two, blitz it in the blender (a la method #1 below), toss gently with olive oil or anchovy oil or sun-dried tomato oil and toast until crisp. 

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Our 34 Best Holiday Recipes (That Also Happen to Be Vegan)

Many holiday recipes contain dairy, eggs, or meat (or all of the above). But what if you’re not eating milk or eggs, or entertaining guests that aren’t, or simply want a short respite during the holidays before diving back in again?

Below are 34 of ou…

Many holiday recipes contain dairy, eggs, or meat (or all of the above). But what if you're not eating milk or eggs, or entertaining guests that aren't, or simply want a short respite during the holidays before diving back in again?

Below are 34 of our best vegan holiday recipes—but with no sacrifice in flavor, heartiness, nor coziness—all smartly constructed, rigorously tested, enjoyed, and shared by members of the community. There's nary a sketchily retrofitted recipe in sight, just vegan dishes that happen to be.

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How to Decorate Gingerbread Cookies to Win You the Swap

Anna Hezel is a food, culture, and travel writer, and currently a senior editor at TASTE. Her first book, Lasagna, features 50 creative baked pasta recipes. Even though holiday cookie swaps aren’t officially competitions, Anna’s shared…

Anna Hezel is a food, culture, and travel writer, and currently a senior editor at TASTE. Her first book, Lasagna, features 50 creative baked pasta recipes. Even though holiday cookie swaps aren’t officially competitions, Anna’s shared with us some of her favorite gingerbread decorating tips to ensure hers (and now yours) are the prettiest of the bunch.

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Stollen: The Ultimate German Christmas Bread

It’s December, which means the holidays are nigh! Today, we’re celebrating with stollen—a traditional German Christmas bread, also known as Christstollen and Weihnachtsstollen (fun fact: Weihnachten means “Christmas” in German). Studded with nuts and d…

It's December, which means the holidays are nigh! Today, we're celebrating with stollen—a traditional German Christmas bread, also known as Christstollen and Weihnachtsstollen (fun fact: Weihnachten means "Christmas" in German). Studded with nuts and dried fruits then dusted with a generous coating of icing sugar, German stollen is a delicious way to celebrate these cold-weather months, especially when guests are coming in and out of your home. Here's how to make it.


Christmas is a time of elaborate fruit-and-booze-laden breads, puddings, and cakes. It is the time of airy panettone and fruitcake and brandy-soaked puddings lit on fire. It is also the time of stollen, a traditional German Christmas treat of yeasted bread stuffed to the gills with brandy-soaked fruit and marzipan, then coated with a shell of powdered sugar.

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14 Thanksgiving Desserts to Make (& Freeze!) Right Now

It’s almost Thanksgiving! Have you signed up for our newsletter yet? Leading up to the big day, get all the best tips from Food52 editors right to your inbox. Today, we’re helping you get ahead with the one part of the meal that almost ASKS t…

It's almost Thanksgiving! Have you signed up for our newsletter yet? Leading up to the big day, get all the best tips from Food52 editors right to your inbox. Today, we're helping you get ahead with the one part of the meal that almost ASKS that you make it in advance: dessert.

While it may be news that you can freeze baked pies, it's certainly not news that checking off elements of your meal—especially a big meal like, say, Thanksgiving—ahead of time is a really really good idea.

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